consumers

55% of Millennials Trying New Brands Priced Below Their Regular Brands

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/traditional/55-of-millennials-trying-new-brands-priced-below-their-regular-brands-37458/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

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For example, the survey results indicate that 55% of Millennials (18-34) are trying new brands priced below regular brands, as are 54% of families and 49% of Hispanics.

Youth may be more inclined than the average American to try new brands anyhow, according to recent research from Ipsos. But the IRI study shows that more than 4 in 10 are shopping multiple stores to find the lowest prices, with 45% of families and 41% of Hispanics concurring.

Finally, roughly 4 in 10 Millennials and families are using online resources to find coupons, though that figures drops to 30% among Hispanics.

About the Data: The Q3 survey was conducted between September 27 and October 3.

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Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013 news No Comments

Top 7 Reasons Why Mobile Ads Don’t Work — Study by Dartmouth Univ

source: http://www.adweek.com/news/technology/top-7-reasons-why-mobile-ads-dont-work-153202

Photo: Getty Images

A Dartmouth researcher’s study sheds light on the mobile Web and app users who don’t click on ads. On a high level from the study, here are the top seven reasons they steer clear of the ads on smartphones and tablets (with some Adweek commentary thrown in).

1. The screen is too small, per 72 percent of survey participants. Mobile marketers everywhere will want to bang their heads against the wall over that one. And for tablet marketers, the researcher believes most respondents were thinking of their smartphone usage more so than their time on an iPad or Nexus 7.

2. People are just too busy for ads, according to 70 percent surveyed. You mean on-the-go consumers don’t have time to kill? No shocker here, either—outside maybe actually not being No. 1.

3. After tapping an ad and going to the landing page, 69 percent of respondents hate it that they cannot easily return to the content they were reading or watching. This interfacing problem can probably be successfully addressed by technologists, can’t it?

<st! rong>4. Too hard to get online with cell phones, said 60 percent. There’s a 3G joke in here somewhere.

5. Per 54 percent, it’s too frustrating when mobile consumption is interrupted. From TV to T-Mobile, some things never change.

6. Ads take too long to load, stated 53 percent. Once again, this one seems fixable long-term on a technological level and can probably be creatively circumvented in the meantime.

7. Consumers are just not in the mood for ads, said 42 percent. Fantastic marketing content could change this attitude, couldn’t it?

At the same time, Praveen Kopalle, the Dartmouth marketing professor who put together the study, came to a bevy of other mobile-versus-Web-consumption findings. Many of them suggest that while mobile marketers have more opportunities to craftily target ads, they better hit on-the-go consumers’ sweet spots because those folks won’t be paying attention for very long.

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Thursday, October 17th, 2013 news No Comments

Consumers No Longer Associating Name Brands With Higher Quality

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/traditional/consumers-no-longer-associating-name-brands-with-higher-quality-36877/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

IntegerGroupM:A:R:C-Name-Brands-Quality-Perceptions-Sept201383% of Americans are either buying as the same amount of (48%) or more (35%) private label brands than last year, a figure which has held steady over the past couple of years, per new data from The Integer Group and M/A/R/C Research. Part of the challenge for name brands is that perceived advantages in areas traditionally considered to be their strong suits – such as innovation and quality – have eroded.

This year, just 29% of respondents said they believe name brands are better quality products. That’s down from 36% last year and 43% the year before. Private label acceptance in this area is particularly significant, as 54% of respondents cited quality as their top priority when shopping for everyday products.

Moreover, this year only a minority 45% of respondents believe that brands names offer more new products, varieties and innovations compared to store or private label brands. In 2010, a majority 56% felt that way.

Last year, a study by Ipsos found 7 in 10 consumers agreeing that store brands were either better than or about the same as national brands in terms of offering high-quality products. Similarly, most respondents at the time said that store brands were on equal or better footing when it came to offering products they trust (78%) and offering innovative products (67%).

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Tuesday, September 24th, 2013 news No Comments

Top Reasons Consumers Give For Marking Emails as Spam

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/online/top-reasons-consumers-give-for-marking-emails-as-spam-36897/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

Kentico-Top-Reasons-Marking-Email-as-Spam-Sept2013Kentico has released the results of a survey regarding consumers’ views of email marketing. While the company surveyed a relatively small sample of consumers (“more than 300″), some of the attitudes uncovered are intriguing. Among them: respondents are more likely to say they’d mark email from legitimate companies as spam because the companies email them too frequently (38%) than because the emails are unsolicited (34%).

Of course, there are various reasons for marking email as spam, and consumers likely have a number of them. In this case, it appears that the survey asked to choose a single reason. After those top 2 responses, 26% of respondents said they mark emails as spam when they don’t contain anything of interest. The remaining 2% said they do so when the emails seem shoddy with poor design and typos.

