awareness

report

Source: http://econsultancy.com/us/blog/11198-mobile-marketing-mainly-used-for-customer-acquisition-report

However, as search is second only to email as the most popular smartphone task, there is certainly value in using mobile for customer acquisition and awareness.

The survey also asked respondents which mobile marketing tactics they use.

Reflecting the fact that social media is a hugely popular activity on smartphone, 66% of marketers said they invest in social mobile advertising.

Display was the second most popular activity (44%) followed by mobile web landing pages with promotions and location-targeted advertising (both 37%).

Interestingly, only 22% said they invest in mobile paid search, which suggests advertisers are missing the opportunity presented by this channel. We’ve seen numerous surveys which show that although mobile search spend is increasing rapidly, it’s still a relatively untapped area for marketers.

For example, data from Marin Software revealed that mobile devices accounted for 13% of search spend in June 2012, yet took a 20% share of clicks.

This is despite the fact that separate surveys shows that search spend increased 250% in Q1 and 333% in Q2 2012 compared with the same periods in 2011.

KPIs

Forrester also asked respondents what KPIs they use to assess their mobile marketing initiatives.

The most common answer was web traffic and visitors (63%), followed by CTR (58%), brand awareness (54%) and revenue (44%). 

The report takes this as further evidence that too many mobile advertisers are using desktop marketing tactics and haven’t yet adapted to the opportunities presented by mobile.

It recommends that marketers use mobile to deliver highly contextual, relevant information that directly engage individual consumers.

For further information on this topic check out our blog posts on whether your mobile strategy is fit for purpose and seven best practice tips for mobile marketers.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, December 4th, 2012 news No Comments

3 Myths About Facebook The Company Wishes Would Go Away (FB)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/myths-about-facebook-2012-12

carolyn everson facebook

Ever since Facebook went public earlier this year — and was finally liberated from the SEC-required “quiet period” that all companies must go through when offering stock — Facebook has been trying to chase down several untrue rumors about how its business works.

As the old saying goes, a lie will go round the world while truth is pulling its boots on.

We sat down recently with Carolyn Everson, Facebook’s vp/global marketing solutions, and asked her what the most common misconceptions were among advertisers about the way Facebook works.

She told us that these are the three of the biggest:

1. “Facebook ads don’t work.”

Everson says: “I see it in the press sometimes. I will hear a marketer say, ‘Prove it to me, show me how Facebook marketing works.’ To me that’s code for ‘I haven’t believed it yet, or I haven’t seen enough data.’ And my team now is equipped globally with literally hundreds of examples and proof points of how Facebook advertising works [for] everything from Samsung launching a product down to your small/medium business trying to drive people into their stores.”

2. “Mobile is bad for Facebook.”

To be fair, this myth was started by Facebook itself, when it warned in its IPO papers that had not yet properly monetized mobile. It warned again in Q2that mobile may “negatively affect” revenue. Since then, however, mobile has turned out to be huge for Facebook.

Ev erson says: “Mobile is fantastic for monetization. Fourteen percent of our revenue from the third quarter was from mobile. The CPMs are higher in mobile across the board. The performance in the news feed on mobile are 8 to 10X. Let me give you some interesting stats. Rosetta Stone, language provider, did an offers product. They got 560,000 claims, 98 percent of them via mobile. Lawson’s is a Japanese convenient store, kind of like 7-11, they got 598,000 claims, 93 percent from mobile. It is a very powerful way for our marketers to reach our users and I will tell you that when I sit with the client council members, Keith Weed at Unilever or Marc Pritchard at P&G, any of the top CMOs, they are entirely focused on how Facebook can help them in emerging markets … Clearly more people are joining Facebook on mobile, so mobile’s been very positive from a user growth standpoint.”

3. “Facebook only works for brand awareness.”

Everson says too many advertisers think Facebook is only good at generating vague brand image impressions, and it’s not for driving direct sales. But she believes Facebook has uses throughout marketing’s customer “funnel”:

“The third myth, Facebook only works for top-of-the-funnel objectives, for brand awareness, for people having conversations or earned media. What we have now demonstrated consistently is we deliver throughout the entire funnel. ”

Disclosure: The author owns Facebook stock.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, December 4th, 2012 news No Comments

Effectiveness of B2B Online Display Advertising Questioned

Source: http://www.addon.tv/media-news/effectiveness-of-b2b-online-display-advertising-questioned.html

Effectiveness of B2B Online Display Advertising Questioned


According to a new report from Forrester, summarized by MarketingProfs, only 13% of B2B interactive marketers say they have increased online display budgets in 2011 relative to 2010 levels, in large part due to perceptions of ineffectiveness.

