click

Most Likely to Click on an Online Video Ad in Q3? The 65+ Demo

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/online/most-likely-to-click-on-an-online-video-ad-in-q3-the-65-demo-37570/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

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With a view completion rate index of 100.6, the 65+ crowd tied with the 55-64 group and kept pace with 18-24-year-olds (100.7).

A plurality 23% of ads targeted the 45-54 audience, although these viewers proved the least likely on average to click on an ad (index of 97.8), while being right on average in terms of completion rates. The next-most targeted demo, 35-44-year-olds (22% share of ads) were slightly more likely to click on an ad (index of 100.7) but less likely to complete one (99.1).

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Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013 news No Comments

Google adds confirmation click to mobile ads to combat accidental activation

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/12/14/google-adds-confirmation-click-to-mobile-ads-to-combat-accidenta/


Google adds confirmation click to mobile ads to combat accidental activation

Smartphone owners have learned to cope with the extra power drain in-app advertising can cause, but accidentally launching a web browser? That’s a frustration that lasts forever. Google’s hoping to mitigate the pitfalls of clumsy thumbs, however, by introducing two-step click-through for mobile ads. Text banners served through AdMob will now display a humble blue arrow on their starboard side — clicking here takes the reader directly to the advertiser’s preferred destination; touching anywhere else expands widens the blue square to coax users into giving the ad a confirmation click, just in case they fumbled the advertisement by mistake. The team’s preliminary tests show that confirmed ad clicks sport a notably higher conversion rate, indicating that folks who clicked through the ad actually meant to. Google says solving what it calls the “fat finger problem” will be beneficial to the ecosystem as a whole. We prefer to think of our fingers as grand.

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Via: tp://www.androidpolice.com/2012/12/13/google-adds-two-step-verification-to-admob-ads-to-prevent-accidental-taps/“>Android Police

Source: Google Mobile Ads Blog

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Friday, December 14th, 2012 news No Comments

Soon You’ll Be Able To Buy Wine Over Facebook

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-wine-gifts-with-robert-mondavi-winery-and-chandon-2012-11

girl drinking wine

How did we miss this small print during Facebook’s recent launch of Facebook Gifts? “Soon, you’ll also be able to send wine from Robert Mondavi Winery and Chandon,” the company said on its blog.

(Gifts is a new function in which, when someone has a birthday, users can click on a little gift icon and send them something nice.)

In fact, you can already send someone a Mr. Beer home brew kit from Facebook Gifts.

But it appears that booze of all kinds will soon begin flowing regularly within Facebook. It’s the perfect medium given that age verification — a constant bugbear for alcohol marketers — is already taken care of.

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Monday, November 19th, 2012 news No Comments

What Facebook’s Biggest Advertisers Say About ‘Invalid Clicks’ (FB)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/what-facebooks-biggest-advertisers-say-about-invalid-clicks-2012-11

zuckerberg

Facebook’s larger advertisers, unsurprisingly, aren’t willing to say much — on the record, at least — about the proposed class action lawsuit which claims up to 20 percent of pay-per-click advertising on the site comes from “invalid” clicks.

Facebook says the suit is bogus, and is fighting an appeal in the case.

One key issue in the case is Facebook’s refusal to allow its clicks to be audited by a third party like the IAB, the Media Ratings Council or Ernst & Young.

Speaking privately, the company’s clients and competitors tell us they are aware that Facebook is non-transparent when it came to its advertising business.

None of them believed Facebook was acting improperly. And none sympathized with the suit. One said, “We trust Facebook and know that they are always working to refine their filters and to identify invalid clicks.”

Another added, “I don’t think they’re ripping people off.”

However, they also said that because Facebook is so big it is able to play by its own rules in a way that might not be healthy .

“They don’t let you audit,” said one client. “It’s a little bit suspect. A bit of a conflict of interest. … You have to trust Facebook’s numbers.”

Another added, “They’re not playing by the rules everyone else is playing by. It’s definitely an issue that there’s this 800 pound gorilla out there that isn’t playing by the rules.”

One major issue for advertisers is that they can only observe Facebook’s clicks independently if they send traffic off the site! to thei r own web sites. As most campaigns are designed to send traffic to the advertisers’ Facebook page, those clicks remain inside Facebook – and thus invisible to outside analytics.

“A lot of campaigns are not sending traffic off site so there’s no way to check,” one client told us.

