complexity

The Entire Advertising Industry Is Shifting To This Strategy

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/native-ads-2012-7

twitter promoted tweets ads

Native monetization is a fast growing form of digital advertising that is changing the complexion of the advertising industry in New York.

Native advertising refers to ad strategies ad strategies that allow brands to promote their content into the endemic experience of a site in a non-interruptive, integrated way.

From Twitter’s Promoted Tweets, to Facebook’s Sponsored Stories, to YouTube’s TrueView Video Ads, the major social platforms have doubled down on native ad formats.

Dozens of traditional and upstart publishers, such as Forbes, The Awl, Thought Catalog, and The Huffington Post are following suit. The growth of this form of advertising has affected all corners of the advertising ecosystem in New York ranging from creative and media agencies, to publishers, to startups and investors.

Native ads are attractive to brands because they allow their content to become part of the fabric of a website or app. For example, the main use of Twitter is to read and create Tweets, so to create an advertising experience that is native to the experience of their platform they built “Promoted Tweets.” This allows brands to be part of the main use case of the site, rather force brands to put their ads in easily ignored display ads sitting to the right of their Tweet stream or interruptive mediums like interstitials and video pre-roll ads that force a user to see them before being able to use the site.

 Native ads are fundamentally different from traditional online marketing mediums like display and pre-roll, as they are driven more by original brand content instead of traditional commercials, and by voluntary engagement and sharing instead of interruption.

As a result of the industry-wide shift to native monetization, creative and media agencies are creating new departments and roles to help brands create, distribute, and measure native content; New York publishers are rolling out their own native ad models; brands are aggressively experimenting with native ad campaigns; and investors are backing startups built on the native advertising vision.

Here are a few ways different NYC industries are being transformed by native advertising:

1)    Creative Agencies –Because native ad formats do away with many of the limitations of earlier ad formats – such as time constraints for pre-roll video ads, and size or content constraints on display and banner ads – creative agencies have been freed up to produce a vast new array of brand content. New York creative agencies like Mother, SS+K, TBWA, and Droga5, are continually producing creative that transcends the traditional commercial spot that people are forced to watch to standalone content that people actively choose to experience and share.

2)    Media Agencies – Native ad budgets won’t grow unless media agencies can measure their impact on brand reach, loyalty, and conversion. Facebook Likes, Re-Tweets and YouTube Views already pose a challenge for traditional media ROI analysis, and as new platforms emerge with native ad products, such as Twitter and Spotify, media agencies will have to further expand their research and analysis teams. To get ahead of this new morass of media complexity, many media agencies are re-structuring their organizations around social media and are deploying new tools and metrics to bring transparent buying and measurability to native advertising. Digitally-focused media agencies like Horizon, Razorfish and MEC, which recently announced a new proprietary tool called Crossmedia to improve their measurement capabilities across multi-media campaigns, are examples of agencies that are moving aggressively to evolve their organizations to be able to harness the complexity of social media measurement and maximize the opportunity of native ads.

3)    Venture Capitalists – As Microsoft’s recent multi-billion dollar writedown of aQuantive suggests, there are serious concerns about the future of traditional display advertising and investors are in turn going to take a hard look at any future investments that rely on display ad revenue. Conversely, investors like Fred Wilson, Partner at New York’s Union Square Ventures and one of the earliest proponents of native monetization, are invested in native ad platforms like Twitter and Foursquare.

      4) Startups – The New York startup scene is white hot. Native advertising is one of the biggest drivers of this growth, leading to huge acquisitions like Buddy Media, a social enterprise software company recently acquired by Salesforce for $689 million, and promising new companies like Percolate, a content marketing platform focused squarely on helping brands create content for the social web. Startups based in New York have a unique opportunity to work right around the corner from the heart of the advertising industry at a time when brands and agencies are hungry for new tools and ideas to help them maximize the opportunity with native ads. Both advertisers and publishers are looking for new partners to create new scalable advertising experiences that will make a genuine impact for their brands and bottom line, so expect to see more native ad-focused startups emerge in the next year.

5)    Publishers – Social content publishers are re-thinking the design of their sites and monetization models to be more native to their content experience. Hugely popular New York-based social publishers like The Cheezburger Network, Thought Catalog, The Awl, and Gawker have all been very active in experimenting with new forms of native ad formats.  To execute this evolution requires new site designers, editorial teams that can innovate and re-define the sponsored post model, and sales teams trained in selling native placement. As these companies continue to grow their audiences, innovate on the native ad model and come up with native ad solutions that can scale, much larger traditional media companies like Hearst, Time and Conde Nast are likely to take notice and explore native ad formats across their portfolio sites.

Dan Greenberg is the founder & CEO of Sharethrough, the native video advertising company. Dan has been honored as an AdAge “Media Maven” and was recently named to the Forbes “30 under 30″ list. You can find him on Twitter at @dgreenberg. 

