death

Adobe Gives Up On Flash For Android (Which Means It Gives Up On Flash For Mobile) (ADBE, GOOG)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/adobe-flash-not-on-android-41-2012-6

Kill Adobe Flash guns

Adobe says it will not develop Flash for the newest version of Android.

This all but ends Flash on smartphones, notes Chris Ziegler at The Verge.

When the iPad came out, Steve Jobs famously trashed Flash for mobile.

Afterwards Apple’s rivals used Flash as a selling point for their phones and tablets.

Apple saw the death of Flash coming, and now its rivals look a little silly.

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Friday, June 29th, 2012 news No Comments

How One Twitter User Broke The News Of Whitney Houston’s Death An Entire Hour Before The Press

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/how-one-twitter-user-broke-the-news-of-whitney-houstons-death-an-entire-hour-before-the-press-2012-2


When news spread Saturday night of Whitney Houston‘s passing, it was the AP who had the first official statement from Houston’s publicist confirming the singer’s death.

But an entire hour before that, Twitter user Brittany J. Pullard (aka @BarBeeBrit) was the first person to tweet the news, according to the below graph posted by Twitter, courtesy of @isaach.

Twitter Chart Whitney

@BarBeeBritt, who resides in Los Angeles and enjoys the Hollywood club scene, as evident by her Twitter feed, tweeted at 4:02pm PST to her then-799 followers:

WHitney Tweet

The tweet only received three retweets and @BarBreeBritt never revealed how exactly she heard the news, but Twitter user @AjaDiorNavy quickly had specific details of Houston’s passing at 4:15pm PST that weren’t released to the public until nearly 24 hours after the initial incident.

Twitter

Once the AP tweeted the official statement from Houston’s publicist at 4:57pm PST, rapper Lil Wayne quickly expressed his condolences and received 29,000 retweets, according to Mediabistro.

Other celebrities voiced their sympathies as well, but after Lil Wayne, the top tweets went to:

Justin Bieber (15,000 retweets): “just heard the news. so crazy. One of the GREATEST VOICES EVER just passed. RIP Whitney Houston. My prayers go out to her friends and family.”

Nicki Minaj (9,000 retweets): “Jesus Christ, not Whitney Houston. Greatest of all time,” as well as tweeting a vintage photo of the late singer alongside Michael Jackson.

Katy Perry (8,000 retweets): “So devastating. We will always love you Whitney, R.I.P.”

As if there were any doubt, it appears Twitter truly is the fastest news source. Sorry, TMZ, solid effort.

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Wednesday, February 15th, 2012 news No Comments

EMV in, magnetic strips out

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/01/31/mastercard-reveals-roadmap-for-our-electronic-payment-future-em/

MasterCard reveals roadmap for EMV electronic payments It’s been over fifteen years since MasterCard, Visa and Europay developed EMV technology to make your credit cards more secure, but it has yet to really catch on here in the US. However, MasterCard has created a master plan to help usher in the EMV era and sound the death knell for the magnetic strip. Why? The EMV infrastructure is far more fraud-resistant because each transaction is authenticated dynamically using cryptographic algorithms and a user-specific PIN. That’s why MasterCard plans to help build out the EMV POS infrastructure by April of next year and have its secure e-payment system functioning at ATMs, online and with its myriad mobile payment options as well. For now, the nuts and bolts of how the credit card firm plans to bring its plan to fruition are few, but more details will be forthcoming, and there’s a bit more info at the source and PR below.

Continue reading MasterCard reveals roadmap for our electronic payment future: EMV in, magnetic strips out

! MasterCard reveals roadmap for our electronic payment future: EMV in, magnetic strips out originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 31 Jan 2012 05:42:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Tuesday, January 31st, 2012 news No Comments

There’s Only One Way To Make A Ton Of Money And Be Happy Selling Your Start Up

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/theres-only-one-way-to-male-a-ton-of-money-selling-your-start-up-2012-1


Venture Capital Ad

There is a common belief that venture capital has become a necessity to get start-ups off the ground.

The seemingly endless flow of funds is very appealing to the up-and-coming company looking to sling-shot themselves to instant growth.

While VC funding can give an important vote of confidence and is absolutely necessary for large infrastructure projects, there’s another side to VC funding— it can actually become a huge hindrance. As I’ve discussed before, skipping venture capital can leave your company with the freedom to grow in a sustainable way, creating more value for all stakeholders.