71% of B2B marketers surveyed say they used display advertising during the fourth quarter of 2010, whereas 86% of B2C marketers reported doing so.

Attitudes toward online display are negative, particularly toward ad exchanges, DSPs (demand-side platforms), and ad networks:

  • 27% of B2B marketers say they anticipate increased effectiveness of display advertising via exchanges over the next three years
  • 21% expect increased effectiveness of display media via DSPs over the next three years
  • 16% expect increased effectiveness of display ads via ad networks over the next three years

Given lengthy and complex purchase cycles, says the report, most B2B marketers focus display efforts on increasing brand awareness, lead generation, reaching key target audiences, and driving direct sales.

Only 20% of marketers focus display efforts on increasing site visits (e.g., using campaigns to drive clicks to lead-securing and nurturing opportunities such as webinars, whitepapers, and virtual events). Still fewer marketers focus display efforts on driving brand favorability (17%) and customer lifetime value (14%), observes the report.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012 news No Comments

Twitter gains mass awareness but usage remains light

AWARENESS

2010 – 87% awareness

2009 – 24% awareness

2008 – 5% awareness

USAGE

2010

– 1,500 million pageviews per month (71 pageviews per month avg)

– 162 million visits per month (8 visits per month avg)

– 21 million unique visitors per month

Arbitron Figures

2010 – 7% active users (use at least once per month)

2009 – 2% active users

Source: http://www.digidaydaily.com/stories/digital-content-today-arbitron-posts-twitter-numbers

Digital Content Today: Arbitron Posts Twitter Numbers

Media usage tracking company is reporting some surprising numbers on Twitter usage. According to a report in RadioInk, a webinar fromArbitron/Edison Research revealed that 87% of Americans are now aware of Twitter, up from 24% in 2009 and just 5% when the question was first asked, in 2008. But in looking at how many Americans are active users of Twitter — defined as using the service at least once a month — that figure came in at 7%, or about 17 million people, up from 2% in 2009.

Those are huge numbers to be sure, but less that what the blogosphere and assumed ubiquity of Twitter actually seems to be. Edison VP/Strategy & Marketing Tom Webster said awareness of Twitter has soared over a very short period. Webster compared Twitter usage to that of Facebook, the “10-ton gorilla” of social networking, with about six times as many users as Twitter although awareness of the services is roughly equal, and said, “Given that awareness per se is not a constraint, I think the smartest thing you can say about this particular graph is that Twitter has yet to articulate its value to mainstream Americans.”

Arbiron/Edson says that 18% of active Twitter users access the service several times a day and 15 % report they use it at least once a day, while 22% say they’re on Twitter at least once a month. But more than half — 53% — of active Twitter users don’t post tweets themselves and are instead, Webster said, “driven to go there as consumers of broadcast content.”

Other data:
•    About 51 % of active Twitter users are white, 24% are African American — about twice the percentage of African Americans in the general population. The study speculated that African Americans may use Twitter more “conversationally” than other users.
•    About 19% saying they’re “among the first” to buy or try new products, compared to 10 % of the population as a whole. 25% say they buy or try products before others, but not first.
•    They’re also inclined to access the Internet from several locations, and 63% access social networking from a mobile phone, compared to 35 % of all social-network users. And for Twitter users, Webster said, SMS is “pretty much like oxygen”: 92% use SMS, and 73% text multiple times a day.
•    About 42% of monthly Twitter users say they use the service to learn about products and services, and 41% use it to post their own opinions about products, while 31 % seek others’ opinions.

Active Twitter users report spending four hours a day online, compared to about two hours for the general population. But, Webster noted, “the other media here aren’t proportionately lower.” Twitterers spend two hours, 41 minutes a day with radio, compared to two hours, five minutes for the general population, and they spend three hours, 22 minutes with TV, compared to three hours, 25 minutes.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Monday, May 3rd, 2010 digital 1 Comment

ClickZ articles by Augustine Fou, PhD

Dr. Augustine Fou is Group Chief Digital Officer of Omnicom’s Healthcare Consultancy Group. He has nearly 15 years of digital strategy consulting experience and is an expert in data mining, analytics, and consumer insights research, with specific knowledge in the consumer payments, packaged goods, food/beverage, retail/apparel, and healthcare sectors.