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Monday, July 16th, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://lifehacker.com/5882209/five-best-ways-to-stream-live-tv

Five Best Ways to Stream Live TV Whether you’re looking for a way to catch the big game this weekend when you’re away from your living room, or you just like to catch live television when you’re trapped somewhere without either cable or a television, you have plenty of options to help you catch a broadcast on your mobile phone or your computer. Here’s a look at five of the best ways to tune in when you’re on the go.

Earlier in the week we asked how you tune into live television that you’re subscribed to on your mobile device or when you’re not in front of the big screen. You responded, and now we’re back to take a look at the top five, based on your nominations.

Photo by IK’s World Trip.

Five Best Ways to Stream Live TV

Orb/Orb Live

When you need to stream audio or video around the house, to your mobile device, or across the globe when you’re away from home, Orb can certainly deliver. We mentioned Orb several times, and it’s still a great way to stream your media from your computer to other devices in your home, or, if you’re willing to pay for an Orb appliance to connect to your cable box or HTPC, stream live TV or recorded TV to any other device on or off of your home network. Orb supports video up to 720p, and gives you the flexibility to watch live sports, prime time TV shows, or anything else that’s currently airing in your living room on your mobile phone, tablet, or laptop over Wi-Fi, 3G, or 4G when you can’t be in the living room to enjoy it. Pricing varies depending on whether you need hardware (between $79-$99 for the set-top box) to connect to your TV and home network, or you already have a TV tuner in your HTPC (the Orb Live and Orb Caster software are both free, but the mobile apps are $9.99.)


Five Best Ways to Stream Live TV

Slingbox

Where other live TV streaming solutions offer complexity, Slingbox offers elegant simplicity. The Slingbox from Sling Media is a set-top box that connects to your TV and your cable or satellite receiver that makes it easy for you to effectively log in to your TV at home and watch live TV on your computer or mobile device as though you were sitting in front of your TV. You can change channels, browse TV listings, and even set your home DVR to record TV that you won’t make it home in time to watch. The Slingbox comes in two flavors, the Slingbox Solo and the Slingbox Pro-HD (which predictably supports HD and additional devices connected to it) and will set you back $179.99 to $299.99 (not including extended support options). You’ll also need to drop $29.99 for the SlingPlayer app to control your Slingbox from your smartphone or tablet, but the price buys you one of the most feature-rich and hassle-free live TV streaming solutions on the market.


Five Best Ways to Stream Live TV

EyeTV

Elgato’s EyeTV line of TV tuners and live TV software were, for a long time, the only option for Mac users who were looking for an easy way to use their Macs as TV tuners or HTPCs. They’re not the only options anymore, but they’re certainly one of the best, and if you plug a TV source in to an EyeTV and then the EyeTV into your Mac via USB, you want watch live TV right there on your computer screen. Combine an EyeTV tuner or DVR with the EyeTV app on your mobile device, and you can stream live or pre-recorded TV on your mobile device when you’re out of the house. The EyeTV app will set you back $4.99 in the iTunes App Store for any iOS device, and the tuners vary in price from $99 to $199 depending on whether you need a DTV tuner, a DTV and HD tuner, a tuner with a DVR inside, or a Wi-Fi enabled tuner that can wirelessly stream TV to other devices in your home.


Five Best Ways to Stream Live TV

Vulkano Flow Box

The Vulkano Flow may not be one of the most well known set-top tuners on the market, but it’s definitely one of the most powerful. For $99.99, the Vulkano Flow is an easy to install and set up device that connects to your cable or satellite tuner, supports HD video, and your home network to allow you to wirelessly watch live TV on your iOS or Android device on your home network or when you’re away via 3G or 4G. You get complete control over your home TV, so you can switch channels, browse a built-in programming guide (that you don’t have to pay extra to view), and even connect to other video inputs like a DVR or HTPC and control that as well. Vulkano offers desktop players for Mac OS and Windows (Free), and mobile players for iOS, Android, and BlackBerry ($12.99.)


Five Best Ways to Stream Live TV

Hauppage WinTV

Hauppage is an old name in TV tuners, and the company is still going strong by offering a range of products to HTPC enthusiasts who want to build their own devices to stream, save, and watch live and recorded television and to people who would rather buy a set-top box to handle the streaming for them. Those of you who nominated the WinTV mentioned that you can easily install a WinTV tuner in your HTPC and download the WinTV application on your HTPC and iOS or Android device to stream TV from your HTPC to your device. Pricing varies depending on which tuner you’d like, whether you want HD video, and whether you want an internal or USB tuner to install at all or you’d just prefer a set-top box like the Hauppage Broadway ($199), but the WinTV Extend app you’ll need to stream from your Tuner will set you back $9.95, and the mobile apps are free (although they only support Wi-Fi.)


Now that you’ve seen the top five, it’s time to put them to an all out vote for the winner.

What’s The Best Method to Stream Live TV?

Honorable mentions this week go out to streaming TV sites like Justin.tv, which many of you said you use to stream your own TV shows to the web so you can catch them when you’re away from home, and to The NFL’s website, which many of you noted is indeed streaming the big game on their own. Finally, since we mentioned that the Department of Homeland Security had shut down FirstRowSports‘ primary domain, many of you made note of the fact that the site is still up and running on a different URL.

