Core

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5892170/does-this-zip+together-chair-bend-the-laws-of-physics/gallery/1

Does This Zip-Together Chair Bend the Laws Of Physics?At first glance Igor Lobanov’s Wormhole chair looks like an impossible object that could only exist as a computer physics simulation. But once you wrap your head around its zip-together design, it not only seems plausible, but also pretty genius.

Each chair is composed of two flat, but rounded, frame pieces that each fold into a C-shape and completely zip together. So they end up creating a self-supporting place to sit that looks like someone has torn a wormhole into another dimension. It won a much-deserved Red Dot design award, but is sadly still just a concept waiting for an unnamed yet popular Swedish maker of flat-pack furniture to license the design. [Igor Lobanov via Core77]

Does This Zip-Together Chair Bend the Laws Of Physics?
Does This Zip-Together Chair Bend the Laws Of Physics?

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Sunday, March 11th, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5892170/does-this-zip+together-chair-bend-the-laws-of-physics/gallery/1

Does This Zip-Together Chair Bend the Laws Of Physics?At first glance Igor Lobanov’s Wormhole chair looks like an impossible object that could only exist as a computer physics simulation. But once you wrap your head around its zip-together design, it not only seems plausible, but also pretty genius.

Each chair is composed of two flat, but rounded, frame pieces that each fold into a C-shape and completely zip together. So they end up creating a self-supporting place to sit that looks like someone has torn a wormhole into another dimension. It won a much-deserved Red Dot design award, but is sadly still just a concept waiting for an unnamed yet popular Swedish maker of flat-pack furniture to license the design. [Igor Lobanov via Core77]

Does This Zip-Together Chair Bend the Laws Of Physics?
Does This Zip-Together Chair Bend the Laws Of Physics?

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Sunday, March 11th, 2012 news No Comments

A Really Scary Chart For Yahoo (YHOO)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-2011-11

This chart shows why Yahoo quickly needs to figure out a new path for itself.

For all of its success, at its core, Yahoo is still an email business. People use Yahoo email and then from there land on its other properties.

The rise of smartphones and iPads is a problem for Yahoo. On those devices, email is a native application that doesn’t encourage people to checkout Yahoo’s pages.

As you can see in this chart, web-based email usage is cratering for people aged 12-34. Unless Yahoo figures out a way to wean itself from email dependence, it’s going to be in trouble.

What is the future of Yahoo? Our own Nicholas Carlson has a bold idea

chart of the day, web-based email use by age year over year, nov. 18, 2011

Please follow SAI on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

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drag2share – drag and drop RSS news items on your email contacts to share (click SEE DEMO)

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Saturday, November 19th, 2011 news No Comments

Apple vs Microsoft vs Sony [Graphs]

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/fCC_TUnak8c/research-and-development-apple-vs-microsoft-vs-sony

The core of any long-standing technology company is research and development. Here’s how Apple, Microsoft and Sony’s last decade of spending stack up.

Note that the first graph shows research and development as a percentage of revenue (to scale the spending by company, since revenues differ so greatly). This next graphic can help you conceptualize the revenue and R&D gap:

A Few Interesting Notes:

• Now, Microsoft spends about 17% of their revenue on R&D. Sony spends about 8%. Apple spends less than 4%.

• If you were to break down the amount of R&D that goes purely to physical (non-software) products sold by Apple and Sony, Sony would spend about $11.5 million per product while Apple would spend about $78.5 million per product. (Of course, that’s rolling the cost OS X and iPhone OS development into Macs and the iPhone, which could be seen as inflating their per product spending.)

• Microsoft just spends a lot of money in R&D, period—about $9 billion last year in generalized research (that often doesn’t lead to specific products). In terms of percentage growth over the last decade, Apple’s R&D has grown the most (nearly quadrupled) while Sony’s has grown the least (not quite doubled).

In light of these bare numbers, is it any surprise that Sony is struggling the most to capture the hearts and minds of a public hungry for gadgets?

Sources:

Apple
Apple Public Relations
Apple Investor Relations
Apple Insider 2004
Apple Insider 2005
Apple Insider 2006
Apple Insider 2008
Mac Observer
Microsoft
Microsoft Investor Relations
Sony
Sony Investor Relations

Research by David Chaid

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Monday, March 8th, 2010 news No Comments

Aardvark Publishes A Research Paper Offering Unprecedented Insights Into Social Search

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/IMDRrISRf-8/

In 1998, Larry Page and Sergey Brin published a paper[PDF] titled Anatomy of a Large-Scale Hypertextual Search Engine, in which they outlined the core technology behind Google and the theory behind PageRank. Now, twelve years after that paper was published, the team behind social search engine Aardvark has drafted its own research paper that looks at the social side of search. Dubbed Anatomy of a Large-Scale Social Search Engine, the paper has just been accepted to WWW2010, the same conference where the classic Google paper was published.