Another said, “If we are driving users to a Facebook page — then we rely on Facebook metrics (impressions, clicks, conversions, engagement …) as the click goes directly to the Facebook page and not through a redirect AND we can’t fire pixels on Facebook pages like we can on external sites.”

Shuman Ghosemajumder, Google’s former click fraud czar who is now vp/strategy at Shape Security, told us that he knows many of the team members at Facebook who are working on click validation. “They are investing heavily in this area,” he says. A third-party audit of clicks, however is a “non-trivial” event at a company, he says. It requires time and resources, and an outside company must come in and perform experiments with the internal engineers. Nonetheless, “they need to take this very seriously,” he says.

Related:

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Wednesday, November 14th, 2012 news No Comments

Actually, You Only Get To Use About Half The Storage On The Cheapest Surface Tablet (MSFT)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/microsoft-surface-storage-2012-11

The cheapest model of Microsoft’s new Surface tablet comes with 32 GB storage, twice that of the cheapest iPad.

But here’s why: According to Microsoft, the Surface’s operating system takes up nearly half that space, leaving you with only 16 GB to play around with. In contrast, Apple’s iOS operating system only takes up about 1 GB of space.

Here’s the full breakdown from Microsoft, which we originally saw on TNW:

surface rt operating system

In a Reddit AMA session a few weeks ago, Microsoft’s Surface team said that the 32 GB model would have about 20 GB of free space. It looks like you actually get a bit less than that.

So while 32 GB sounds like a good deal, keep in mind you’re only getting a bit more storage than you would get on a similarly-priced iPad.

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Monday, November 5th, 2012 news No Comments

Facebook’s Latest Move Shows How Hard It Is To Get People To Check In (FB)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-social-wi-fi-check-ins-2012-11

Facebook check-ins

Facebook might have found a way to get people to use a long-neglected feature: check-ins, where you announce to your friends where you are.

It is testing a new service that offers local businesses free Wi-Fi through a router. To get online, customers must either check in using Facebook or get a passcode.

Facebook will provide the router for free, but businesses must pay for the Internet connection.

How does this help businesses? The check-in offers two chances for them to get free promotion on Facebook.

When users check in, they post their location with the business’s name on their Timeline and on friends’ News Feeds.

After they check in and get access, they’re directed to the business’s Facebook page. If they click Like on that page, that action also gets broadcast.

Facebook, in turn, can try to get the business to buy ads that make these check-ins and Likes more prominent in the News Feeds of customer’s friends.

In order to access Facebook Wi-Fi, customers must first check in to the local business. After checking in, the router directs you to the business’s Facebook page, which may have deals or discounts.

Facebook tells us this actually started as a hackathon project. That’s why they’re only testing the service at a few local businesses for now. Back-of-the-envelope math suggests it would take a lot of ad spending to earn back the cost of the router.

In theory, this might be a threat to Foursquare, whose mobile app centers around check-ins. A lot of people worried about Foursquare when Facebook first launched check-ins in 2010.

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But the real problem that Facebook and Foursquare seem to face is apathy. Only 10 percent of adults use check-in services, according to a Pew Internet study conducted in May. For smartphone users, the number is a little higher at 18 percent. But so far, the prospect of deals and discounts hasn’t proved compelling for most people.

Even Foursquare has started talking about how people use its app without checking in to find local information.

Maybe free Wi-Fi will prove a better incentive.

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Friday, November 2nd, 2012 news No Comments

Here’s The REAL Error Rate For ‘Fat Finger’ Clicks

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/error-rate-for-mobile-ad-fat-finger-clicks-2012-10

3d iphone

Up to 50% of the impressions served on a static mobile banner ads are from accidental clicks or “fat finger” taps, according to GoldSpot Media‘s “Fat Finger Report.”

Accidental clicks or “fat finger” clicks are taps on mobile banner ads that happen after less than two seconds of engagement. That is, if a user closes the app or website within two seconds of clicking the ad then it is considered accidental.

GoldSpot Media, a digital ad management platform for online and mobile advertising, aggregated this data by analyzing millions of static and rich media banner impressions for campaigns delivered in Q3 2012, which used the GoldSpot ad platform.

GoldSpot also found that “fat fingers” are three times more likely to accidentally tap static banner ads than they are to click rich media banners. This is because static banner ads “appear to be part of the content, and may be tapped by the user unintentionally.” Whereas the 3D and animated qualities of Rich media are easier to differentiate from the app or website content.