Dr. Fou has provided strategic counsel on the use and integration of online marketing to clients such as AT&T, IBM, Intel, ExxonMobil, MasterCard, Unilever, Pepsi, DrPepper, Frito Lay, Taco Bell. KFC. Atari, Conde Nast, Hachette Filipacchi, Victoria’s Secret, Liz Claiborne, and others. He has served as expert witness on online payments for the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and advised government agencies such as the Norwegian Trade Counsel, the Gouvernement du Quebec, Invest in Sweden Agency, and the Canadian Consulate.

Dr. Fou is an Adjunct Professor at New York University in the Integrated Marketing Department of the School for Continuing and Professional Studies. He also writes a monthly column for ClickZ’s Experts Columns on Integrated Marketing and is a frequent speaker and panelist at online and advertising industry conferences.

He started his career with McKinsey & Company and recently served as SVP, Digital Lead at McCann/MRM Worldwide. Dr. Fou completed his PhD at MIT at the age of 23 in the Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering.

Recent articles by Augustine Fou

The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply, Part 3
Debunking the laws of singularity, unpredictability, success, failure, hype, acceleration, and resources. Last in a three part (3 comments) Apr 1, 2010

The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply, Part 2
Why the laws of duality, the opposite, and others no longer hold true. Second in a three-part (1 comments) Mar 4, 2010

The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply
The game has changed as the balance of power shifts away from advertisers to the very people they used to target. First in a three part (14 comments) Feb 4, 2010

10 Commandments of Modern Marketing
A list of the 10 rules every marketer should follow to meet consumer needs in (18 comments) Jan 7, 2010

Is Believing in Behavioral Targeting Like Believing in Santa?
Should we have grown out of our naïve belief in behavioral (25 comments) Dec 17, 2009

What’s Wrong With the Net Promoter Score
Three reasons why the Net Promoter score is a waste of (19 comments) Nov 19, 2009

How to Do Social Marketing in Heavily Regulated Industries
Financial services, pharmaceutical, and healthcare are ripe for social marketing. Here’s (11 comments) Oct 22, 2009

A New Definition of ‘Digital’
Defining ‘digital’ as the collection of habits and expectations of today’s consumers — and what that means to (7 comments) Sep 24, 2009

Metrics, Metrics Everywhere
Thanks to social networks and digital tools, metrics can provide relevant marketing research in real time and reveal new business (3 comments) Aug 27, 2009

Branding Today: Why It’s Ineffective, Irrelevant, Irritating, and Impotent
Brands must act on real-time consumer feedback to continuously develop awesome (51 comments) Jul 31, 2009

Advertising Does Not Create Demand, But…
It may help fulfill demand. Understand the (18 comments) Jul 2, 2009

Consumers Have Changed, So Should Advertisers
Five ways that consumers have irreversibly altered their expectations online and (7 comments) Jun 4, 2009

Social Media Benchmarks: Realities and Myths
Benchmarks to avoid and others to embrace. (5 comments) May 7, 2009

The ROI for Social Media Is Zero
If social marketing’s done right, the potential ROI could be infinite. Five tips to get you (51 comments) Apr 9, 2009

How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising
Planning an awareness campaign in TV or other media? Advertisers can now correlate money spent on that campaign to a lift in sales — and estimate the return on (4 comments) Mar 12, 2009

Social Intensity: A New Measure for Campaign Success?
A look at two metrics that online marketers should pay attention to today. And they are not frequency and (4 comments) Feb 11, 2009

Beyond Targeting in the Age of the Modern Consumer
Three tips for using “missing link” marketing to solve targeting’s Jan 15, 2009

Experiential Marketing
Consumers are savvy and informed; they won’t just take your word on a product. Experiencing the product is more important than (1 comments) Dec 18, 2008

Search Improves All Marketing Aspects
Search is much more than just an opportunity for marketers to push out another Nov 20, 2008

Social Commerce: In Friends We Trust
How to integrate social networks into your marketing (1 comments) Nov 6, 2008