Have a favorite method that didn’t get the nominations needed to make the top five? Want to make a case for it, or for your favorite of the nominees above? Sound off in the comments below.

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Sunday, February 5th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Mark Cuban foretells Netflix demise, sees a future filled with on-demand video

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2010/05/07/mark-cuban-foretells-netflix-demise-sees-a-future-filled-with-o/

To call Mark Cuban eccentric would be akin to describing the ocean as wet, but what’s not so often acknowledged about the Dallas Mavericks owner is the sharp mind and commercial nous that have gotten him to the position of hiring and firing millionaire ball players. One of Mark’s recent blog posts, entitled “The future of TV … is TV,” got the attention of NewTeeVee, who sought to debunk his contention that VOD (video on demand) services from cable operators would become the primary means by which we consume digital media in the future. They cite the growing success story of Netflix’s digital distribution model, as well as the 12 million hours of March Madness video consumed via CBS’ web portal, in arguing that web streaming is indeed the great new hotness.

Mark’s response tackles Netflix head on, and points out that the company’s rapid growth is about to start working against it, with movie studios and other content providers likely to jack up prices and demand further concessions from the streaming service as it turns into a real competitor to cable companies. According to him, Netflix is presently getting its content at prices that are unsustainable, and his prognostication is that content owners seeking bigger levies — together with the expansion of VOD choice, which he sees as foolproof compared to the overwhelming complexity that web streaming entails — will lead to Netflix passing costs on to the consumers and losing out to cable operators. Irrespective of whether you agree with him, the whole exchange is well worth a read. Use the links below to get filled in.

Mark Cuban foretells Netflix demise, sees a future filled with on-demand video originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 07 May 2010 10:09:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink CNET  |  sourceBlog Maverick, NewTeeVee (1), (2)  | Email this | Comments

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Friday, May 7th, 2010 news 1 Comment

How Google Crunches All That Data

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5495097/how-google-crunches-all-that-data

If data centers are the brains of an information company, then Google is one of the brainiest there is. Though always evolving, it is, fundamentally, in the business of knowing everything. Here are some of the ways it stays sharp.

For tackling massive amounts of data, the main weapon in Google’s arsenal is MapReduce, a system developed by the company itself. Whereas other frameworks require a thoroughly tagged and rigorously organized database, MapReduce breaks the process down into simple steps, allowing it to deal with any type of data, which it distributes across a legion of machines.

Looking at MapReduce in 2008, Wired imagined the task of determining word frequency in Google Books. As its name would suggest, the MapReduce magic comes from two main steps: mapping and reducing.

The first of these, the mapping, is where MapReduce is unique. A master computer evaluates the request and then divvies it up into smaller, more manageable “sub-problems,” which are assigned to other computers. These sub-problems, in turn, may be divided up even further, depending on the complexity of the data set. In our example, the entirety of Google Books would be split, say, by author (but more likely by the order in which they were scanned, or something like that) and distributed to the worker computers.

Then the data is saved. To maximize efficiency, it remains on the worker computers’ local hard drives, as opposed to being sent, the whole petabyte-scale mess of it, back to some central location. Then comes the second central step: reduction. Other worker machines are assigned specifically to the task of grabbing the data from the computers that crunched it and paring it down to a format suitable for solving the problem at hand. In the Google Books example, this second set of machines would reduce and compile the processed data into lists of individual words and the frequency with which they appeared across Google’s digital library.

The finished product of the MapReduce system is, as Wired says, a “data set about your data,” one that has been crafted specifically to answer the initial question. In this case, the new data set would let you query any word and see how often it appeared in Google Books.

MapReduce is one way in which Google manipulates its massive amounts of data, sorting and resorting it into different sets that reveal new meanings and have unique uses. But another Herculean task Google faces is dealing with data that’s not already on its machines. It’s one of the most daunting data sets of all: the internet.

Last month, Wired got a rare look at the “algorithm that rules the web,” and the gist of it is that there is no single, set algorithm. Rather, Google rules the internet by constantly refining its search technologies, charting new territories like social media and refining the ones in which users tread most often with personalized searches.

But of course it’s not just about matching the terms people search for to the web sites that contain them. Amit Singhal, a Google Search guru, explains, “you are not matching words; you are actually trying to match meaning.”

Words are a finite data set. And you don’t need an entire data center to store them—a dictionary does just fine. But meaning is perhaps the most profound data set humanity has ever produced, and it’s one we’re charged with managing every day. Our own mental MapReduce probes for intent and scans for context, informing how we respond to the world around us.

In a sense, Google’s memory may be better than any one individual’s, and complex frameworks like MapReduce ensure that it will only continue to outpace us in that respect. But in terms of the capacity to process meaning, in all of its nuance, any one person could outperform all the machines in the Googleplex. For now, anyway. [Wired, Wikipedia, and Wired]

Image credit CNET

Memory [Forever] is our week-long consideration of what it really means when our memories, encoded in bits, flow in a million directions, and might truly live forever.

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Wednesday, March 17th, 2010 news No Comments

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