budget

drag2share: Samsung Is On Track To Spend ~$13 Billion In Marketing This Year (GOOG)

source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/businessinsider/~3/TcwZ7nXiHnQ/samsung-ad-spending-2013-9

Wondering how Samsung managed to quash Motorola, HTC, and just about every other major Android rival? Start with this chart from analyst Benedict Evans.

Evans notes that Samsung’s run-rate for marketing is $12.7 billion based on marketing tin Q2. That’s more than Google paid to buy all of Motorola. It’s 3X HTC’s entire market cap.

It’s just an insane budget that no other company can keep pace with. Samsung’s final bill could be higher. Evans says that based on historical patterns, it will spend $4.5 billion in the fourth quarter. (He also says that it tends to spend more in Q3, though less in Q1.)

chart of the day samsung marketing


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Wednesday, September 25th, 2013 news No Comments

ROI Rankings: Facebook Deemed More Important Than Twitter and LinkedIn, Less Than Google

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/interactive/roi-rankings-facebook-deemed-more-important-than-twitter-and-linkedin-less-than-google-36695/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

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After Facebook, Twitter (average rating of 3.04) was deemed the next-most important for ROI, followed by LinkedIn (3.38), Yahoo (4.23), and AOL (5.6).

Respondents – a mix of marketers of clients (26%), ad agency employees (30%), and media company employees and consultants (44%) – appear to be satisfied with the support provided by Facebook for their advertising efforts. Almost half believe that Facebook’s support for advertisers has improved to some degree over the past 6 months, compared to only 1 in 10 who believe it has to some extent deteriorated. Additionally, roughly three-quarters are very (10.5%) or somewhat (65.2%) satisfied with the data and analytic tracking they receive from Facebook.

Given improving ROI and support, it’s not surprising that advertisers will be increasing their efforts: over the next year, a majority expect to significantly (11.2%) or moderately (44.5%) increase their Facebook advertising budget.

Interestingly, although Facebook is deriving an increasing share of ad revenues from mobile, advertisers don’t see much separation between the RO! I of mobi! le and desktop ads, with a plurality (38%) rating them about the same. Slightly more than one-third feel that mobile ROI is much (7.7%) or somewhat (27.4%) greater, while 26.9% feel the same way about desktop ROI.

There’s more consensus when it comes to Facebook Exchange, used by about 1 in 5 respondents. Of those, two-thirds said it has been somewhat effective for their campaigns, with another 1 in 5 calling it very effective.

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Tuesday, September 17th, 2013 news No Comments

Digital Ad Agencies Sour on TV, Turn to Online Video

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/television/digital-ad-agencies-sour-on-tv-turn-to-online-video-35073/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

RocketFuel-Digital-Agencies-TV-and-Online-Video-Perceptions-July2013Digital ad agencies believe that the effectiveness of TV advertising is on the decline, and are making a move to online video, according to a survey conducted by Rocket Fuel among 149 digital agency professionals, the majority of whom directly authorize media spend. 8 in 10 respondents plan to spend more on online video this year, even as 60% recognize there are serious barriers to shifting money from TV to do so. Chief among those barriers? Building reach (58%) and prior budget commitments (56%).

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Monday, July 22nd, 2013 news No Comments

Consumers are Responding to Financial Challenges by Cutting Out Non-Essentials

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/topics/financial/consumers-are-responding-to-financial-challenges-by-cutting-out-non-essentials-30711/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

by MarketingCharts staff

Nielsen-Consumer-Response-Higher-Prices-June2013Consumers are learning to live on a tighter budget and cut out unnecessary items, and that has implications for how retailers and manufacturers connect with them, says Nielsen in new survey results. According to the data, 64% of respondents have been affected by rising food prices and 58% by rising gas prices, with rising utility/energy bills (40%), health care costs (30%) and payroll taxes (23%) also affecting some. To cope with these “financial headwinds,” most are tightening their budgets and weeding out non-essentials.

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Monday, July 1st, 2013 news No Comments

Content Marketing The Most Popular Digital Area Slated For A Budget Hike This Year

Source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/direct/content-marketing-the-most-popular-digital-area-slated-for-a-budget-hike-this-year-26817/

Add it to the list of research (such as this and this) heralding the increasing priority of content marketing. This latest piece of research, from Econsultancy and Responsys [download page], finds that 70% of company marketers – who hail mostly from the UK (46%) and other European countries (19%) – plan to increase their content […]

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Thursday, February 7th, 2013 news No Comments

Samsung’s Massive Marketing Budget (AAPL)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-samsungs-massive-marketing-budget-2012-11

Another great chart from Horace Dediu at Asymco. He looks at the advertising budget of Apple, Samsung, HP, Dell, Microsoft, and Coke. Why include Coke? Because it’s a huge advertiser, and its “primary cost of sales is advertising.”

As you can see, Samsung is blowing all the companies away in advertising and marketing.

