conversion rate

E-Commerce in Q2: Tablet Traffic as Valuable as Traffic From Computers

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/topics/e-commerce/e-commerce-in-q2-tablet-traffic-as-valuable-as-traffic-from-computers-36679/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

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Computers led with an AOV of $115.74, compared to $113.15 for tablet tablets and $112.73 for smartphones.

[Editor’s note: Monetate’s previous report covering Q1 had found tablets converting at a higher rate than computers, while data from this latest report indicates that the opposite was true for Q1. The discrepancy owes to a different random sample of clients being used for each quarterly report.]

Among tablets, the iPad continued to boast the highest conversion rate (2.6%) during the second quarter, with Android (2%) also out ahead of the Kindle Fire (1.6%). The iPad also sported the highest average order value ($114.18), outpacing Android ($101.22) and Kindle Fire ($91.84).

The iPhone re-assumed the lead in conversion rates among smartphones, just exceeding 1%, and putting some distance between itself and Android (0.88%) and Windows (0.77%) phones. i! Phone tra! ffic also ended up with the highest average order value, of $114.45, followed closely by Windows ($112.36) and Android ($109.52).

All told, smartphones (9.7%) and tablets (12.4%) together accounted for more than 1 in 5 e-commerce visits during Q2, up from about 15% a year earlier. In the past year, tablets have overtaken smartphones in terms of e-commerce traffic share, with the gap between the devices steadily increasing.

The iPad continues to dominate tablet e-commerce traffic to the tune of 90.6% share, while the iPhone also retains its lead (62.7% share) of smartphone visits.

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Tuesday, September 17th, 2013 news No Comments

Millennials Still Spend the Vast Majority of Their Retail Dollars In-Store

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/topics/e-commerce/millennials-still-spend-the-vast-majority-of-their-retail-dollars-in-store-36364/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

NPDGroup-Millennials-Retail-Spending-Behavior-Sept201381% of Millennials’ retail spending occurs in brick-and-mortar stores, reveals The NPD Group in a new study covering shopping activity from May 2012 to April 2013. In fact, slightly more than half of Millennials (13-33) shop in-store during a typical week, and the group accounts for more than one-third of all US shopping visits. Interestingly, though, Millennials are less likely to make a purchase while they’re in-store than older generations, and they spend more per visit online than in a brick-and-mortar store.

Millennials have a 57% in-store conversion rate (percentage of shoppers who make a purchase), according to the study, significantly behind the corresponding rates for Gen Xers (34-48; 66%), Boomers (49-67; 69%) and Seniors (68+; 72%). That could be related to an increased propensity for showrooming among the younger group, even if recent research has shown webrooming to be more prevalent than showrooming among Millennials.

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Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013 news No Comments

How Do Landing Page Objectives Differ for B2Bs vs. B2Cs?

source: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/How-Do-Landing-Page-Objectives-Differ-B2Bs-vs-B2Cs/1010161

The greatest percentage from both groups considered conversion to be the most useful metric for analyzing the performance of their landing pages, cited by 57% of B2B respondents and 69% of B2C respondents. Clickthrough rate (CTR) was also important to B2B marketers, significantly more so than to B2Cs.

This disparity is likely a reflection of the differing objectives of B2Bs and B2Cs for their landing pages. More than three out of five B2B marketers sought to increase leads from the landing page—thus a click would be worth quite a bit to these respondents. By contrast, only 34% of B2Cs showed interest in generating leads from the landing page.

B2C marketers were far more interested in the lead-to-customer conversion rate, as well as increasing direct sales from the landing page, again underscoring that closing the deal remains the unparalleled end goal for these companies.

