ceos

drag2share: Flurry CEO Says IPO Is Inevitable As Its Mobile Ad Reach Overtakes Google’s

source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/businessinsider/~3/0L8Ch6ODo9k/flurry-ipo-and-ceo-simon-khalaf-2013-9

Simon Khalaf, the CEO of mobile adtech company Flurry, tells Business Insider that an IPO is inevitable in the company’s future because his business has grown so big.

There has been gossip about a possible Flurry IPO for months now. Large adtech companies are often aimed specifically at IPO “exits,” so that their venture capital funders can get a payback on their investments. Millennial Media, Tremor Video, YuMe, Criteo and Marin Software have all gone public recently. Yet when CEOs are asked directly if they want the rich rewards of floating their companies on the public markets, they usually demur or hedge.

When we asked Khalaf about an IPO exit, however, he was refreshingly direct: “I consider an IPO an entrance,” he tells us. “We don’t have a choice, our volume is too high and our scale is too big for anyone to absorb us.”

Flurry has a net revenue run-rate of about $100 million. It has 150 employees and has taken $50.5 million in funding from investors. And although that doesn’t make Flurry the biggest player in mobile adtech — InMobi and Velti still have more employees, and Millennial has greater revenues — it is one of the biggest players in big data analytics and mobile app ad reach.

Here’s a slide on the number of mobile devices — 1.1 billion — Flurry reaches with ad impressions inside apps from Khalaf’s pitch deck:

Flurry

It’s an alarming slide, because everyone knows that Google has the largest share of mobile ad revenue on the planet, which is in the billions of dollars. But the Flurry slide refers to reach on devices via ads in apps. Google’s mobile ad business is largely search. And the bulk of consumer time spent on mobile devices is in apps, not on the web, Khalaf says. Here’s the slide he uses to illustrate that point:

Flurry

Flurry offers the full mobile ad stack, including a “supply side platform” for mobile app publishers who want to offers ad space for sale, a “demand side platform” for buyers who want to place ads, an analytics suite to measure the whole thing, and most recently a “real-time bidding” platform so that buyers can place ads on a live auction basis. That RTB marketplace, launched in April, already has 30 DSPs buying in it, Khalaf says. The Guardian and The BBC both use Flurry as publishers.

There is one more thing Khalaf is unusually direct about. Flurry is not yet profitable, he says. Usually when adtech CEOs are asked whether their businesses make money, they launch into an explanation of how they’re investing for growth or scale (or they say something impenetrably complicated about EBITDA). When asked whether the company is profitable, Khalaf says, “No. In 2014 we’re profitable maybe.”

The reason: Flurry is spending $28 million a year on data centers. “The cost of analytics is huge,” Khalaf says. Flurry wants to create the largest HBase cluster in the business, he says, referring to the gigantic — and gigantically expensive — database serving devices that can handle millions of lines of tabled information.


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Friday, September 20th, 2013 news No Comments

Most Important Factor for Digital Outcomes? Senior Management Buy-In

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/interactive/most-important-factor-for-digital-outcomes-senior-management-buy-in-36412/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

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Considering that respondents separately indicated that CEOs are taking a more active role in new digital initiatives, that’s a positive sign for future efforts.

After senior management buy-in (32%), the most commonly-cited factors of success also were managerial: internal leadership (30%); alignment between organizational structure and initiative’s goals (21%); and good management of and sufficient organizational support for the initiative (also 21%).

By contrast, the leading factors of failure (after senior management buy-in – 23%) were the lack of technology infrastructure and IT systems (22%) and quality data (21%), although the absence of internal leadership also ranked relatively highly (17%). Those results imply that not only is senior management buy-in necessary to avoid failure, but so is cooperation with the IT department. But, a recent study from Accenture suggest that such collaboration is fraught with obstacles, with 44% of CMOs surveyed saying there is no need for alignment with the CIO, indicating that there’s more work to be done on this end.