Not a bad price to pay, if it means you get to become the world’s biggest smartphone company. Certainly HTC wishes it had Samsung’s marketing budget.

chart of the day, samsung's marketing budget in context, november 2012

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Friday, November 30th, 2012 news No Comments

7 Retail Tricks Designed To Make You Spend More

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/7-ways-stores-make-you-spend-more-2012-11

black friday teens shoppingThis post originally appeared on Bankrate.com.

Today’s retailers have uncovered the science behind shopping. Your favorite mall stores actually hire such retail researchers as Paco Underhill, author of Why We Buy: The Science of Shopping.

Underhill has tracked hundreds of thousands of shoppers to study how they shop. “There is nothing random about how a store is arranged and designed. It is carefully calculated to appeal to you in every possible way,” he says.

“The stores have a plan, so you should, too,” says Dave Ramsey, best-selling author of The Total Money Makeover and host of a syndicated financial talk show on the radio.

1. Display ‘magic’

We can learn a lesson in Underhill’s book from a story told by a retailer about a tempting display of T-shirts.

We buy them in Sri Lanka for $3 each. Then we bring them over here and sew in washing instructions, which are in French and English. Notice we don’t say the shirts are made in France. But you can infer that if you like. Then … we fold them just right on a tasteful tabletop display, and on the wall behind it we hang a huge, gorgeous photograph of a beautiful woman in an exo! tic loca le wearing the shirt.”

Resist the urge: “Write a monthly mall shopping budget and stash cash in an envelope specifically for that purpose. When the envelope is empty, stop spending,” says Ramsey. “A written budget makes you think twice when you are tempted by impulse buys.”

2. BOGO and 2-fer deals

BOGOs (buy one, get one), two-fers (two for the price of one) and bundled-item promotions successfully tempt you into shopping more often and spending more to raise the store’s number of sales as well as ticket averages, or amount of each sale. T

hey’re not always a good deal for you if you’re not familiar with the store merchandise and its regular prices. “You’re not saving if you are actually spending more than you planned,” says Underhill.

Resist the urge: “Know your favorite retailers, brands, regular prices, promotions and discounts, and always check the clearance area first to find a similar item on sale to avoid buying two of anything and spending more,” says family financial expert Ellie Kay, author of The 60-Minute Money Workout. “Ask yourself, ‘Do I really need two sweaters or two of the same jeans?'”

3. The right aisle trick

“Retail shopping studies have found that most people turn right when they enter a store. That’s because the majority of the population is right-handed and right-oriented,” says Underhill.

Knowing this, stores highlight tempting new items and trends to the right of the entrance. You’ll find that the music is louder and the displays are brighter to attract you where you will look and turn first. This is also where the most expensive items in the store are generally displayed.

R esist the urge: “Shop with blinders on,” says Kay. “Stick to your list with the cash in your hand. Avoid credit card debt at all costs, and head straight to what you came for.”


See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Monday, November 26th, 2012 news No Comments

Chrome OS on the cheap, but at what cost?

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/11/26/acer-c7-chromebook-review/

Acer C7 Chromebook review: Chrome OS on the cheap, but at what cost?

It’s been just over a month since Google unveiled its gorgeous and affordable $249 Samsung Chromebook only to surprise us days later with an even cheaper system, the $199 Acer C7 Chromebook. At first glance, these two laptops are very similar, both in purpose (cloud-based computing on a budget) and in specs (11.6-inch display, dual-core CPU, 2GB of RAM), but there are significant differences under the hood. Samsung’s offering achieves its svelte form factor, 6.5-hour battery life and attractive price via a fully integrated and fanless ARM-based design while Acer takes a more conservative approach — cramming standard off-the-shelf components like a 2.5-inch hard drive, small-outline memory module, mini-PCIe WiFi card, and Intel Celeron processor into a traditional netbook-like chassis. Does being $50 cheaper make up for the C7’s lack of sex appeal and short 4-hour battery life? What other compromises in performance and build quality (if any) were made to achieve this lower cost? Most importantly, which budget Chromebook is right for you? Find out after the break.

Gallery: Acer C7 Chromebook review

Continue reading Acer C7 Chromebook review: Chrome OS on the cheap, but at what cost?

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Monday, November 26th, 2012 news No Comments

This Chart Is Why A Lot Of People Think HP Is Totally Screwed (HPQ)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/hps-rd-spending-2012-11

This week, we ran a chart showing HP’s crashing stock price since Mark Hurd was forced out of the company.

After we published the chart, a friend emailed to say, “Hurd destroyed the company. Gutted R&D, which was the cardinal sin. It was always an engineer’s company. He financialized it. And in so doing, set in motion the wheels of doom.”

From 2010, here’s a look at how R&D as a percentage of revenue fell under Hurd’s watch.

chart of the day, hp r&d expenses, 2005-2010

But, is the R&D budget really why HP is hosed? Probably not. Look at this chart, also from 2010:

chart of the day, r&d for tech companies, 2009

Anything jump out in that chart?