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Sunday, April 4th, 2010 digital No Comments

Even Major Sites are Not Yet Benefiting From the Full Power of Search

@glenngabe‘s post on  FaceYahoogle – The Impact of Facebook, Yahoo, and Google on Website Traffic inspired me to also look at the search terms driving traffic.  Most sites, even major ones have their own brand terms driving traffic. This is OK, but it is taking significantly less advantage of the full power of search.A more ideal scenario for sites is that they have a large number of non-brand terms driving traffic — i.e. the keywords they want to be known for are driving traffic to them.  The premise is that if the user already knew the brand or brand name, it would be redundant for the advertiser to spend awareness ad dollars on them. The advertiser wants to get users to their site who do not already know their brand name.  This is especially true for pharma drug websites, as you will see in the following examples.

GENERAL SITES

These sites have such a diverse set of products, services, or topics, we don’t expect the top search terms driving traffic to be anything other than their brand terms.  But they should have a long tail of thousands of keywords driving traffic (and they are, in the following examples).

NYTimes.com

nytimes

LinkedIn.com

linkedin

Weather.com

weather

CATEGORY SPECIFIC SITES

These sites focus on specific product categories, so one would expect that they should have keywords around their product category driving traffic — e.g. clothing, chocolate, wine, etc.  But as you can see, most don’t and the total number of keywords driving traffic could be larger than it is now (implying more long tail keywords).

JCrew.com – clothing

jcrew

Apple.com – computers, consumer electronics, iPod, music

apple

Godiva.com – chocolate

godiva

AnnTaylor.com – clothing, women’s

anntaylor

SINGLE NICHE SITES

Such sites should be all over search terms that surround the topic areas that they want to be known for. But as you see from the analytics, most don’t. Instead, the top terms driving traffic are their own brand name. Again, if the user already knew the brand, additional advertising would be wasted on them. The sites need to make efforts to “own” additional keywords (or at least “show up at the party”) so people who don’t know the brand name might still have a chance finding them when they type in other keywords surrounding the specific niche.

Sutent (Pfizer) – cancer drug

sutent

Nucynta (J0hnson & Johnson) – pain drug

nucynta

Spiriva (Boehringer Ingelheim, Pfizer) – COPD drug

NOTE: This is the best of the bunch of drug sites.  COPD, the disease area they want to be known for, does actually show up in the first 5 search terms driving traffic, along with emphysema and their product name handihaler. Also, notice they have nearly 10 times the number of keywords driving traffic compared to the other 2 drugs cited (65 vs 7 or 8 )

spiriva

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Sunday, December 6th, 2009 digital 1 Comment

How to make a viral video – a 5-step guide

1. select a product that is a low consideration product (e.g. a song) whose primary missing link is awareness

2. create a funny and entertaining video that features that product or a key attribute of the product

3. [ contact us for the “secret sauce” of step 3 ]

4. continue to build the momentum and build further social amplification by real people (won’t happen if the content is not funny, entertaining, useful, or unexpected)

5. use analytics to determine how to further optimize the content itself to match what characteristics actually went viral (based on how people talked about it when they passed it along)

Examples of videos whose viral effects were successfully manufactured over time. Obama Girl; Lonelygirl15 Brea Olson; Notice the shape of the stats curve of the more recent lonelygirl15 video from 2008. It is much flatter, which is a characteristic of non-viral videos. This is after they revealed that the original lonelygirl15 was a fake; now they have to support the view count through traditional paid media and continuous PR to accumulate the views.

obama-girl-viral-video

lonelygirl15-brea-viral-video

lonelygirl15-recent-non-viral-video

How the JKWedding Viral Video was A Manufactured Success

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, August 5th, 2009 SEO, social networks 2 Comments

viral videos that worked – drove sales

Awareness stage

– Smirnoff Tea Partay – white guys rapping; helped drive sales of the new product because it solved the awareness missing link for the product

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, July 30th, 2009 digital No Comments

The generalization that TV ads are more “helpful” than internet ads is simply false and irresponsible