Aardvark will be posting the paper in its entirety on its official blog at 9 AM PST, and they gave us the chance to take a sneak peek at it. It’s an interesting read to say the least, outlining some of the fundamental principles that could turn Aardvark and other social search engines into powerful complements to Google and its ilk. The paper likens Aardvark to a ‘Village’ search model, where answers come from the people in your social network; Google is part of ‘Library’ search, where the answers lie in already-written texts. The paper is well worth reading in its entirety (and most of it is pretty accessible), but here are some key points:

  • On traditional search engines like Google, the ‘long-tail’ of information can be acquired with the use of very thorough crawlers. With Aardvark, a breadth of knowledge is totally reliant on how many knowledgeable users are on the service. This leads Aardvark to conclude that “the strategy for increasing the knowledge base of Aardvark crucially involves creating a good experience for users so that they remain active and are inclined to invite their friends”. This will likely be one of Aardvark’s greatest challenges.
  • Beyond asking you about the topics you’re most familiar with, Aardvark will actually look at your past blog posts, existing online profiles, and tweets to identify what topics you know about.
  • If you seem to know about a topic and your friends do too, the system assumes you’re more knowledgeable than if you were the only one in a group of friends to know about that topic.
  • Aardvark concludes that while the amount of trust users place in information on engines like Google is related to a source website’s authority, the amount they trust a source on Aardvark is based on intimacy, and how they’re connected to the person giving them information
  • Some parts of the search process are actually easier for Aardvark’s technology than they are for traditional search engines. On Google, when you type in a query, the engine has to pair you up with exact websites that hold the answer to your query. On Aardvark, it only has to pair you with a person who knows about the topic — it doesn’t have to worry about actually finding the answer, and can be more flexible with how the query is worded.
  • As of October 2009, Aardvark had 90,361 users, of whom 55.9% had created content (asked or answered a question). The site’s average query volume was 3,167.2 questions per day, with the median active user asking 3.1 questions per month. Interestingly, mobile users are more active than desktop users. The Aardvark team attributes this to users wanting quick, short answers on their phones without having to dig for anything. They also think people are more used to using more natural language patterns on their phones.
  • The average query length was 18.6 words (median of 13) versus 2.2-2.9 words on a standard search engine.  Some of this difference comes from the more natural language people use (with words like “a”, “the”, and “if”).  It’s also because people tend to add more context to their queries, with the knowledge that it will be read by a human and will likely lead to a better answer.
  • 98.1% of questions asked on Aardvark were unique, compared with between 57 and 63% on traditional search engines.
  • 87.7% of questions submitted were answered, and nearly 60% of them were answered within 10 minutes.  The median answering time was 6 minutes and 37 seconds, with the average question receiving two answers.  70.4% of answers were deemed to be ‘good’, with 14.1% as ‘OK’ and 15.5% were rated as bad.
  • 86.7% of Aardvark users had been asked by Aardvark to answer a question, of whom 70% actually looked at the question and 38% could answer.  50% of all members had answered a question (including 75% of all users who had ever actually interacted with the site), though 20% of users accounted for 85% of answers.
Information provided by CrunchBase


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Tuesday, February 2nd, 2010 digital No Comments

a company that has a concerted effort in social marketing

http://www.webkitchen.be/2009/02/18/adobe-on-twitter/

Adobe on Twitter
By Serge Jespers 18 February 2009 at 11:02 am
I thought it was a good idea to compile a list of Adobeans on Twitter. It was quite surprising to see how big this list turned out and I’m pretty sure there must be even more of us on Twitter. If you know of someone not on the list, feel free to add them in the comments!

Flash Platform evangelism

Duane Nickull: http://twitter.com/duanechaos
Tom Krcha: http://twitter.com/tomkrcha
Mihai Corlan: http://twitter.com/mcorlan
Greg Wilson: http://twitter.com/gregorywilson
Enrique Duvos: http://twitter.com/eduvos
Daniel Dura: http://twitter.com/ddura
Kevin Hoyt: http://twitter.com/parkerkrhoyt
Andrew Shorten: http://twitter.com/ashorten
Lee Brimelow: http://twitter.com/leebrimelow
James Ward: http://twitter.com/jlward4th
Ryan Stewart: http://twitter.com/ryanstewart
Serge Jespers: http://twitter.com/sjespers
Raghu: http://twitter.com/raghunathrao
Harish: http://twitter.com/hsivaram
Anirudh: http://twitter.com/anirudhs
Sujit: http://twitter.com/sujitg
Mihai “Miti” Pricope http://twitter.com/mpricope
Cornel Creanga http://twitter.com/cornelcreanga
Terry Ryan: http://twitter.com/tpryan
Flash Platform

