correlation

America Drinks So Much Soda, They Literally Had To Expand This Chart To Fit It In

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/american-soda-consumption-a-huge-outlier-2013-9

This chart – taken from a new study by Credit Suisse titled “Sugar consumption at a crossroads” – shows a general correlation between GDP per capita and soda consumption per capita.

In other words, as countries get richer, they tend to increase their soda consumption.

The U.S. is clearly the most extreme outlier. Soda consumption per capita in America is way more than the relationship to GDP per capita would suggest.

Note that the U.S. is such an outlier that Credit Suisse literally had to expand this chart to include it. Without the U.S., the range of the y-axis wouldn’t even have to go up to 160.

Annual global soda consumption versus GDP per capita

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Thursday, September 12th, 2013 news No Comments

drag2share: Negative Buzz On Social Media Can Cause Sales To Plummet

source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/businessinsider/~3/HrA-7wV6Cpk/negative-social-media-sentiment-hurts-sales-2013-6

McKinsey: Negative Social Media Buzz Can Affect Sales (AdAge)
The consulting firm McKinsey & Co. discovered that bad buzz for an unnamed telecom client hurt sales by 8%. Initially the firm couldn’t find any correlation between social media buzz and sales when analyzing overall data changes, or by applying an algorithm to define sentiment. However, when the firm “hand tabulated” sentiment in social media comments — in other words, once humans read through social media comments — the insights surfaced


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Wednesday, June 12th, 2013 news No Comments

CHART OF THE DAY: Barack Obama’s Monster Online Advertising Campaign

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-political-ad-campaigns-2013-2

comScore has a new report out about the state of web properties. Most of it is stuff we’ve covered in the past. Google dominates search, Facebook is a popular site, etc.

In the middle of the report, this chart really jumped out at us. It compares Barack Obama’s online display ads to Mitt Romney’s display ads. The gap between the two is stunning. We’re not going to say anything about the correlation between online spending and winning an election, we just can’t believe the gap between the two candidates.

Chart of the day shows display ad impressions for the Obama and Romney campaigns during the 2012 Presidential elections cycle. February 2013

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Thursday, February 14th, 2013 news No Comments

Check Out The Correlation Between Market Volatility And Google Searches For ‘Gold’

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/awesome-google-labs-chart-shows-gold-and-volatility-go-together-2011-12


This chart from The Economist shows just how correlated popular interest in gold and market craziness are.

A great reminder that market data has a broad definition and comes from diverse sources.

(H/t to Ben Malbon at Google Labs.)

Fear Indices By Ben Malbon

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Thursday, December 29th, 2011 news No Comments

TV and Streaming Negative Correlation Continues

Source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/uncategorized/tv-and-streaming-negative-correlation-continues-19767/

Continuing a trend first reported in Q1 2011, the heaviest at-home streamers consume slightly less TV, while the lightest TV users are the heaviest streamers, according to [download page] an October 2011 report from Nielsen. Results from “The Cross-Platform Report” indicate that streaming is still a highly concentrated behavior, with 83% of all streaming taking […]


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Tuesday, October 25th, 2011 news No Comments

lift in search due to paid TV advertising

List of 2009 Superbowl spots on AdAge.com

http://adage.com/superbowl09/article?article_id=134136

Lift in search is a great indicator of interest. Modern consumers may be inspired by TV ads, but they usually go online to do more research for themselves, to inform their own purchase decision. The following examples show the lift in search after Superbowl commercials or for launch of products like Subway Footlongs. The use of unique, made-up words makes it easier to detect lift in search (see related post: made up words are great for tracking buzz and search volume ). There is now a correlation between offline paid advertising and online behaviors of modern consumers that can be tracked and ultimately related to sales.

What is harder to do is track lift in search from smaller TV media buys or from terms which are generic — e.g. American Express OPEN, Proctor & Gamble’s TAG (men’s deoorant), etc. And furthermore, people may or may not remember the brand name itself and may type in a more general search query — e.g. “talking baby” instead of” e-Trade” or “dancing lizards” instead of “SoBe LifeWater.” And most people usually forget to type in special URLs specified in the ads. So the opportunity is to 1) use made-up words which can be used to detect lift in search and 2) search-optimize around other more generic terms that people may search for if they remembered the ad, but did not remember the brand name itself.

key learnings include:

1. only the superbowl TV ads generates enough awareness to drive lift in search volume detectable above the noise or normal levels

2. made up words are useful in correlating paid advertising and subsequent online actions (e.g. search) because most users forget or are too lazy to type special URLs

3. is is always better to have real analytics from the site to see when paid campaigns hit; site analytics will also reveal more information about users including demographic information, what they are looking for, and even whether they “convert” to a sale or a desired action — like print off a coupon, etc.

Notice the January spikes for several of the examples below — these are their Superbowl ads in action. But also notice how sharp the spikes are — most of them go back to prior levels within 1 – 3 days (see related post: the ephemerality of the Superbowl halo )

Source: Google Insights for Search

footlongs

jackinthebox

dennys

ecoimagination

godaddy1

lifewater

drinkability

etrade

cash4gold

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Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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