In the following study published by Harris Interactive and Adweek Media, they show a chart which seemingly shows that TV ads are “most helpful” in making a purchase decision. If you were give the following list of choices —  TV ads, newspaper ads, search engine ads, radio ads, banner ads, and none — and asked to select which was most helpful to your purchase decision; which would you choose? And would you choose that because it was more familiar to you (e.g. TV), seen more frequently, etc. Or is it that banner ads are generally known to be ignored (eye tracking studies show that most users know not to look at the top and right sides of a web page, knowing that banner ads typcially go there).

for new products
where the missing link is simply awareness
TV is very effective
in driving an initial burst of sales
starting pt is zero sales
so if you make people aware
some will buy
11:04 PM in the case of new products
online ads are not great
but you have to break online ads into 2 types
banner ads (push) versus search ads (pull)
search ads are not useful here
because it is a new product and people
wont know to search for it
11:05 PM banner ads may work
because they are for awareness
and they are displayed on pages where people are looking at content
but compared to TV advertising
people have accepted ads as part of the “price” of TV
on the contrary
people have always expected itnernet content to be free
and they have devloped habits to
11:06 PM avoid lokoing at top of page and right side
so banner ads are pretty damn bad at
generating awareness
because people simply dont look
so of the 3
tv ads, banner ads and search ads
tv ads are better in the case of new products where the missing link is awareness
11:07 PM when you get to more established products
the balance changes
the missing link is not awareness
the missing links are further down the funnel
e.g. consideration
modern consumers need more info
they dont just trust an advertiser
and TV ads give them too little info to be useful
11:08 PM banner ads are still ignored just as much as before
but search ads become more important
by looking at what people are searching for
yu know what part of the purch funnel they are at
and what missing link they are trying to solve
so in summary
11:09 PM making the generalization that TV ads are more effective than internet ads is simply false and irresponsible; we must take into account dozens more parameters that impact purchase
decisions


Source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/television/tv-ads-most-helpful-web-banners-most-ignored-9645/


More than one-third of Americans (37%) say that TV ads are most helpful to them in making a purchase decision, while nearly half say they ignore internet banner ads, according to (pdf) a poll from AdWeekMedia and Harris Interactive.

In terms of the helpfulness of ads in other media, newspapers rank second behind TV, with 17% reporting that newspaper ads are most helpful, while 14% say the same about internet search-engine ads:

harris-poll-adweek-media-most-helpful-ads-june-2009.jpg

At the other end of the spectrum, Radio ads (3%) and internet banner ads (1%) are not considered helpful by many people. The poll found also that more than one fourth (28%) of Americans say that none of these types of advertisements are helpful to them in the purchase-decision-making process.

Not surprisingly, the types of ads Americans find helpful vary by age and, slightly, by region:

  • 50% of people ages 18-34 find TV ads most helpful.
  • 31% of those ages 55+ say newspaper ads are most helpful.
  • 40% of Southerners find TV ads most helpful, while only one-third (33%) of Midwesterners feel the same.

Banner Ads Most Ignored
Almost half of Americans (46%) say they ignore internet banner ads, according to the study. Much further down the list of ignored items are internet search engine ads (17% of people ignore), television ads (13%), radio ads (9%), and newspaper ads (6%):

harris-poll-adweek-media-most-helpful-ads-june-20091.jpg

One in ten Americans (9%) say they do not ignore any of these types of ads.

Age and regional differences:

  • 50% of those ages 35-44 and 51% of Midwesterners say they ignore Internet banner ads compared with 43% of 18-34 year olds as well as Easterners and Southerners.
  • 20% of Americans 18-34 years old (20%) say they ignore Internet search engine ads while 20% of those ages 55+ ignore TV ads.

Harris Interactive suggestes that these findings are important because, despite online video and the ability to use a DVR to shift live programming, TV ads remain most helpful to consumers. Conversely, while an internet strategy is essential for a comprehensive ad campaign, banner ads are only considered helpful by a few and are ignored the most, the polling fiirm said.

About the survey: The AdweekMedia/The Harris Poll was conducted online in the US from June 4-8, 2009 among 2,521 adults (ages 18+). Figures for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, region and household income were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population. Propensity score weighting was also used to adjust for respondents’ propensity to be online.


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, July 28th, 2009 digital No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

Augustine Fou portrait
http://twitter.com/acfou
Send Tips: tips@go-digital.net
Digital Strategy Consulting
Dr. Augustine Fou LinkedIn Bio
Digital Marketing Slideshares
The Grand Unified Theory of Marketing