belief

Retailers Still Striving For A Single View Of The Customer Across Channels

Source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/topics/e-commerce/retailers-still-striving-for-a-single-view-of-the-customer-across-channels-30361/

A sizable majority of retailers believe that multi-channel customers are either significantly (47%) or slightly (29%) more profitable than single-channel customers, something consumers themselves appear to agree with. But a new RSR Research study [download page] finds that despite retailers’ belief in the value of an omnichannel strategy, they continue to encounter significant difficulties along […]

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Monday, June 17th, 2013 news No Comments

Majority of Marketers Under-utilizing Their OWN Data

This brings me to some new data that my firm has uncovered. The state of segmentation suggests that marketers are missing many segmentation opportunities.

While I have written before and have proven the performance of segmentation, what is interesting is that we are starting to see marketers work more toward attitude and satisfaction surveys. This notion of an über-crowdsource is a necessary thing to do, but our belief is that it should not exceed the data and information that you know about your subscribers and clients – including spending and click data.

We’ll see this view of this chart – but what do you all think? Should marketers use mushy, social satisfaction “Thank you” elements in advance of spending and behavior?

segmentation-opportunities

Our research would suggest that you focus first on the things that you know as truisms. As in spending, clicks, and that old recency-frequency-monetary (RFM) approach that I have seen proven since the late 1980s in my earliest catalog and CompuServe, er, Internet days.

Targeting clickers and buyers drives more revenue than targeting likers. It works. All tactics have a place, and in combination there is a huge massive return when email is married to social data and attitudinal data.

But please, don’t skip your own ability to target off your own data, as it’s likely that those who like you have bought from you.

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Monday, April 22nd, 2013 news No Comments

Read Anonymous Reviews like Graffiti

Source: http://lifehacker.com/5886582/read-anonymous-reviews-like-graffiti

Read Anonymous Reviews Like GraffitiTrolls. They fill the internet with insults, dead-end arguments, and inanity the likes of which we’ve never seen. Or maybe we have. The Guardian’s David Mitchell notes that trolling comments aren’t all that different from graffiti, and should likewise carry no more weight.

More specifically, Mitchell is talking less about trolls as you and I know them and more about anonymous, often inaccurate online reviews. It’s not a bulletproof analogy by any means, but Mitchell’s idea does reframe the way you look at anonymous content in a compelling way:

When you read a bit of graffiti that says something like “Blair is a liar”, you don’t take it as fact. You may, independently, have concluded that it is fact. But you don’t think that the graffiti has provided that information. It is merely evidence that someone, when in possession of a spray can, wished to assert their belief in the millionaire former premier’s mendacity. It is unsubstantiated, anonymous opinion. We understand that instinctively. We need to start routinely applying those instincts to the web.

If you read a review, an opinion, a description or a fact and you don’t know who wrote it then it’s no more reliable than if it were sprayed on a railway bridge. We should always assume the worst so that all those who wish to convince… have an incentive to identify themselves.

The flip side of the coin, of course, is that anonymity is vital to the spread of information on the internet. The important tool to remember, as always, is your skepticism. Without it, you’re letting yourself get all worked up over graffiti. (And we’re not talking Banksy here—or even Hanksy.) Photo remixed from The Awl.

An internet troll’s opinion should carry no more weight than graffiti | The Guardian

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Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012 digital strategy No Comments

Google Gets Serious About Youtube Royalties with Rightsflow Purchase [Google]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5867476/google-gets-serious-about-youtube-royalties-with-rightsflow-purchase

Google Gets Serious About Youtube Royalties with Rightsflow PurchaseGoogle announced on Friday that it has purchased the music licensing company RightsFlow for its detailed information about who should get paid when any of over 30 million songs get played.

Neither Google nor Rightsflow would comment on the deal beyond their official statements, but we have pieced together some of the reasons Google would purchase a music licensing company like RightsFlow, which deals with “mechanical” royalties owed to songwriters, publishers, and other copyright holders. They whenever a non-human thing – like a compact disc, website, or music app –plays music.

RightsFlow, pictured here, now belongs to Google, which will use it to simplify royalty accounting on YouTube and possibly other music services.

The big reason Google would do this is that YouTube continues to be such a massive free music destination. It simply made more sense to buy RightsFlow outright to help keep its administrative and legal costs down, than to continue to rely on its services alongside other RightsFlow clients such as Rhapsody.

To be clear, this doesn’t give Google any rights to this music; it just makes those rights easier to deal with.

The acquisition, announced on Friday (when companies typically announce stuff they don’t want people paying attention to) is more evidence that Google is serious about YouTube as a free music destination. It should now be able to add even more music without worrying as much about lawsuits or expensive accounting.

Once Google has identified songs uploaded to YouTube using its Content ID fingerprinting technology, it should be able to figure out more easily which publishers and songwriters to pay. This could also help Google deal with its Google music store or other Google stuff in the future, although for now, Google’s focus for this deal is squarely on YouTube.

RightsFlow, recently named the #8 most desirable place to work in New York by Crain’s New York Business, owns information that is mostly publicly available. What makes it valuable is its ability to search all that data, making it easier to license lots of songs at once.

So, basically, Google just acquired a search engine, sort of like Google itself – except now, it could just have just one (admittedly very busy) user.

Google Gets Serious About Youtube Royalties with Rightsflow Purchase Evolver.fm observes, tracks and analyzes the music apps scene, with the belief that it’s crucial to how humans experience music, and how that experience is evolving.


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Tuesday, December 13th, 2011 news No Comments

Facebook Photo Library Dwarfs Everything Else on the Planet [Facebook]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5841667/facebook-photo-library-dwarfs-everything-else-in-the-planet

Facebook Photo Library Dwarfs Everything Else on the PlanetCheck out the gigantic volume of photos now stored in Facebook compared to Flickr, the Library of Congress and Instagram. I knew they were big, but I never imagined the difference could be so huge. 140 billion photos! It defies belief.

It’s 10,000 times larger than the photo catalog in the Library of Congress! And Flickr, which I erroneously thought would be larger than anything else, is just a tiny fraction of Facebook.

Digital cameras are now ubiquitous – it is estimated that 2.5 billion people in the world today have a digital camera. If the average person snaps 150 photos this year that would be a staggering 375 billion photos. That might sound implausible but this year people will upload over 70 billion photos to Facebook, suggesting around 20% of all photos this year will end up there. Already Facebook’s photo collection has a staggering 140 billion photos, that’s over 10,000 times larger than the Library of Congress.

According to 1000memories, so far humanity has taken 3.5 trillion. Right now, “every 2 minutes today we snap as many photos as the whole of humanity took in the 1800s.”

Maybe someday someone would do something incredibly useful with them, like monitoring the state of mind of the whole planet by analyzing the expressions and landscapes of all these photos.

Facebook Photo Library Dwarfs Everything Else on the PlanetIt’s sad to see the demise of analog photos—and surprising that there were still four billion taken in the last year alone. [1000memories]


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Monday, September 19th, 2011 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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