This means when you do sell – as my company AdoTube did recently— you are able to reap all the rewards of selling a healthy profitable company while being a big part of its future. Read below for the 5 reasons why skipping the VC can leave you with more money and probably more importantly a better company legacy.

1.       VCs just want their return

Venture capitalists have a portfolio of investments consisting of multiple start-ups, and therefore only care about average portfolio results. On the other hand, founders have all their eggs in one basket. Not only is this company their brainchild, but it is also their savings on the line. While founders are interested in the eventual payout, providing a product or service that consumers are excited about can be even more important. This focus on the long-term can lead to a greater eventual pay-out as well as a better company legacy.

2.       It’s easy to waste VC money, diminishing overall value

It is easy to overspend when it is not your money. When a small company comes across millions of venture capital, a lot of that cash can get thrown out with the bath water. Keeping the company small and growing it with your own sweat, blood and hard earned cash can lead you to be thriftier in your decisions. When AdoTube started, we made sure every purchase would earn us back revenue, otherwise why waste the money? Ultimately, this allowed us more value for our investment and helped us get a better return.

3.       VCs go big or go bust

Multiple rounds of VC can put founders in a situation where the company either becomes extremely successful or goes bust. Venture Capitalists’ are looking for the big payday, and if the instant pay-out is not immediately apparent, the company can come to a screeching halt. Founders, on the other hand, can take their time building the company up growing it organically. Without venture capitalists looking for their end return, there is still a lot of middle ground available to time a company’s growth spurt with the market.

4.       VCs don’t care about company culture

VCs aren’t incentivized to make deals that are best for the company and the founders. They are incentivized to sell for the most money. The problem is that while every founder dreams of retiring to the Caribbean after they sell, the reality is that their role with the company is often far from over. Founders are often needed to stay on board to steer transitions or integrations are also often the best person to run the newly acquired company. Culture is paramount in making sure all of this happens smoothly and benefits everyone.

5.       VCs don’t know what’s best for the company

Venture Capitalists don’t understand your business like you do. They study revenues and look for synergies with other companies. VCs can even value companies differently depending on how they might merge with another. Valuing a company based on this can take away from the goals of founders, forcing companies to work more like a widget factory than a company. A simple sale could also mean the instant death of your company, destroying all the value that you created (just talk with the guys at Foursquare). While the VCs walk away with a pay-day the company that you spent years creating is gone in an instant.

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Thursday, January 12th, 2012 news No Comments

The Agonizingly Slow Decline Of Live TV

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-the-decline-of-live-tv-2012-1


It seems you can’t follow the tech industry today without being bombarded with reports heralding the impending death of television as we know it. While we believe the television model will eventually be disrupted, there’s no evidence of any imminent collapse. Instead, the likely scenario is of a very slow decline, with TV remaining an amazingly large and profitable business for many many years to come.

A new survey from Deloitte indicates viewers are engaging with that model in new ways, with bad implications for the network’s ad sales.  When asked how they watched their favorite show, 71% of respondents chose live TV, down from 87% three years ago.  Some of the biggest winners? DVR, on demand, and the show’s internet site.

What does it mean? Consumers are wising up that you’re no longer chained to a show’s air date and if you have the patience to wait 30 minutes you can skip all the ads.  The real big problem, however, is that these are engaged consumers with intent. In other words, exactly the kind of people advertisers want to be reaching.   

Deloitte: Live TV Decline


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Wednesday, January 11th, 2012 news No Comments

1 in 3 Viewers Despises Television And Wants To See It Die

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/poll-results-1-in-3-viewers-despises-television-and-wants-to-see-it-die-2011-12


tv death

We recently polled Business Insider readers on their attitudes to paying for cable and satellite TV, and we asked for your comments on the future of television itself.

The survey was prompted by the news that a generation of “cord-nevers” and “cord-cutters” is forming — young people who don’t want to pay for cable TV because their laptops and mobile devices provide plenty of free video.

By late Friday, 910 votes had been cast and the result was overwhelming:

  • One third of you (307) said you had already given up pay TV and were not going back.
  • Only 94 voters said they paid for basic cable.
  • Another 103 owned up to buying premium TV service.
  • Those low numbers were equalled by the 95 voters who said they could not ever imagine watching regular TV again.