Frequency of emails has often been seen as the main culprit for unsubscribes (see here for an example), and it may be that consumers mark frequent emails as spam out of convenience, rather than unsubscribing. Recent research from Return Path, meanwhile, suggests that brands emailing less than once a week see better results than those emailing with more frequency.

Returning to the Kentico study, the results suggest consumer apathy towards email marketing’s progress over the years. In fact, the proportion believing email marketing has gotten worse (36%) over the past 5 years slightly outweighed the proportion believing it has gotten better (32%! ), with t! he remainder neutral.

Clutter may be a problem, as research has found that brands are sending more and more emails, with the average recipient receiving 416 commercial messages a month, according to one study. A plurality 37% of respondents to the Kentico study indicated that they “willfully” subscribe to 1-5 email lists, with 31% subscribing to 6-10 lists, 14% to 11-15 lists, 7% to 15-20 lists, and a brave 5% to more than 20 lists.

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Tuesday, September 24th, 2013 news No Comments

What Would Prompt Mobile Users to Share Their Personal Info With a Brand?

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/online/what-would-prompt-mobile-users-to-share-their-personal-info-with-a-brand-36901/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

mBloxMillwardBrown-Reasons-Mobile-Users-Would-Share-Personal-Info-Sept2013Privacy is a hot topic these days, and there have been several studies out of late examining the types of data consumers are willing to share with brands. Although a recent survey from TRUSTe found just 1 in 10 smartphone owners in the US willing to share their location information with an application, a new multi-country study [download page] from mBlox and Millward Brown finds that 43% of respondents are willing to share their location information with companies via their mobile device. What would prompt them to do so?

Asked why they would ever share their location (or other personal information) with a company using their mobile device:

  • 47% indicated they would do so to receive relevant offers or discount coupons;
  • 45% would to receive information or alerts that they have requested;
  • 36% would to resolve customer service issues;
  • 24% would to check-in or post on social networking sites; and
  • 6% would for another reason.

Slightly less than 1 in 5 said there would be no good reasons for sharing their information.

Interestingly, the survey – which was fielded among mobile users who had downloaded an app during the past 12 months – finds that 8 in 10 respondents feel that the act of downloading a company’s app to their mobile device also meant that they would be open to receiving location-based text or push notifications from the same company.

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Tuesday, September 24th, 2013 news No Comments

Most Americans Don’t Feel Like Marketers Understand Them

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/traditional/most-americans-dont-feel-like-marketers-understand-them-36863/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

Y&R-Consumer-Attitudes-Individuality-Identity-Sept2013Just 11% of Americans approve of the way people like them are portrayed in marketing and advertising, although that figure rises to 29% when including survey results from Brazil and China, according to recent research from Y&R. Part of the problem may be that consumers have “fluid” identities, according to the researchers, that see them a part of many seemingly disparate groups. Globally, 55% agreed that their age doesn’t define them, with a majority also agreeing that their identity is “a work in progress.”

The results suggest that one unifying characteristic among the consumers surveyed in the three countries is their strong view of individuality: 6 in 10 agree that people should be able to marry, live and work however they want; and about half agree that success is determined by the individual, not by others.

Complicating matters for marketers trying to segment individuals: what they say and what they feel may be different. The researchers conducted two studies to gauge conscious and unconscious attitudes: a quantitative online study, and an implicit measurement study measuring unconscious consumer attitudes.

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Monday, September 23rd, 2013 news No Comments

drag2share: Google’s AdID, an anonymous identifier for advertising, could replace the aging cookie

source: http://www.engadget.com/2013/09/18/google-adid-an-anonymous-identifier-advertising-cookie/?utm_medium=feed&utm_source=Feed_Classic&utm_campaign=Engadget&ncid=rss_semi

Google's AdID, an anonymous identifier for advertising, could replace the aging cookie

You know the drill: accept the cookie, delete the cookie, empty the cookie bin, and so on. Mostly, it’s an exercise used when attempting to get your mum’s PC to run a wee bit faster, but if you think about it, the cookie is one of the most archaic pieces of the world wide web that’s still in use today. Naturally, Google is swooping in in a bid to change the status quo, according to a new report from USA Today.

Essentially, the search giant is building an “anonymous identifier for advertising, or AdID, that would replace third-party cookies as the way advertisers track people’s internet browsing activity for marketing purposes.” Perhaps astoundingly, it sounds as if the project could benefit both consumers (by shielding true identities) and advertisers at the same time. Of course, pundits are concerned about the global leader in online advertising controlling the technology that tracks movements on the web, but to us, it sounds as if end users will get far more power over who sees what when compared to today’s cookies.