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Friday, September 6th, 2013 news No Comments

C-Suite Execs: More CEOs Are Personally Sponsoring Digital Business Initiatives

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/interactive/c-suite-execs-more-ceos-are-personally-sponsoring-digital-business-initiatives-36395/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

McKinsey-C-Suite-Involvement-Digital-Biz-Initiatives-Sept2013CEOs are becoming more personally involved in digital business initiatives, according to a recent study from the McKinsey Group. The survey, of 850 C-level executives from around the world, found 31% saying that CEOs personally sponsor such initiatives at their organization, a marked increase from 23% indicating that to be the case last year. Interestingly, respondents also suggested that CIOs have  more direct engagement in these activities than CMOs.

The study examined participation in 5 digital-enterprise trends:

  • Big data and advanced analytics;
  • Digital engagement of customers;
  • Digital engagement of employees and external partners;
  • Automation; and
  • Digital innovation.

63% of respondents indicated that CIOs are either supportive and sponsoring these initiatives (26%) or supportive and directly engaged (37%) in them, with 54% concurring with respect to CMO involvement. (An analysis of the CMO/CIO relationship can be found here.)

Also of note: this year, 37% said the CFO is sponsoring digital business initiatives or otherwise directly engaged, up from 32% last year.

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Thursday, September 5th, 2013 news No Comments

This Chart Is Why A Lot Of People Think HP Is Totally Screwed (HPQ)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/hps-rd-spending-2012-11

This week, we ran a chart showing HP’s crashing stock price since Mark Hurd was forced out of the company.

After we published the chart, a friend emailed to say, “Hurd destroyed the company. Gutted R&D, which was the cardinal sin. It was always an engineer’s company. He financialized it. And in so doing, set in motion the wheels of doom.”

From 2010, here’s a look at how R&D as a percentage of revenue fell under Hurd’s watch.

chart of the day, hp r&d expenses, 2005-2010

But, is the R&D budget really why HP is hosed? Probably not. Look at this chart, also from 2010:

chart of the day, r&d for tech companies, 2009

Anything jump out in that chart?

Apple spent less on R&D than HP, Google, and Microsoft in 2009. No one is going to accuse Apple of not producing great innovative products, despite a small R&D budget.

When Hurd was pushed out, an ex-HP engineer told Joe Nocera slashes in the R&D department was, “why H.P. had no response to the iPad! . ” Apple managed to make the iPad while spending less on R&D, so we’re not sure that totally adds up.

It’s not how much you spend on R&D, it’s what comes of it.

As for the charge that Hurd “financialized” HP, well, that may be true. But, he seemed to be at least somewhat in control of where the company was going. The two CEOs since Hurd have no clue, it seems, about what to do with HP.

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Sunday, November 25th, 2012 news No Comments

Romney Lies about Auto Industry – Chrysler and GM CEOs Immediately Rebut His False Information

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Monday, November 5th, 2012 news No Comments

A Truly Embarrassing Chart For Wall Street Stock Analysts

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/this-chart-shows-why-wall-street-stock-ratings-are-a-joke-2012-2


Only five percent of ratings on companies in the S&P 500 are sell ratings.

That’s right: 95 percent of ratings tell investors to hold or buy and only 5 percent say you should sell.

The following chart comes from FactSet via Cullen Roche:

chart

Henry Blodget recently offered a few reasons why you rarely see sell ratings:

  • Most stocks–especially growth stocks–generally trend up over the long haul, so saying SELL often means betting against the odds and/or making a short-term timing call.
  • Stocks with excellent fundamentals don’t often go down just because they’re “expensive”–instead, they just get more expensive. So saying “SELL” based solely on valuation often sets the analyst up to be wrong.
  • The lack of SELL ratings makes SELL ratings sound like a complete condemnation of the company, to the point where it seems the analyst has a vendetta against it. The more polite way to tell people to sell, most folks on Wall Street whisper, is to say “hold”–or just ignore the stock altogether.
  • The issuance of a SELL rating often drives a stock down, hurting investors who own it. These investors will not usually say “thank you.” Instead, they’ll want your head.
  • Most investors are long-only, meaning they can only buy stocks, not short them. Thus, “SELL” ratings are only useful to hedge funds and investors who already own stocks.
  • Most companies refuse to talk to analysts who hit them with SELL ratings, thus reducing the analyst’s ability to gather information about the company.