Here are the full results:

tv death

(The live poll is still open, incidentally.) Obviously, the poll is biased: It’s a self-selecting audience of people who are already getting their news from the web.

Meet the “cord-haters”

Having said that, it indicates that “cord-nevers” may not be the TV industry’s main problem. Rather, judging by the comment boards underneath both the poll and the original story about the death of TV, it is the “cord-haters”: People who actively despise traditional television with its clutter of irrelevant advertising and brainless programming. They are overjoyed that the web now offers an alternative way to watch shows and movies at a fraction of the cost.

The Credit Suisse report identified new technology as the culprit that is now eating TV’s business. But as far as B.I. readers are concerned, it’s not just about the ease of watching movies on an iPad. Rather, it’s that they find TV to be of such low quality that they just don’t want to watch any more of it. Only now has new technology allowed them to watch shows and movies without all of TV’s baggage, such as paying for 500 channels when you really only watch about 10.

Here are some comments from the cord-haters (more here):

Steven: The thing I hate about TV is you only watch a couple stations 99% of the time, but you pay for 150+ stations.

dargoola: This year I cut most of the digital premium channels with on demand add-ons because I never have time to watch them.

There’s a core Of TV channels I watch but it’s shrinking. I’m getting more of my news from the Internet, i blog a lot, and spend more time socially on the net. But TV is still it for the pure pleasure of vegging out and being entertained.

realchuck: I’ve stopped paying some 5 years ago. I installed a ‘seedbox’ with a friendly 3rd-world country hosting provider and just leech torrents (automatically). It costs me some $50 per month including unlimited traffic. So I get TV-shows on the next day, auto-downloaded, and any blu-ray movie – also on the next day. I don’t have to respect any delays imposed by the assholes in the industry.

flubber: TV will fail because of the parent companies and advertisers. How many infomercials do we need?
How many times do they need to cut to commercial during a football game? Quite frankly I do not watch a lot of TV anymore because the amount of real content being aired is a joke and the amount of commercials is just downright insulting. I download everything or watch it on the net.

Dean Wormer: The traditional TV folks are stuck. But they think this is about Netflix, Hulu etc. It’s not. Their product stinks. It’s been this way for years and its getting worse. Hulu is just methadone to get you off the crack pipe.

Krissy: Let us be real here, most regular network TV on now is pure unadulterated shite.

iWonder: Cable isn’t what it used to be. I had cable primarily for channels like Discovery, Science and History but now it seems those networks are being overrun by the same trash programming that took over the big networks a decade ago. Cable isn’t worth it now, 150+ channels and nothing worth watching, that’s why I’m done with it.

jasno: I abandoned broadcast TV because of the incessant commercials. Even on the discovery channel it’s too much. Worse, the commercials are pretty much never for anything that I might possibly buy. For example, I am never going to buy a Chevy Silverado pickup, or any truck, but I have been subjected to about 97,391 commercials for pickup trucks.

Some readers defended TV, saying it still played a useful role in their lives:

rusty syringe: Gave it up for awhile but came back this year. Direct TV’s free Sunday Ticket offer was to good to pass up.

As with most guys I know, if it weren’t for ESPN, NFL, and NBA I wouldn’t get cable. Sports is all I watch on TV.

Frank Castle: I’ve tried all the streaming services and the image quality is crap. With Comcast I have a crystal clear 1080 signal with Dolby digital sound. I have no desire to gather everyone around the laptop to view a show. All these services also are geared to the solo viewer. What do you do when Mom wants to watch HGTV, I’m watching a game, the kids have on disney channel. Your telling me running all those sevices seperately is going to be cheaper then another cable connection?

SEE ALSO: The Facebook Advertising Hall Of Fame: Here’s Who Is Nailing It On The Social Network

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Monday, December 12th, 2011 news No Comments

Guess What The Biggest Topic On Facebook Was This Year

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/boonsri-dickinson-guess-what-the-biggest-topic-on-facebook-was-this-year-2011-12


The death of Osama bin Laden.

10 percent of all status updates (in English) mentioned Osama bin Laden in the days following his death, according to a Facebook blog outlining the top ten global trends in 2011.

Coming in second was Green Bay Packers beating the Pittsburgh Steelers in the Super Bowl.

