Brookings

The Top 10 Manufactured Products In America’s $2 Trillion Export Industry

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/usa-manufactured-products-exports-america-2012-3


general electric locomotive

According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, the U.S. exported $2.1 trillion worth of goods in 2011.

And a according to a new study by the Brookings titled Export Nation 2012, exports played a major role in pulling the U.S. economy out of recession, even as jobs were vanishing.

Exports jumped by over 11 percent in 2010–the first year of the recovery.  This represented the fastest growth rate since 1997.

Jobs supported by exports grew by 6 percent during that same period.

“Exports are helping to lead us out of the recession and into recovery,” says Emilia Istrate, lead author of the new report.

“Manufacturing industries accounted for about 61 percent of U.S. exports and produced three-quarters of the nation’s additional sales abroad between 2009 and 2010.”

What follows are the top 10 U.S. manufactured exports in 2010, which helped carry us out of the recession.

Electrical Equipment

Share of U.S. manufacturing exports:
3.4%

Share of manufacturing export growth:
3.4%

Total growth rate:
14.7%

Total revenue:
$32.2 billion

Source: Brookings

 

Fabricated Metal Products

Share of U.S. manufacturing exports:
3.4%

Share of manufacturing export growth:
3.9%

Total growth rate:
16.8%

Total revenue:
$32.6 billion

Source: Brookings

Medical Equipment, Sporting Goods & Miscellaneous

Share of U.S. manufacturing exports:
4.1%

Share of manufacturing export growth:
2.9%

Total growth rate:
9.6%

Total revenue:
$39.4 billion

Source: Brookings

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Thursday, March 8th, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5884415/travelling-in-modern-china-requires-serious-secret-agent-skills

Travelling in Modern Day China Requires Cold War Era Secret Agent SkillsIf Kenneth G. Lieberthal were anything but a China expert at the Brookings institution, his travelling-in-China security procedures would read like the product of a paranoid mind that watched too many spy movies as a kid:

He leaves his cellphone and laptop at home and instead brings “loaner” devices, which he erases before he leaves the United States and wipes clean the minute he returns. In China, he disables Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, never lets his phone out of his sight and, in meetings, not only turns off his phone but also removes the battery, for fear his microphone could be turned on remotely. He connects to the Internet only through an encrypted, password-protected channel, and copies and pastes his password from a USB thumb drive. He never types in a password directly, because, he said, “the Chinese are very good at installing key-logging software on your laptop.”

Talk about overkill, right? Well he’s not alone. The Times reports that these seemingly paranoid precautions are par for the course for just about anyone with valuable information including government officials, researchers, and even normal businessmen who do business in China.

But what about the rest of us? I may not have any valuable state secrets or research that needs protecting but that doesn’t mean I want the Chinese government snooping on my internetting when I visit my grandparents (especially when the consequences can be so severe). In the past, I’ve relied on a combination of VPNs, TOR, and password-protecting everything I can, but now it sounds like even that isn’t enough. Or maybe it’s totally overkill given my general unimportance in the grand scheme of things. Dear readers, I ask you, how much security is enough when it comes to the average person on vacation? [NY Times]

Image credit: Shutterstock/Rynio Productions

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Sunday, February 12th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

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