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Wednesday, February 15th, 2012 news No Comments

the whole story, regardless of where you jump in

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/01/30/follow-the-saga-engadget/

Over the years, stories have become more than just single bursts of information. These days, there’s as much drama in the consumer technology world as there is sports, politics or your average episode of Days of our Lives. Take SOPA, for example. We’d be remiss of our duties here if we simply reported on what it was, without ever following up on protests, delays, judgments and other vitally important developments. In fact, it’s tough to think of too many stories covered today that don’t correspond with some sort of saga — even the departure of RIM’s co-CEOs represents just a single slice of a far larger tale. For those that follow this stuff 24/7, jumping in at any point in the story is no issue; piecing together the past with the present is second nature. But if you’re actually working during the day, hopping aimlessly into an ongoing saga mid-stream can be downright disorienting. Painful, even. We’ve been working hard to come up with an unobtrusive solution, and we think we’ve found it.

We’ve actually had our Follow The Saga functionality since January of last year — we quietly debuted it with the launch of Verizon’s iPhone 4 — but today’s iteration is far more interactive. We’ve been testing these out over the past few weeks, and today we’re happy to officially introduce them. If you see the badge shown after the break in any post that pops up here at Engadget, just give it a click to be taken to the full saga, and scroll up and down to see related stories before and after the one you happen to ! be looki ng at. We’re hoping it’ll be particularly helpful to those who happen to stumble upon a saga somewhere in the middle, but want to get caught up on what happened prior and where we stand now. As with everything we do, we’ll be continually tweaking and evolving the tool in the months ahead. Enjoy!

Psst… want to see it in action? Have a look under the body of this SOPA post to see how we got to where we are today.

Continue reading Introducing ‘Follow The Saga’: the whole story, regardless of where you jump in

Introducing ‘Follow The Saga’: the whole story, regardless of where you jump in originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 30 Jan 2012 14:18:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Tuesday, January 31st, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5880812/the-new-blackberry-ad-campaign-is-proof-rim-has-entirely-lost-it

The New BlackBerry Ad Campaign Is Proof RIM Has Entirely Lost ItSay hello to The Bold Team. Sadly, this animated foursome is RIM’s attempt to capture the youth market. They urge the younger generation to “Be Bold”. Something tells me it won’t work.

This pink and purple mess looks a bit like an advertising executive just vomited his late-night cocktail onto a page and presented it to RIM. “That’ll do,” he probably thought. “They’re shafted anyway.”

The Bold Team are “bravely stepping out of 2011 and into 2012 filled with unlimited possibilities”. If you care to know more about RIM’s answer to the Power Rangers, there are four of them. You want a quick run through their biographies? Sure, there’s:

GoGo Girl, The Achiever: “Saving the day with a brilliant strategy”
Justin Steele, The Advocate: “Always ready to stick up for his friends”
Trudy Foreal, The Authentic: “Not afraid to call it as she sees it”.
Max Stone, The Adventurer: “Able to jump out of a plane…”

Presumably Max Stone is inspired by the RIM employees who got drunk on that plane.

A company which is shedding customers quicker than the Costa Concordia lost passengers, seeing its stock price fall week-on-week, and drafting in replacement CEOs, you’d expect to put some effort into advertising. Obviously not. RIM is completely out of touch. [Mobile Syrup via Pocket Lint]

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Tuesday, January 31st, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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