Charlie Sheen was winning in March, if you recall.

Each month engagement centered around the hottest current events. For instance, conversations about the Royal Wedding were really popular during April. Mentions of the marriage shot up 600-fold, according to the Facebook post.

This is what your status updates revealed:

Facebook Top Ten trends

The blog post also looked at the memes that emerged this year.

In it, you’ll see planking — you know, where people lie down in an unusual place. It hit a spike after Max Key, the son of New Zealand Prime Minister John Key uploaded a photo to Facebook, then celebrities gave the meme a second wind, but then it just sort of disappeared.

If you don’t know what “lms” is or “tbh” — then you’re clearly not spending enough time on Facebook.

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Wednesday, December 7th, 2011 news No Comments

Coupon Redemptions Grow 27%

Source: http://feeds.marketingcharts.com/~r/marketingcharts/~3/D3SJYD6L0qE/

Following a leveling-off period from 2006-08, coupon redemptions grew by 27% in 2009, according to analysis by The Nielsen Company.

News of the Coupon’s Death is Greatly Exaggerated After reaching a peak of 4.6 billion redemptions in 1999 (according to Inmar), annual coupon use by US consumers sank to a low of 2.6 billion for the three-year […]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/marketingcharts/~4/D3SJYD6L0qE" height="1" width="1"/>

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Wednesday, April 14th, 2010 news No Comments

Change or Die [Music]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5481545/record-labels-change-or-die

It’s a lousy time to be a record label. Profits are tanking, bands are angry—OK Go just ditched EMI—and YouTube and BitTorrent changed the game. Still, some labels are transforming themselves to help musicians in the digital age.

“Change or Die” may sound like hyperbole, or an idle threat, but for the music business, the two alternatives have never been more real. EMI may very well go extinct in the coming months, and all of the major labels are fighting losing battles. But all is not lost.

The traditional role of a record label, in the broadest sense, is to bankroll a band until they start making lots of money, at which point the label gets to keep most of it. They own the master recordings a band makes, and by taking on this ownership they put all of their resources behind selling said recordings.

This setup makes sense when bands lacked the wherewithal to produce and record their own albums and when manufacturing and distributing physical copies of albums and marketing said albums costs hundreds of thousands of dollars. It also makes sense when a popular album will sell millions of copies at $15 a pop.

But that’s definitely not the case now. Record stores are dying at an alarming rate, and fewer and fewer people are buying CDs every day. It’s safe to say that the current generation of teenagers has never perused record stores as a normal activity; it’s all downhill from here for physical music sales. And FM radio isn’t doing too hot either. In short, everything that the music industry has known to be true for the last few decades is quickly turning to dust. Big labels can still bank on country, R&B and pop acts, but the bottom has already fallen out on alternative groups and other internet-friendly genres. And that’s just the beginning.

The Old, Dead Way of Doing Business

The way bands operate has changed so much in the last decade that what a label can provide and what bands require of a label has changed drastically, faster than labels have been able to adapt.

Manufacturing and distribution used to be the cornerstone of a label’s business; every major label owned its own plants to make the albums and also dealt with shipping the albums worldwide. Today, only Sony still owns plants that manufacture CDs, with the other three big labels outsourcing manufacturing to them. But they all still have reps who have to go out to record stores and make sure that their albums are getting proper shelf space. They have to deal with defects and returns. There are lots of resources required to deal with the manufacture and distribution of a physical product, but that physical product is quickly headed towards irrelevancy.

The biggest music stores are now virtual, so there’s no need for someone to go gladhand every Sam Goody manager so they give you endcap space for Use Your Illusion II. The iTunes Music Store sells 25% of the music sold in America as of last August, and that number is definitely going up, not down.

According to the IFPI, physical sales of music dropped 15.4% globally between 2007 and 2008. But in that same year, digital sales rose 24.1%. And Nielsen SoundScan numbers show that the number of units sold between 2006 and 2009 rose from 1 billion per year to 1.7 billion per year, with a unit referring to either an album or a song sold. It’s a significant increase, but when someone buying three songs counts the same as someone buying three CDs, you can see why the labels are losing money despite the positive-sounding stat.

But for unsigned bands, companies such as TuneCore and CD Baby act as middlemen between them and digital storefronts like iTunes for very small amounts of money; getting your album up on major stores such as iTunes, Amazon and eMusic will set you back about $47 through TuneCore. And you retain all ownership of your music and keep all royalties, unlike working with a record label.