Accidental Clicks on Rich Media Banner Ads vs. Static Banner Ads

Accidental Clicks on Mobile Ads

 

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Friday, October 26th, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://lifehacker.com/5939011/lovely-offers-photo+based-apartment-search-results-for-quickly-identifying-an-awesome-new-pad

Lovely Offers Photo-Based Apartment Search Results for Quickly Identifying an Awesome New PadCraigslist’s apartment search still sucks, but thankfully there are third-party developers out there making it better (even if Craigslist doesn’t like it). Previously mentioned Lovely is dedicated to making the apartment finding process easier, and this weekend they built a new search tool to help you find a great place with photo-based search results.

All you need to do is choose a city and a neighborhood to get started. From there you can narrow down your options by choosing the number of bedrooms you want in your apartment and a price range. As you make your selections, Lovely will provide you with a grid of photos depicting the various apartments available to you. From there you can click on anything appealing for more information and view the entire listing if you choose. While browsing on a map is great, sometimes you just want to pick the places that look the best before you worry too much about the exact location. Lovely’s new tool helps you do just that.

Lovely Labs

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Thursday, August 30th, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5939360/twitter-is-using-your-browsing-history-to-target-ads

Twitter is Targeting Targeted Ads to Become More Targeted (Updated)Twitter just announced that its letting advertisers create better, more targeted advertisements so you’ll actually see stuff you care about in your Twitter feed. It’s the way the Internet works in 2012—ads already know your tastes.

Twitter uses a variety of signals to determine what a Twitter user likes such as who you’re following and which content you click on. Here’s what they’ll now be doing for advertisements:

There are two flavors of interest targeting. For broader reach, you can target more than 350 interest categories, ranging from Education to Home and Garden to Investing to Soccer, as shown in the screenshot below. As an example, if you were promoting a new animated film about dogs, you could select Animation (under Movies and Television), Cartoons (under Hobbies and Interests), and Dogs (under Pets).

If you want to target more precise sets of users, you can create custom segments by specifying certain @​usernames that are relevant to the product, event or initiative you are looking to promote. Custom segments let you reach users with similar interests to that @​username’s followers; they do not let you specifically target the followers of that @​username. If you’re promoting your indie band’s next tour, you can create a custom audience by adding @​usernames of related bands, thus targeting users with the same taste in music.

It’s obviously not the worst thing in the world to have ads you might care about in your Twitter feed but it’s sort of eerie (like in Gmail) to see that ads know so much about you and your habits. YEAH I LIKE CAT VIDEOS, DOESN’T MEAN I WANT TO BUY PURINA ONE CAT FOOD. [Twitter]

Update: Article has been corrected to clarify that Twitter does not use your browsing history in advertisers’ targeted ads.

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Thursday, August 30th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5939360/twitter-is-using-your-browsing-history-to-target-ads

Twitter is Targeting Targeted Ads to Become More Targeted (Updated)Twitter just announced that its letting advertisers create better, more targeted advertisements so you’ll actually see stuff you care about in your Twitter feed. It’s the way the Internet works in 2012—ads already know your tastes.

Twitter uses a variety of signals to determine what a Twitter user likes such as who you’re following and which content you click on. Here’s what they’ll now be doing for advertisements:

There are two flavors of interest targeting. For broader reach, you can target more than 350 interest categories, ranging from Education to Home and Garden to Investing to Soccer, as shown in the screenshot below. As an example, if you were promoting a new animated film about dogs, you could select Animation (under Movies and Television), Cartoons (under Hobbies and Interests), and Dogs (under Pets).

If you want to target more precise sets of users, you can create custom segments by specifying certain @​usernames that are relevant to the product, event or initiative you are looking to promote. Custom segments let you reach users with similar interests to that @​username’s followers; they do not let you specifically target the followers of that @​username. If you’re promoting your indie band’s next tour, you can create a custom audience by adding @​usernames of related bands, thus targeting users with the same taste in music.

It’s obviously not the worst thing in the world to have ads you might care about in your Twitter feed but it’s sort of eerie (like in Gmail) to see that ads know so much about you and your habits. YEAH I LIKE CAT VIDEOS, DOESN’T MEAN I WANT TO BUY PURINA ONE CAT FOOD. [Twitter]

Update: Article has been corrected to clarify that Twitter does not use your browsing history in advertisers’ targeted ads.

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Thursday, August 30th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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