Michele Turner: http://twitter.com/mturner
Robin Charney: http://twitter.com/Rcharney
Mike Chambers: http://twitter.com/mesh
AIR

Ethan Malasky: http://twitter.com/emalasky
Rob Christensen: http://twitter.com/robchristensen
Christian Cantrell: http://twitter.com/cantrell
Flex

Matt Chotin: http://twitter.com/mchotin
Cocomo

Nigel Pegg: http://twitter.com/nigelpegg
Fang Chang: http://twitter.com/fkchang
Varun Parmar: http://twitter.com/vparmar230
Pixelbender

Kevin Goldsmith: http://twitter.com/KevinGoldsmith
Samantha Bailey: http://twitter.com/upperleftcorner
Adobe Core Tech

Jim Hong: http://twitter.com/jimhong
John Metzger: http://twitter.com/metz123
Kevin Stewart: http://twitter.com/kstewart
Mike Houser: http://twitter.com/tharkad
ColdFusion

Adam Lehman: http://twitter.com/adrocknaphobia
Products

AIR: http://twitter.com/air
Pixelbender: http://twitter.com/pixelbender
Flash Platform: http://twitter.com/Flash_Platform
ColdFusion: http://twitter.com/coldfusion
Buzzword: http://twitter.com/Buzzword
Adobe Reader: http://twitter.com/Adobe_Reader
Dreamweaver: http://twitter.com/dreamweaver
Spry: http://twitter.com/AdobeSpry
Developer relations

Ed Sullivan: http://twitter.com/esulliva
Rachel Luxemburg: http://twitter.com/rlux
Ted Patrick: http://www.twitter.com/AdobeTed
John Dowdell: http://www.twitter.com/jdowdell
Stacy Sison: http://www.twitter.com/ssison
Creative Suite evangelists

Paul Burnett: http://twitter.com/pburnett
Karl Soule: http://twitter.com/KarlSoule
Greg Rewis: http://twitter.com/garazi
Jason Levine: http://twitter.com/Beatlejase
Rufus Deuchler: http://twitter.com/rufusd
Flash Catalyst

NJ: http://twitter.com/rictus
Rob Adams: http://twitter.com/robadams
Cory West: http://twitter.com/corywest
Adobe After Effects

Dan Wilk: http://twitter.com/DanielWilk
Michael Natkin: http://twitter.com/michaelnatkin
Chris Prosser: http://twitter.com/cprosser
Open source

Dave McAllister: http://twitter.com/dwmcallister
Creative Suite

Doug Winnie: http://twitter.com/sfdesigner
Scott Fegette: http://twitter.com/sfegette
Marc Kubishta: http://twitter.com/kubischta
Connect

Mark Blair: http://www.twitter.com/markblair
Randah McKinnie: http://www.twitter.com/randah
Guillaume Privat: http://www.twitter.com/gprivat
Brant Strand: http://www.twitter.com/BStrand
Adobe Nordics

Anna Bouveng: http://twitter.com/annabou
Mattias Jonsson: http://twitter.com/mjonsson
Andreas Hollstrom: http://twitter.com/hollstrom
Adobe UK

Emma Wilkinson: http://twitter.com/emmawilkinson
Adobe Netherlands/Belgium

Klaasjan Tukker: http://twitter.com/ktukker
Bert Hagendoorn: http://twitter.com/berthagendoorn
Adobe Usergroup NL: http://twitter.com/adobeusergroup
Adobe Romania

Bogdan Ripa http://twitter.com/bogdanripa
Alexandru Costin http://twitter.com/acostin
Irina Huzum http://twitter.com/irinah
Adrian Spinei http://twitter.com/aspinei
Cosmin Lehene http://twitter.com/clehene
Andrei Dragomir http://twitter.com/adragomir
Sorin Sbarnea http://twitter.com/sbarnea
Mihaela Barbu http://twitter.com/mihabarbu
Adrian Tanase http://twitter.com/atanase
Horia Galatanu http://twitter.com/horiag
Ovidiu Eftimie http://twitter.com/eovidiu
Gelu Blanariu http://twitter.com/gelu11
Gabriel Dobritescu http://twitter.com/GabiD
Catalin Anastasoaie http://twitter.com/acatalin
Dragos Georgita http://twitter.com/drageo2000
Remus Stratulat http://twitter.com/rstratulat
Cristian Ivascu http://twitter.com/ivascucristian
Adobe Germany

Sven Doelle: http://twitter.com/sdoelle

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Wednesday, February 18th, 2009 digital, marketing No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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