And TuneCore’s internal numbers show that online sales are growing even faster for independent acts than those already well established. TuneCore CEO Jeff Price told me that between 2007 and 2009, TuneCore artists have gone from earning $7-8 million a year to $31 million, with $60 million in earnings projected for 2010. That’s insane growth, to be sure, but it’s got a long way to go before it represents a sizable proportion of global music sales. To put things in perspective, the IFPI recorded $4.9 billion in sales for 2008.

Furthermore, these days it’s easier than ever for musicians to record music without an expensive studio. Software such as Reason, Pro Tools and Logic can be bought for $300 or less, and run on a mid-range laptop. Cheap mics and gear can be found all over eBay and Craigslist. Tie everything together with a $200 to $500 mic preamp analog-to-digital/digital-to-analog box, and you have a mini-studio in your bedroom.

And music blogs have turned the way artists are discovered on its head. It used to be that high-paid A&R executives would scour clubs to find underground bands to sign, acting as the filter between the millions of mediocre bands and the discriminating public. Today, obsessive music fans scour clubs and the web for free, discovering new acts and writing about them on blogs. Labels then discover bands from these blogs. The A&R system is no longer as relevant.

Marketing and promotion, another cornerstone service that labels provide, has also been transformed by the web. You no longer need radio play and ads in Rolling Stone to get your band noticed. When a band makes a music video, there’s less of a need for a major label with contacts at MTV to push it through official channels to get it noticed. These days, you can just throw it up on YouTube and get it noticed by some music—or gadget—blogs. The fact that it’s a simple click or two from video appreciation to buying actual music is worth more than any paper ad in any dying magazine.

As Voyno from the musicians-as-entrepreneurs blog New Rockstar Philosophy told me, it’s very possible for a band to use the internet to replace much of what a label provides:

There are artists on YouTube who use creative on-the-cheap strategies to garner millions of views that direct traffic to their main site, iTunes pages, Facebook page and bandcamp.com profile. They then build an e-mail/text subscription from their new fans, which allows them to offer new merchandise, tickets for shows and other related info directly to fans. The web traffic analytics from all their sites can help them plan successful tours, target Facebook ads, and make better decisions on how to move forward.

These changes have shaken the foundation of the industry, and the biggest labels have borne the brunt of the losses that these changes wrought.

Tough Times for Major Labels

EMI is bleeding money. Earlier this month, it reported a whopping $2.4 billion loss, which, when added to its prior debts, puts it $4.5 billion in debt to CitiGroup. It owes Citi $160 million this month, and it’s facing a restructuring plan that’ll require an additional investment from its parent company.

EMI is owned by Terra Firma Capital Partners, a British private equity firm that also owns waste management companies, gas stations, residential home builders and movie theaters. To them, the art EMI is releasing is about as important as the trash that Waste Recycling Group collects. If it doesn’t make them money, it isn’t worth keeping around, 80 years of history or not.

Billboard’s Senior Editorial Analyst Glenn Peoples told me that it’s not for lack of trying that EMI finds itself in this position. “Labels have cut as many costs as they possibly can, they’ve taken fewer risks, they’ve signed fewer artists and tried to make safer bets,” he says. “They’re doing what they can, but the revenue might not be there to support the way they do business. So it’s very possible that the recorded music division of EMI will be sold off and will go elsewhere. An acquisition by Warner Music Group is a possibility, and that would take it down to three majors in recorded music, and that’d be pretty drastic and a lot of concentration between three companies.”

An EMI Music spokesperson told me, “EMI Music is doing well. We’ve reported revenue growth, despite a declining market, and strong operating profit and margin improvement, both in the last financial year and in the current year.” But if they can’t convince Terra Firma that they have a way out of the quagmire they’re in, the possibility of the number of major labels to dropping to three is very real.

And if that happens, what of those remaining three? Universal Music Group is owned by French media conglomerate Vivendi, a company with stakes in the Universal and Canal movie studios and the video game publisher Activision Blizzard amongst other holdings. Sony Music Entertainment is obviously a division of Sony, and we all know Sony has had problems of its own lately. Warner Music Group is the only major without a parent company to answer to, as it spun off from Time Warner in 2004, and its revenue dropped about $3.5 billion last year.