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Monday, August 26th, 2013 news No Comments

PPC Professionals: 2014 Will Be About Conversion Rate Optimization

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/topics/financial/ppc-professionals-2014-will-be-about-conversion-rate-optimization-35963/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

HanapinMktg-PPC-Professionals-Focus-in-2014-Aug2013“2014 will be the Year of Design,” declares Hanapin Marketing as the result of its new survey [pdf] of PPC professionals. The study, fielded among “hundreds of search marketing professionals,” found that 85% will focus more on conversion rate optimization next year, compared to just 2% who will focus less on this area. Around 6 in 10 plan to focus more on entering new ad networks. 

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Sunday, August 18th, 2013 news No Comments

Facebook drives most social B2B traffic, but Twitter is top for conversions: report

Source: http://econsultancy.com/us/blog/61999-facebook-drives-most-social-b2b-traffic-but-twitter-is-top-for-conversions-report

In fact, Twitter achieves a higher conversion rate (2.17%) than the average for all channels combined (1.6%) including organic and paid search. In comparison, LinkedIn and Facebook achieve conversion rates of 0.8% and 0.74% respectively.

But when it comes to the number of pageviews per visit, LinkedIn is the top performer with 2.48, followed by Facebook (1.94) and Twitter (1.51).

Social media breakdown

Overall though, organic search massively outperforms social in terms of traffic and leads.

Organic search drives 41% of traffic to B2B sites, of which Google accounts for 90%, while social contributes an average of only 5% of all traffic and leads.

B2B conversion rates by source 2012

The data in this report was collected using Optify’s visitor and lead tracking software and includes only US .com sites with between 100 and 100,000 monthly visits.

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Wednesday, January 30th, 2013 news No Comments

Google adds confirmation click to mobile ads to combat accidental activation

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/12/14/google-adds-confirmation-click-to-mobile-ads-to-combat-accidenta/


Google adds confirmation click to mobile ads to combat accidental activation

Smartphone owners have learned to cope with the extra power drain in-app advertising can cause, but accidentally launching a web browser? That’s a frustration that lasts forever. Google’s hoping to mitigate the pitfalls of clumsy thumbs, however, by introducing two-step click-through for mobile ads. Text banners served through AdMob will now display a humble blue arrow on their starboard side — clicking here takes the reader directly to the advertiser’s preferred destination; touching anywhere else expands widens the blue square to coax users into giving the ad a confirmation click, just in case they fumbled the advertisement by mistake. The team’s preliminary tests show that confirmed ad clicks sport a notably higher conversion rate, indicating that folks who clicked through the ad actually meant to. Google says solving what it calls the “fat finger problem” will be beneficial to the ecosystem as a whole. We prefer to think of our fingers as grand.

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Via: tp://www.androidpolice.com/2012/12/13/google-adds-two-step-verification-to-admob-ads-to-prevent-accidental-taps/“>Android Police

Source: Google Mobile Ads Blog

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Friday, December 14th, 2012 news No Comments

Guess What Percent Of Black Friday Online Sales Came From Twitter Referrals?

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/black-friday-online-sales-from-twitter-referrals-2012-11

New Twitter Logo

What percent of online sales on Black Friday do you think came from Twitter referrals?

How about Facebook?

While you’re pondering those questions, here are some other factoids from a report on Black Friday online sales by IBM:

  • The average Black Friday online shopper bought 5.6 items per order. That’s down 13% from last year. It’s also down 40% from Friday, November 16th, a week earlier. Hard to know what to make of that.
  • The average shopping “session” length was 6 minutes and 39 seconds. That’s down about 10% from last year. Compare that to the average hellish shopping session in a physical store, and you’ll see why ecommerce is continuing to grow as a percent over overall retail sales.
  • The “conversion rate” of online shoppers–the percentage of those who visited the site who actually bought something–was 4.58%. That’s up 9% from last year.
  • Mobile devices (smartphones and tablets) accounted for 16% of sales. That’s up from 10% last year.
  • Mobile devices accounted for 24% of site traffic. That’s up from 14% last year.
  • iPads accounted for 10% of site traffic, up from 5% last year.
  • iPhones accounted for 9% of site traffic, up from 5% last year.
  • Android phones and tablets accounted for 5.5% of site traffic, up from 4% last year.