<p! >—
drag2share – drag and drop RSS news items on your email contacts to share (click SEE DEMO)

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Wednesday, September 18th, 2013 news No Comments

Americans Are Rekindling Their Dangerous Love For Credit

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/americans-are-rekindling-their-dangerous-love-for-credit-2013-9

credit card spendingFueled by a burgeoning economy, shoppers have slowly but surely rekindled their love affair with plastic. A new MasterCard analysis shows that in 2012, U.S. credit card volume grew by $172 billion year-over-year, an increase of 8.4%.

We’ve pretty much done a complete 180 since the onset of the recession. Back in 2008, Americans shifted more than $140 billion from credit to debt card spending.

You could say consumers are simply feeling more secure about their ability to handle credit card bills these days. But looking closer at the study, we found two dangerous signs that we could be getting in over our heads again.

More than half of credit users say they continuously carry a balance on their accounts and 54% of consumers say they use credit for rewards, up a full 9 points from 2008.

Credit lenders are incentivizing overspending and consumers are clearly taking the bait.

Already, we can see the effect rewards are having on credit use. The average credit card transaction is only $93, signaling that consumers are leaning on credit even for everyday purchases in order to get rewards.

Warning Signs

Credit perks are all well and good if you’re planning on paying your card down each month. But what’s the point in cashing in credit rewards if you’re dragging your credit score down and running the risk of paying late payment fees in the process?

There’s real danger in relying on credit cards just for a fe! w extra cashback points. First of all, carrying balance on your credit card is one of the easiest ways to lower your credit score. You’re basically telling lenders that you’re willing to rack up charges without having the means to pay them off in quick fashion.

“The amount of debt a consumer carries tends to be highly predictive of future credit performance because the amount a person owes has a direct impact on her or his ability to pay all their credit obligations on time each month,” says Barry Paperno, consumer operations manager for myFICO.com. “While having debt doesn’t automatically put someone in a high-risk category, as balances increase, the probability of having difficulty making payments on time each month increases.”

In an ideal world, everyone would pay down their credit card balance in full each month. Realistically speaking, most experts recommend keeping your total debt load at one-third of your available credit limit.

We’d recommend going even further. A recent FICO report found that people with the highest credit scores typically carried debt loads less than 7% of their total limits.

A good rule of thumb: If you’re about to use a credit card, just ask yourself if you’d be making that purchase if you were using cash instead. If the answer is no, chances are you’re better off keeping that card parked in your wallet.

 

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Monday, September 16th, 2013 news No Comments

More Than 6 in 10 Americans Aged 13-33 Said to Stream Video Weekly

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/television/more-than-6-in-10-americans-aged-13-33-said-to-stream-video-weekly-36629/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

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While GfK says that 51% of the US population watches streaming video weekly, it’s important to note that the survey was limited to 13-54-year-olds. According to the Census Bureau, there were almost 82 million Americans aged 55 and older as of July last year. Given the age trend in streaming video viewing, it’s likely that audiences in the 55+ segment would be smaller, dragging down the overall average.

Nevertheless, the data shows that on a directional basis, streaming video is becoming more mainstream. A variety of connected devices are contributing to the growth:

  • 9% of TV households are using streaming-ready 7G game systems weekly to stream;
  • 5% of TV households are using a streaming-capable HDTV to stream weekly;
  • 5% of consumers aged 13-54 are using a tablet to watching streaming video weekly; and
  • 4% of consumers are using a smartphone to do so.

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Sunday, September 15th, 2013 news No Comments

One-Quarter of Web Traffic Lands on Pages With 4 or More Display Ads

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/direct/one-quarter-of-web-traffic-lands-on-pages-with-4-or-more-display-ads-36655/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

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Specifically, 76% of impressions land on pages containing 1-3 display ads, 16.4% on pages with 4-5 ads, 3.5% on pages with 6-7 ads, and 3.1% on pages with more than 10 ads. (The exact numbers for pages with 8-9 ads weren’t included as they were fractional.)

What’s interesting about those findings (beyond the data itself) is that traffic skewed slightly towards pages with a higher density of ads. That’s because 80.8% of the pages surveyed contained 1-3 display ads – but only 76% of impressions went to those pages.

Directly placed ads (which have the highest viewability and lowest incidence of fraud) also won out in terms of clutter. 86% of directly placed ads were on pages with 1-3 ads, while networks, exchanges, and hybrids all ranged between 46.4% and 48.7% of ads placed on pages with that few ads.

Returning to the Adblade surve! y, a majo! rity of respondents indicated that the most obtrusive banner position is the middle of the page (66%), with fewer pointing to the top of the page (19%), right side of the page (10%) and end of the article (4%). 31% prefer websites to have sponsored third-party articles (advertorials) with no banner ads, compared to 24% who don’t. The remaining 45% don’t care.

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Sunday, September 15th, 2013 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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