The Upside of Signing on the Dotted Line

But all is not lost, and the death of the record label at a business is not a foregone conclusion. Labels from EMI down to the smallest indie labels are racing to change the way they do business. And they still have quite a bit to offer.

Ra Ra Riot is a band from Syracuse, NY who’s currently prepping their second album from indie label Barsuk Records. Barsuk is a true indie based out of Seattle, featuring bands such as Death Cab for Cutie, Mates of State, Nada Surf and They Might Be Giants in addition to Ra Ra Riot.

I talked to Josh Roth, Ra Ra Riot’s manager, about the reasons bands still have for signing with a label. One big positive that signing to a label provides a band, he told me, is giving them legitimacy. “I think right now with the internet, there are just so many bands out there that it’s easy to go unnoticed,” he told me. “There’s still is a certain charm to having a label saying ‘We like this band and we’re going to sign them and you should take a listen.’ With the amount of bands that are out there, it’s hard to filter what is actually good now.”

Furthermore, as outlets such as radio and MTV have become less relevant, new venues for being heard and getting paid have opened up. “Commercials are becoming much more relevant,” Ra Ra Riot guitarist Milo Bonacci told me.

“That’s how a lot of bands get paid or get their music out there. That’s how a lot of people hear a song for the first time. I feel like commercials are taking the place of commercial radio.” And to get on a commercial, it sure helps to be signed to a label with a nice licensing department.

Of course, there are different types of record labels. A major label, such as EMI, has a lot more money to throw around and can make more promises, but contracts with majors can end up with artists further in the hole due to these deep pockets. As Bonacci told me, “There’s more risk. There’s more fuel to propel you forward up front, but that’s no guarantee.” That same fuel could blow up in your face. We’ve seen how bands who don’t hit it big can end up “owing” their major label hundreds of thousands of dollars, after all.

Indie labels (true indie labels, not boutiques under the umbrella of a major) have less resources and therefore will give bands less to recoup. Indies also will often offer the artist a chance to interact with top brass, something that is almost never done at a major. Indies are presumably owned by passionate music fans rather than gigantic multinational holding companies, which is important when a band needs to know that a label is 100% behind them, according to RRR’s Bonacci.

And signing to an indie instantly connects you to that labels fans, Bonacci says. “Nobody really cares about Sony records or Universal. You don’t seek out stuff that’s being released on Universal as a fan. Independent labels, be it Domino or SubPop or whatever, those labels have fans.”

Indie labels seem to have a better chance of adapting and surviving in tumultuous times. Since for the most part they’re private companies with few employees, they’re able to make drastic changes in their business models much more quickly than major labels. But that doesn’t mean they’ll all survive; famed indie label Touch and Go closed down last year, and in addition to repping bands such as TV on the Radio, Ted Leo and the Pharmacists, !!! and Blonde Redhead, they also handled distribution for other venerable indies such as Drag City, Kill Rock Stars, Jade Tree and Merge. It was a huge blow to the indie label scene.

Getting a Cut of Everything

The way labels are moving to stay alive is by becoming involved in the places that bands still make money, such as touring and merchandising. Traditionally, labels only made money off records sold, while any profits made from t-shirts or posters sold on the road went to the band. After all, if the label just owns the master recordings, it can only make money off the sale of said recordings, not any ancillary profits that come from things like touring.

But now some labels are pushing what are called 360 deals, which involve them in virtually everything an artist does. One of the most famous 360 deals was EMI’s 2002 deal with Robbie Williams, which was worth a whopping £80 million, giving EMI a piece of basically everything that Williams touched. That didn’t go so well, with Williams threatening to withhold albums from the label and trying to get out of his contract. But last week, according to UK trade paper Music Week, Williams’ manager Tim Clark publicly came out in support of the embattled label, saying, “My own view is Citigroup would be mad at this stage not to keep EMI on as a going concern. It just would be bonkers.”

In any case, 360 deals and general diversification are what big labels such as EMI are looking to move into, according to Billboard’s Glenn Peoples. “They’re definitely diversifying and they’re actually getting into agencies, artist management, concert promotion. There’s really no area that the four majors are not pursuing right now.”

