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Mobile Is Starting To Drive Global Internet Penetration

Source: https://intelligence.businessinsider.com/welcome

The PC has long been associated with bringing the Internet to new audiences, but that perception is changing. These days, the world’s unconnected billions are being introduced to the Web on their mobile screens.

According to the International Telecommunications Union, there were 1.6 billion mobile Internet users at year-end 2012, up from 1.2 billion a year prior.

The mobile Internet is scaling incredibly fast. It took the desktop-based Web 18 years to reach 1.6 billion users.

The ITU forecasts there will be 2.1 billion mobile Internet users in 2013, or 71% of the total global Internet population.

Since mobile phones are one of the most widely deployed technologies in history, it makes sense that mobile will start driving global Internet penetration, which currently stands at 36%.

In some countries this is already happening. In China, for example, there are now more mobile Internet than broadband users.

As Google CEO Larry Page argued on the Charlie Rose Show, mobile phones connected to the Internet are going to be “most people’s first computer.”

Click here to download chart and data in Excel.

Mobile Internet Users

Here’s a look at total Internet penetration:

Global Internet Penetration

 

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Friday, July 5th, 2013 news No Comments

2011 Global Mobile Ad Spend By Category

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/bii-report-here-are-the-major-players-in-mobile-advertising-2013-1

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We are in the post-PC era, and soon billions of consumers will be carrying around Internet-connected mobile devices for up to 16 hours a day. Mobile audiences have exploded as a result.

Mobile advertising should be a bonanza, similar to online advertising a decade ago. However, it has been a bit slow off the ground, and its growth trajectory is not clear cut.

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Wednesday, January 30th, 2013 news No Comments

Enterprises Are Spending Wildly On ‘Big Data’ But Don’t Know If It’s Worth It Yet

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/enterprise-big-data-spending-2012-11

Big data is already big business, with companies collectively spending billions on it.

But most of them don’t know if big data is worth it—yet. And they’re not even sure what it means, with the “big data” label applied to all kinds of data-intensive projects.

Most companies said that “big data” meant scooping up large quantities of information, often from nontraditional, server-busting sources like Web traffic logs or social media, and then using it to make business decisions in real time. These include things like watching competitors, monitoring their own brands, creating new services that they can sell, and tracking product and pricing information.

In 2012, companies worldwide spent $4.3 billion on software for big-data projects, market research firm Gartner reports. Most of that was for software running on company-owned servers.

But in a survey of over 800 business and IT professionals commissioned by big-data startup Connotate, 60% said it was too early to tell if a given project was successful and returned a decent value for its investment.

That won’t stop companies from spending even more on big-data projects next year. They’ll be buying new servers and software and hiring experts. Add it up, and big-data projects will drive $34 billion of technology spending in 2013, Gartner predicts.

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Don’t miss: Big Data Is The Hottest Thing To Hit The Web In Years: Here’s Why

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Wednesday, November 14th, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://lifehacker.com/5915568/impossible-is-not-a-fact–its-an-opinion

"Impossible Is Not a Fact. It's an Opinion."“Impossible is just a big word thrown around by small men who find it easier to live in the world they’ve been given than to explore the power they have to change it. Impossible is not a fact. It’s an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It’s a dare. Impossible is potential. Impossible is temporary. Impossible is nothing.” ~ Muhammad Ali

We live in a big world filled with billions of people. It’s hard to believe you can make a dent. It’s hard to believe anything you can do will be remembered. It’s easier to say something is impossible, or at least extremely unlikely. Maybe it is a little delusional to believe you can make a mark on the world in spite of possibility. Then again, nobody who made a mark gave up that hope. Everyone had periods of doubts. Everyone considers giving up sometimes, but then you just have to remember why you tried so hard in the first place. Impossible is your own fabrication, or a thought you’ve inherited from someone else. Ultimately, you decide what’s impossible, and therefore nothing has to be.

Impossible | The Buried Life

Illustration, “Relativity,” by MC Escher.

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Monday, June 4th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Inside Google’s Secret Search Algorithm

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/zzkIcilnJp4/inside-googles-secret-search-algorithm

Wired’s Steven Levy takes us inside the “algorithm that rules the web“—Google’s search algorithm, of course—and if you use Google, it’s kind of a must-read. PageRank? That’s so 1997.