Apple spent less on R&D than HP, Google, and Microsoft in 2009. No one is going to accuse Apple of not producing great innovative products, despite a small R&D budget.

When Hurd was pushed out, an ex-HP engineer told Joe Nocera slashes in the R&D department was, “why H.P. had no response to the iPad! . ” Apple managed to make the iPad while spending less on R&D, so we’re not sure that totally adds up.

It’s not how much you spend on R&D, it’s what comes of it.

As for the charge that Hurd “financialized” HP, well, that may be true. But, he seemed to be at least somewhat in control of where the company was going. The two CEOs since Hurd have no clue, it seems, about what to do with HP.

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Sunday, November 25th, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5948312/how-makers-are-desktop-fabricating-a-digital-revolution-of-things

How Makers Are Desktop-Fabricating a Revolution of ThingsWhen I was in high school in the late 1970’s, we had workshop class as part of the “Industrial Arts” curriculum. It wasn’t quite clear why this was a required credit—we lived in suburb of Washington, D.C., and there were no factories around and most of my friends’ parents were lawyers and government workers. But learning how to use workshop tools—band saws, table saws, drill presses, and the like—was just part of a mid-twentieth-century American education. The bad kids made ninja throwing stars; the worst made bongs. I made a crude magazine stand that my parents tolerated until I left home; I was lucky to have kept all my fingers through the process. Meanwhile, girls were steered to “Home Economics” to learn about sewing, cooking, and painting, which was, in a sense, another form of required crafting and DIY education.

At home, I made Heathkit electronics kits, which involved soldering irons and weeks of painstaking work with wires and components but were the cheapest way to obtain something like a citizen’s band radio or a stereo amplifier. Chemistry kits had actual chemicals in them (as opposed to little more than baking soda and a ream of legalist warnings, as is now sadly the case), and were great fun. Anybody with a cool or temperamental car spent the weekend under the hood with a wrench, hopping it up and otherwise tinkering with its mechanics. “Taking things apart to see how they work” was just what kids did, and finding users for the parts launched countless fantastic machines, some of which actually worked.

How Makers Are Desktop-Fabricating a Revolution of ThingsBut starting in the 1980s and 1990s, the romance of making things with your own hands started to fade. First manufacturing jobs were no longer a safe way to enter and stay in the middle class, and the workshop lost even its vocational appeal as the number of manufacturing workers in the employment rolls shrank. In its place came keyboards and screens. PCs were introduced, and all the good jobs used them; the school curriculum shifted to train kids to become “symbolic analysts,” to use the social-science phrase for white-collar information work. Computer class replaced shop class. School budget cuts in the 1990s were the nail in the coffin; once the generation of workshop teachers retired, they were rarely replaced; the tools were sold or put in storage.

Imported Asian electronics became better and cheaper than Heathkit gear, and the shift from individual electronic components like resistors and transistors and capacitors to inscrutable microchips and integrated circuits made soldering skills pointless. Electronics became disposable boxes with “no user serviceable parts inside,” as the warning labels put it. Heathkit left the kit business in 1992.

Cars evolved from carburetors and distributor caps that you could fiddle with to rule injection and electronic ignition that you couldn’t. Chips replaced mechanical parts. The new cars didn’t need as much maintenance, and even if you wanted to go under the hood there wasn’t much you could fix or modify, other than to change the oil and the oil filter. The working parts were hermetically sealed and locked down, a price we happily paid for reliability and minimal upkeep.

Just as shop class disappeared with school budget cuts, better opportunities in the workplace for women and gender equality killed Home Economics. Kids grew up with computer and video games, not wrenches and band saws. The best minds of a generation were seduced by software and the infinite worlds to be created online, and they made the digital age we all live in today. That is how the world shifted from atoms to bits. The transformation has gone on for thirty years, a generation, and it’s hard to argue with any of it.

But now, thirty years after “Industrial Arts” left the curriculum and large chunks of our manufacturing sectors have shifted overseas, there’s finally a reason to get your hands dirty again. As desktop fabrication tools go mainstream, it’s time to return “making things” to the high school curriculum, not as the shop class of old, but in the form of teaching design.

Today, schoolchildren learn how to use PowerPoint and Excel as part of their computer class, and they still learn to draw and sculpt in art class. But think how much better it would be if they could choose a third option: design class. Imagine a course where kids would learn to use free 3D CAD tools such as Sketchup or Autodesk 123D. Some would design buildings and fantastic structures, much as they sketch in their notebooks already. Others would create elaborate video game levels with landscapes and vehicles. And yet others would invent machines. Even better, imagine if each design classroom had a few 3D printers or a laser cutter. All those desktop design tools have a “Make” menu item. Kids could actually fabricate what they have drawn onscreen. Just consider what it would mean to them to hold something they dreamed up. This is how a generation of Makers will be created. This is how the next wave of manufacturing entrepreneurs will be born.

From the book: MAKERS: The New Industrial Revolution by Chris Anderson. Copyright 2012 by Chris Anderson. Published by arrangement with Crown Business, a division of Random House,

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Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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