The key observations here would seem to be:

  • Mobile is ! continui ng to grow rapidly as a percentage of traffic and sales, but it’s not taking over by any means.  6 years into the smartphone era, with smartphones now accounting for more than 55% of U.S. handsets, traffic to mobile sites (including traffic from tablets) is still less than 25% of overall traffic.
  • Apple devices continue to crush Android devices in terms of commerce engagement. Android users just don’t seem to do all that much with their gadgets.

And now to social referrals…

It wasn’t long ago that many people were arguing that Facebook was eventually going to be bigger than Google. Word of mouth, after all, is the most powerful form of marketing known to man. And people lived on Facebook, so they would soon be shopping on Facebook. And so forth.

Well, so far, anyway, that ain’t happening.

  • Only 0.68% of Black Friday online sales came from Facebook referrals–two-thirds of one percent. That was a decline of 1% from last year.

And how about Twitter?

A couple of years ago, people were excited about Twitter’s potential as a commerce platform, too.

But Twitter’s impact on ecommerce, it seems, is zero.

Not “basically zero.”

Zero.

  • Commerce site traffic from Twitter accounted for exactly 0.00% of Black Friday traffic. That was down from 0.02% last year.

So much for the idea that Twitter or Facebook’s business models are going to have much to do with commerce.

SEE ALSO: Here’s Why You Will Instantly Dump Your Cable Company To Get Google Fiber

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Monday, November 26th, 2012 news No Comments

Facebook outlines its ad targeting strategy on one handy page, presents a complex privacy picture

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/10/01/facebook-outlines-its-ad-targeting-strategy-on-one-handy-page/

Facebook privacy padlockTo say that Facebook has to tread lightly around privacy issues is an understatement, especially with a targeted ad push underway. Rather than navigate that minefield once more, the social network hopes to skip it entirely by posting an overview of how the ad system tracks habits while retaining our anonymity. For the most part, Facebook walks the fine line carefully. Its Facebook Exchange auction system relies on a unique, untraceable browser ID to target ads to specific people without ever getting their identity; both a mechanism targeting ads beyond Facebook and a Datalogix deal to track the ad conversion rate use anonymous e-mail address hashes that keep advertisers happy without making the addresses readable to prying eyes. The initiative sounds like it’s on the right course, although there’s caveats at work. Opting out of any Facebook Exchange ads requires tracking down individual ad providers, which isn’t likely to result in many of us leaving the ad revenue stream. Likewise, those who’d object even to the completely anonymous ad profiling don’t have a say in the matter. With those concerns in mind, it’s doubtful there will be many significant objections in the future — Facebook knows its advertising money train can only keep churning if its members are comfortable enough to come along for the ride.

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Facebook outlines its ad targeting strategy on one handy page, presents a complex privacy picture originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 01 Oct 2012 16:16:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012 news No Comments

This Stat Reveals The Incredible Potential Of Pinterest

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/this-stat-reveals-the-incredible-potential-of-pinterest–and-why-amazon-google-or-facebook-should-buy-it-2012-7

Pinterest image two

If online retailers invest the time to develop a presence on Pinterest, the site can become a source of traffic that converts Web users into new customers at an incredible rate.

That’s according to data from Bloomreach, which helps online stores optimize for social and search.

Bloomreach put together a nice infographic on this topic that we have pasted below.

Even if online stores do not invest in their Pinterest presence, the conversion rate on traffic from Pinterest (1.02%) far outstrips traffic from Google Image Search (.54%) and Twitter (0%).

Pinterest traffic does not convert as well as regular Google search traffic. 1.62% of visits from Google search result in sales.

But, Bloomreach marketing boss Joelle Kaufman says that low conversion rate is mostly due to the fact that, so far, ecommerce sites are ignoring the potential of Pinterest.