It’s known that Google constantly updates the algorithm, with 550 improvements this year—to deliver smarter results and weed out the crap—but there are a few major updates in its history that have significantly altered Google’s search, distilled in a helpful chart in the Wired piece. For instance, in 2001, they completely rewrote the algorithm; in 2003, they added local connectivity analysis; in 2005, results got personal; and most recently, they’ve added in real-time search for Twitter and blog posts.

The sum of everything Google’s worked on—the quest to understand what you mean, not what you say—can be boiled down to this:

This is the hard-won realization from inside the Google search engine, culled from the data generated by billions of searches: a rock is a rock. It’s also a stone, and it could be a boulder. Spell it “rokc” and it’s still a rock. But put “little” in front of it and it’s the capital of Arkansas. Which is not an ark. Unless Noah is around. “The holy grail of search is to understand what the user wants,” Singhal says. “Then you are not matching words; you are actually trying to match meaning.”

Oh, and by the way, you’re a guinea pig every time you search for something, if you hadn’t guessed as much already. Google engineer Patrick Riley tells Levy, “On most Google queries, you’re actually in multiple control or experimental groups simultaneously.” It lets them constantly experiment on a smaller scale—even if they’re only conducting a particular experiment on .001 percent of queries, that’s a lot of data.

Be sure to check out the whole piece, it’s ridiculously fascinating, and borders on self-knowledge, given how much we all use Google (sorry, Bing). [Wired, Sweet graphic by Wired’s Mauricio Alejo]

Additional Information on Real Time Bidding

http://go-digital.net/blog/2009/09/rtb-real-time-bidding-may-make-ad-exchanges-more-efficient-but-it-still-wont-save-display-ads/

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Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010 digital No Comments

Facebook is going down – pageviews, average stay, pages per visit – why?

From the Compete charts below, it is clear that Facebook is seeing a decline in pageviews, average stay, and pages per visit.  But why?

I know that I have reduced the time I spend on Facebook and I have also reduced the number of messages and other social actions as well.  And I have deleted virtually all of my personal and family photos and will not upload any more. These may be the first signs of a waning of Facebook due to a number of factors.

I can’t get my stuff back out

For example, Facebook has stated that it will not participate in OpenSocial because they do not want people to be able to export their content, conversations, photos, etc, out of Facebook and use on another social network. I am concerned that I will not be able to retrieve or back up content which I believe is mine. I like to have control over my family photos, conversations with friends, etc. I am willing to accept as a “cost” of using the Facebook system the fact that they know who my friends are.  But I am less willing or unwilling to continue putting my content where I cannot get it back, in its entirety.  (Google Docs, for example, just launched a feature where you can back up everything back out of Google Docs into Microsoft Office formats).

Ads in the stream, erosion of trust

A second issue mentioned in a previous post is the increase in advertising on Facebook and also the more unscrupulous practice of injecting ads “into the stream” — ads masquerading as status updates. These are harmful to the overall trust built up in the community and I have un-friended quite a few people whose accounts were clearly used to promote events, products, etc.

Ad-effectiveness sucks

From a prior post – http://bit.ly/EhiW9 – Facebook advertising metric are absolutely abysmal. They keep trying to sell advertisers on the hundreds of billions of pageviews they throw off. But advertisers are getting smarter and more and more of them will buy ads on a cost-per-click basis (instead of CPM, cost per thousand impressions basis).  This means that the ad revenues that Facebook enjoyed from gross INefficiencies will be decimated.


facebook-pageviews

facebook-average-stay

facebook-pages-per-visit

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Friday, October 30th, 2009 digital No Comments

Smaller social networks are losing even the few users they have…

…to larger social networks like facebook where more of the users’ friends actually are.

Hi5, Bebo, and even Ning — the social network predicted to “host some 4 million social networks serving up billions of page views daily” by Gina Bianchini (FastCompany: http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/125/nings-infinite-ambition.html) — are losing traction.

hi5-bebo-ning-unique-visitors

Related:  “If you’re just a feature, someone else will just add you and your raison d’être vanishes (you “tweet” your status in Facebook, LinkedIn, MySpace, etc.)

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Thursday, July 9th, 2009 digital No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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