These deals make the most sense for huge acts with lots of opportunities for branding and licensing. You’ve seen it in action here on Giz, in fact, with Dr. Dre’s Beats headphones and Lady Gaga’s new Creative Director “job” at Polaroid. Both those acts are signed to Interscope, a sub-label of Universal that’s clearly pushing artists towards these new revenue streams. But many smaller acts are still reluctant to give a label a slice of the entire pie with such a wide-reaching deal.

The fact of the matter is that bands do still need someone working for them, 360 deal or not. For some bands, just having a small team of a dedicated manager, publicist and lawyer who can handle the nitty-gritty of online sales, tour organization, merchandising and marketing will be enough for them. But many can still benefit from the huge networks that labels have with their contacts in every facet of the industry. Sure, you can print your own t-shirts, but a label with contacts with clothing manufacturers, stores and distributors can make that process a lot easier. And just how much of this work do you want to do yourself?

360 deals don’t make sense for all bands; Ra Ra Riot manager Roth isn’t sold on them. “A lot of labels are also now branching into management because the manager is involved with everything going on with a band. Labels will try to be like a full-service company to a band, but I don’t think it’ll be very popular.” He worries that bands will be setting themselves up to be taken advantage of even more by labels if they give up merchandising and touring profits to them. Having an independent team working for a band and playing middleman between them in the label makes sure there’s someone deeply involved in “business stuff” that still has their best interests at heart.

And it makes sense that a manager would be wary of labels moving into their territory, but there’s still a distinction between label and manager with these deals. “For example, a new artist signed to a multi-rights deal may use the major label’s merchandise company and e-commerce division in addition to its publishing and recorded music companies,” Peoples says. “In the past, a manager could pick and choose which merch, e-commerce, publishing and record companies it wanted to work with. Now they’re more likely to be under the same umbrella.”

Sometimes, a band’s management team can replace what a label does entirely. Just yesterday, OK Go announced it was splitting with EMI, whom they didn’t have the greatest relationship with, to strike out on their own with a new company called Paracadute. Paracadute is basically OK Go’s own team to handle management, promotion and distribution of their records. “The things that a major has to offer above and beyond anybody else are the things that OK Go really didn’t need so much,” Peoples says. “And that’s radio promotion and access to brick and mortar retail. If you’re going to create nearly all of your consumer awareness through cheaply made YouTube videos, you don’t need this big promotional and distribution system behind you.”

But not all bands can do what OK Go has done. The digital world looks a lot more accessible when only viewed through the lens of rock acts. “If you’re an R&B act, if you’re a straight up pop act, a country act, you’re going to need radio and you’re going to need brick and mortar retail, and that’s not going to change anytime soon. Things are changing definitely for alternative rock, rock and indie, but some genres sell a lot better in digital than other genres.”

But clearly, the money that’s to be made in music is no longer just in album sales. And bands seem to be presented with a choice: they can either allow labels to become more involved in everything that they do, and give up money that used to go exclusively to them in the process, or strike out on their own. Either way, they’ll entering a landscape where getting their song on Gossip Girl for 40 seconds is more important than any amount of FM radio play, where getting a music video posted to Stereogum is more important than getting it on MTV and where you make more money touring behind an album than selling that same album.

And in order to prove to artists that signing with a label is a better idea than going out on your own, they’ll need to make big changes; bigger than they’ve made so far. “It might be how an addict ends up turning his life around,” Peoples says. “He’s gotta hit rock bottom. And I dunno if the record industry has hit rock bottom yet, but maybe that’s what’ll need to happen for there to be really big change.”

But at the end of the day, the saving grace of record labels might be a lot more basic than who gets what percentage of merchandise or who deals with distribution. The big question is this: do bands really want to try to make it completely on their own? As Bonacci says, “I don’t necessarily want to have all that nitty-gritty stuff to worry about. I’d rather just worry about making music. I don’t want to worry about numbers or distribution or marketing or publicity or anything like that. That sounds like a desk job. I used to have a desk job, that’s why I’m playing music. Now look at me. I sleep on couches.”

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Friday, March 12th, 2010 news No Comments

The 22 Immutable Laws No Longer Apply

By Augustine Fou, ClickZ, Feb 4, 2010

The habits of modern consumers and their expectations have so drastically changed the landscape into which marketing and advertising campaigns are launched that what held true in the “golden age of advertising” no longer holds true at this, the dawn of the “golden age of the individual.”

