census bureau

More Than 6 in 10 Americans Aged 13-33 Said to Stream Video Weekly

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/television/more-than-6-in-10-americans-aged-13-33-said-to-stream-video-weekly-36629/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

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While GfK says that 51% of the US population watches streaming video weekly, it’s important to note that the survey was limited to 13-54-year-olds. According to the Census Bureau, there were almost 82 million Americans aged 55 and older as of July last year. Given the age trend in streaming video viewing, it’s likely that audiences in the 55+ segment would be smaller, dragging down the overall average.

Nevertheless, the data shows that on a directional basis, streaming video is becoming more mainstream. A variety of connected devices are contributing to the growth:

  • 9% of TV households are using streaming-ready 7G game systems weekly to stream;
  • 5% of TV households are using a streaming-capable HDTV to stream weekly;
  • 5% of consumers aged 13-54 are using a tablet to watching streaming video weekly; and
  • 4% of consumers are using a smartphone to do so.

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Sunday, September 15th, 2013 news No Comments

The Changing Nature of the American Household

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/topics/demographics/the-changing-nature-of-the-american-household-36350/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

Census-Changing-US-Household-Types-1970-2012-Sept2013Marketers often look at household groups, whether they be TV households or high-income households. But what does the typical American household look like? A new study [pdf] from the Census Bureau analyzing a couple of its broader population surveys shows that the constitution of the American household has evolved considerably in the past 4 decades or so, such that there really is no typical household type anymore. For example, as of last year, so-called “nuclear families” accounted for just 19.6% of US households, down from 40.3% in 1970.

While the percentage of households made up of married couples with children has seen a marked decline, other household types have grown more common. Men living alone now represent 12.3% of all households, up from 8.6% in 1980 and just 5.6% in 1970. Additionally, women living alone account for 15.2% of all households, up from 11.5% in 1970.

To be fair, the biggest changes in household dynamics occurred between 1970 and 1980, as the above chart illustrates. But each of those trends has only continued to strengthen since 1980: in the past decade alone, the share of households counted as married couples with children has dropped by almost 5% points.

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Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013 news No Comments

So How Many Millennials Are There in the US, Anyway?

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/topics/demographics/so-how-many-millennials-are-there-in-the-us-anyway-30401/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

CensusBureau-Age-Brackets-as-of-Jul2012-July2013Marketers tend to focus a lot of energy on Millennials. Their lives are deconstructed on many different levels, and there’s research to be found on anything from their media habits to their social influence, to even their alcohol preferences. Those analyses are all helpful in their own right, but –  stepping back to the big picture for a moment – how many of these prized individuals are there in the US? The latest data out from the Census Bureau gives a sense of how large this coveted demographic is.
US Population July 2013

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Monday, July 22nd, 2013 news No Comments

White House unveils National Day of Civic Hacking to solve problems with open data

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2013/01/23/white-house-national-day-of-civic-hacking/

White House unveils National Day of Civic Hacking to solve problems with open data

Sure, the freshly announced National Day of Civic Hacking may sound like it’ll occupy a single square on your calendar, but the White House wants folks to get together on June 1st and 2nd to solve problems with a bit of coding and info from Uncle Sam. Government agencies including the Census Bureau, NASA and the Department of Labor are set to serve up publicly available data for developers and entrepreneurs to concoct solutions for problems affecting cities, states and the country. In addition to government support, the effort is being organized by outfits including Code for America, Random Hacks of Kindness and Eric Schmidt’s Innovation Endeavors. Currently, 27 cities have events scheduled during the weekend in question, but the initiative’s coordinators are looking to spawn even more powwows throughout the US. If you’d like to pitch in or submit ideas for challenges participants should tackle, hit the source links below.

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Via: TechCrunch

Source: White House OSTP, Hack for Change

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Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013 news No Comments

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/lifehacker/full/~3/EPIG2PU6xqU/what-do-you-buy-online-vs-in-stores

Online advertising company Permuto pulled data from the U.S. Census Bureau into a nice infographic comparing people’s purchasing habits in-store vs. online, and it got us wondering: What do you buy online vs. in stores?

(Click the image above for a closer look.)

According to the Census Bureau’s data, the old brick and mortar stores are still responsible for the majority of sales in most of the categories, save for a few notable categories, including books, clothing, and electronics. Since Lifehacker readers are a more tech-savvy crowd than most of the public, we’d guess you tend more toward the buy online crowd. Are you more of a virtual shopper, or do you still prefer to touch and feel before you buy? It certainly varies depending on what you’re buying, so tell us about it in the comments.

What are People Really Buying Online? [Permuto]

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Monday, March 1st, 2010 digital No Comments

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/wi7IRjN1PGg/the-us-is-giving-digitalization-112-percent

If you were ever curious to know how fast our lives are becoming saturated with digital technology, get a load of this graph. In 2004 we were in the kiddie pool and by 2007 we were drowning.

Citing the Census Bureau’s recent Statistical Abstract of the United States, Fast Company notes that an estimated 110 billion text messages were sent on cellphones in December 2008—more than double the previous year. Retail sales also soared from $24 billion when the decade began to $128 billion in 2007.

So where are we now? It’s probably safe to assume that the Cracken has dragged our lifeless corpse to Davy Jones’ locker. [Fast Company]


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Wednesday, January 13th, 2010 digital No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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