She says that an online store putting “manual effort and investment” into Pinterest can get a 9% conversion rate on traffic coming from the site.

9% also beats the conversion rate on traffic from Facebook – 1.13%.

Kaufman says it takes a some amount of work for an online store to get the most out of Pinterest. She says one store that is a Bloomreach client has actually hired a full-time “pinner.” 

The other important caveat: Pinterest – and all social sites – still send a very little amount of traffic to online stores. 

If Pinterest can keep growing – it just hit 19 million users – it could turn into an incredibly valuable commerce engine, something Amazon, Facebook, or Google should buy.

Here’s the Bloomreach infographic:

Search and Social conversion and volume

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Wednesday, July 11th, 2012 news No Comments

the economics of advertising sucks, but it will suck a lot more soon

it’s a simple matter of supply and demand. Let’s do a thought exercise.

1.  eMarketer forecasts that retail e-commerce will grow roughly 10% per year for the next few years. This means that the total “pie” of people spending online will only grow by an average of 10% per year. Note that sales is (or should be) the goal of advertising. So that’s why we are looking at e-commerce sales and comparing it to online advertising because both are completed in the same medium and we can eliminate cross-media uncertainties and breakdown of tracking.

e-commerce

2. online advertising is still exploding with trillions of pageviews per month, thanks to social networks which throw off ungodly numbers of pageviews when people socialize with others. The Compete chart below shows the top social networks which rely on banner advertising (impression-based advertising) to make revenues. Notice that just Facebook and Myspace alone generate 115 BILLION pageviews a month. And if you consider that Facebook shows 3 ads per page, that would be 250+ BILLION impressions per month served by Facebook alone. Furthermore, the rate at which pageviews grow is 250% – 1,000% per year, depending on the site in question.

pageviews

3. In the online medium, we have end-to-end tracking from the advertising (banner impression) through to the sale (e-commerce). The banner is served (impressions); a percent of users click on it to go to a site (click through rate – CTR); a percent of those make their way through the site and end up completing a purchase online (conversion rate). Those users who are looking for something and who are considering buying something will be online searching and researching. Those are the ones who are likely to click on banner ads, compared to others who are online to do something else, like write email, socialize with friends, etc.  And if the purchase is their ultimate end-goal (to make a purchase) we have a farily reliable indicator of the growth in not only such interest but also the completion of the task — namely, e-commerce, which grows at 10%.

4. Now, if the number of people who will click grows that 10%, but the number of advertising impressions grows at a slow 250%, the ratio of clicks to impressions drops dramatically because the denominator is growing 25X faster than the numerator. Serving more ads simply will not get the amount of e-commerce to grow significantly faster. The point of diminishing returns has been reached and passed, so incremental ad impressions are ignored and useless. The number of people who will end up buying will not increase significantly faster. And given the tough economic climate the amount of sales may actually decline before it goes up again.

5. If we generalize this back to all retail commerce, it grows at an EVEN slower pace than ecommerce. When you compare this to the dramatic increase in ad impressions and the shift from traditional channels (TV, print, radio – whose impressions and audience sizes are dwindling) to online channels (portals, news sites, social networks – whose impressions and audience sizes are skyrocketing) again the ratio of sales to available advertising drops dramatically. This is a measure of the effectiveness of advertising (sales  divided by advertising spend). It was already small — it sucked — and it will get dramatically smaller soon — it’ll suck more soon.

A way to mitigate this “sucking” is to peg advertising expenditures on a success metric which is an indicator of user intent — cost per click — versus a traditional indicator of reach and frequency — ad impressions served — which from the above is NOT an indicator of consumers’ intent to purchase.  This way, advertisers only pay when someone clicks. Those “someones” click when they are looking for something and are more likely to complete a purchase than those who don’t click.

“CPC banner advertising” anyone?

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Sunday, March 15th, 2009 digital No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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