culture

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/vip/~3/XKH9hGo4bm8/file+sharers-buy-30-percent-more-music-than-non+sharers

File-Sharers Buy 30 Percent More Music Than Non-SharersA massive public policy study has revealed that on average file-sharers buy 30 percent more music than their non-sharing counterparts. That suggests that the record labels’ self-declared enemies are in fact their best customers.

The study, known as the Copy Culture Survey, was carried out by the non-partisan American Assembly, and the results were teased yesterday. It’s based on thousands of in-depth telephone interviews across the US, and it’s probably one of the most thorough reviews of media sharing habits to be undertaken.

The results, which seem to fly in the face of assumed record label wisdom, show that file-sharers buy 30 percent more music than their non-sharing counterparts. Interestingly, it also points out that offline copying is far more prevalent than online music piracy.

However, it’s also worth pointing out that self-confessed P2P file sharers reported having larger music collections. So, it might not be all too surprising that music lovers, with bigger music collections, also buy more music: a taste for media consumption encourages both file sharing and purchasing.

That, along with the news that offline piracy is a bigger concern, is something the record labels need to wrestle with. [American Assembly via Torrent Freak]

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Tuesday, October 16th, 2012 news No Comments

21 Crazy Facts About The Unbelievably Corrupt Olive Oil Industry

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/fake-olive-oil-2012-1


Olive Oil

Olive oil has played a prominent part in Mediterranean culture for over 2,000 years and is beloved by foodies the world over.

However, the industry has a dirty little secret.

A lot of the “Italian extra virgin olive oil” isn’t what it says on the tin. Sometimes its not extra virgin, sometimes its not Italian — and sometimes it’s not even made from olives.

Here’s what you need to know about one of the world’s most lucrative criminal endeavors.

Olive oil is far more expensive than other oils, but surprisingly easy to fake.

(Source).

The fake industry seems to have almost as long a history as the real industry.

In the past merchants used to mix the oil with lard.

(Source)

It’s probably because of how valuable it is — way back in ancient Rome, per-capita consumption of olive oil was as much as fifty liters every year.

“People were prepared to spend the same amount of money on olive oil back then as they do on petroleum today.”

Nigel Kennell a specialist in ancient history, tells the New Yorker’s Tom Mueller.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Thursday, January 19th, 2012 news No Comments

There’s Only One Way To Make A Ton Of Money And Be Happy Selling Your Start Up

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/theres-only-one-way-to-male-a-ton-of-money-selling-your-start-up-2012-1


Venture Capital Ad

There is a common belief that venture capital has become a necessity to get start-ups off the ground.

The seemingly endless flow of funds is very appealing to the up-and-coming company looking to sling-shot themselves to instant growth.

While VC funding can give an important vote of confidence and is absolutely necessary for large infrastructure projects, there’s another side to VC funding— it can actually become a huge hindrance. As I’ve discussed before, skipping venture capital can leave your company with the freedom to grow in a sustainable way, creating more value for all stakeholders.

This means when you do sell – as my company AdoTube did recently— you are able to reap all the rewards of selling a healthy profitable company while being a big part of its future. Read below for the 5 reasons why skipping the VC can leave you with more money and probably more importantly a better company legacy.

1.       VCs just want their return

Venture capitalists have a portfolio of investments consisting of multiple start-ups, and therefore only care about average portfolio results. On the other hand, founders have all their eggs in one basket. Not only is this company their brainchild, but it is also their savings on the line. While founders are interested in the eventual payout, providing a product or service that consumers are excited about can be even more important. This focus on the long-term can lead to a greater eventual pay-out as well as a better company legacy.

2.       It’s easy to waste VC money, diminishing overall value

It is easy to overspend when it is not your money. When a small company comes across millions of venture capital, a lot of that cash can get thrown out with the bath water. Keeping the company small and growing it with your own sweat, blood and hard earned cash can lead you to be thriftier in your decisions. When AdoTube started, we made sure every purchase would earn us back revenue, otherwise why waste the money? Ultimately, this allowed us more value for our investment and helped us get a better return.

3.       VCs go big or go bust

Multiple rounds of VC can put founders in a situation where the company either becomes extremely successful or goes bust. Venture Capitalists’ are looking for the big payday, and if the instant pay-out is not immediately apparent, the company can come to a screeching halt. Founders, on the other hand, can take their time building the company up growing it organically. Without venture capitalists looking for their end return, there is still a lot of middle ground available to time a company’s growth spurt with the market.

4.       VCs don’t care about company culture

VCs aren’t incentivized to make deals that are best for the company and the founders. They are incentivized to sell for the most money. The problem is that while every founder dreams of retiring to the Caribbean after they sell, the reality is that their role with the company is often far from over. Founders are often needed to stay on board to steer transitions or integrations are also often the best person to run the newly acquired company. Culture is paramount in making sure all of this happens smoothly and benefits everyone.

5.       VCs don’t know what’s best for the company

Venture Capitalists don’t understand your business like you do. They study revenues and look for synergies with other companies. VCs can even value companies differently depending on how they might merge with another. Valuing a company based on this can take away from the goals of founders, forcing companies to work more like a widget factory than a company. A simple sale could also mean the instant death of your company, destroying all the value that you created (just talk with the guys at Foursquare). While the VCs walk away with a pay-day the company that you spent years creating is gone in an instant.

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Thursday, January 12th, 2012 news No Comments

Education Spending Doesn’t Solve Education Problems

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/education-spending-doesnt-always-mean-great-graduation-rates-2012-1


Education spending varies dramatically from state to state, and there are distinct regional differences. The desert West, the old cotton South and the northern Plains states spend the least per-student on elementary and secondary education. 

But spending by itself doesn’t necessarily create great results. Though Utah spends the least per-pupil on education annually, it isn’t near the bottom in graduation rates. The District of Columbia spends almost twice the national average per pupil but graduates just 55 percent of its students.

spending per pupil by state

DON’T MISS: the opinions at ‘THE GREAT DEBATE: What’s Wrong With Education In America?’ >

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Saturday, January 7th, 2012 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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