In the classic “The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing,” Al Ries and Jack Trout expound on laws that are rooted in the ability to use storytelling to weave spellbinding brands and evoke emotion-filled loyalty. However, as the balance of power shifted away from advertisers to the people they used to target, the game has changed.

Increasingly, individuals prefer to do their own research rather than just take advertisers’ word for it. Individuals need greater levels of detailed information than can be conveyed in a :30 spot, a one page ad, or a radio spot. More individuals are empowered with information that is likely to have been created by other individuals (e.g., product reviews, blog posts) instead of advertisers.

Read on  22 Immutable Laws no Longer Apply

andressilvaaVERY INTERESTING [ARTICLE]: Click-Z takes on a marketing sacred text: http://bit.ly/ap1Gk7 (via @marcblumer)

ntortorellaThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://is.gd/7Pp1Y

mectoronto2nd part in a series dissecting and debunking the book ’22 Immutable Laws of Marketing’- http://bit.ly/cKm1eL 1st part-http://bit.ly/cmhpwh

rdlynchRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

marcblumerClick-Z takes on a marketing sacred text: http://bit.ly/ap1Gk7

rgrosskettThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

detroitredesignThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply (disappointing, since I really liked the book…)http://www.clickz.com/3636379

nobumbling#Marketing as we knew it, no more, read this article: The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://j.mp/b6NzHv (via @mnm8312)

tkahlowRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

acfouLike I said, it is better to be better than it is to be first (Immutable Law #1 is False) – http://bit.ly/9VkFge

vismediaRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd Pretty interesting view of Brands & Marketing.

sofebellReading: “The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ”( http://twitthis.com/sqygsh )

LaraMSi hope b-schools are listening! http://ow.ly/14QX8

BrennaEliseReading: The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://bit.ly/azMzyH

R_OtterstromRT @oliversudotcom: The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – what do you think about this article?http://ow.ly/15xj1

oliversudotcomThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – what do you think about this article? http://ow.ly/15xj1

acfouImmutable Law 5: Own a word in the prospect’s mind – what’s Apple? great design, ease-of-use, music, or computers? –http://bit.ly/aRfkiY

coopermediaonly“The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply” – http://ow.ly/15hQj

connectwithcoop“The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply” – http://ow.ly/15hQa

jeetblogThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – http://www.clickz.com/3636379

dougdavidoff@toddsattersten I had the same feeling about it (http://tinyurl.com/yjye2fl )

dougdavidoff@toddsattersten did you read this: http://tinyurl.com/yjye2fl? Interesting take on applicability of Immutable Laws.

KKilnerRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

bottreeRT @tweetmeme The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

inggitaRT @durjoy: My pal Augustine Fou @ClickZ skewers the 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing: http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

acfouWhich too-clever-for-anyone, too-over-the-top-sleazy, or too-brand-perfumey-that-it-makes-me-gag ads did u see ystrday?http://bit.ly/aRfkiY

ntortorellaThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://bit.ly/9DZhYs

sluuAn interesting blog about how The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://bit.ly/bb8MOd – (via @clickz)

TechValidateVery interesting read. Classic marketing dogma is not true anymore. The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply.http://ow.ly/14QX8

durjoyMy pal Augustine Fou @ClickZ skewers the 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing: http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

TobyDivaaugustine fou looks at marketing thru a social lens & updates ries & trout’s 22 rules http://ow.ly/153oo

IdeafoodARTICLE: The 22 immutable laws of marketing no longer apply. http://bit.ly/kent914 (via @KentHuffman)

AIM2meRT @clickz Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://bit.ly/bb8MOd but don’t forget the basics http://bit.ly/bmIIDF

acfouImmutable Law 3: advertisers often misinterpret that they can buy their way into the prospects’ minds by shouting loud http://bit.ly/aRfkiY

andressilvaa@warpx These Marketing Laws are very good and excellent tips: http://bit.ly/kent914 (via @KentHuffman)

davidhughanThe 22 immutable laws of #marketing no longer apply by @ClickZ http://bit.ly/c56rVy

jack2ussrDo you really believe? 😉 @ramonthomas The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://www.clickz.com/3636379

subbuu22 Immutable Laws of Marketing no longer applies http://j.mp/92GpRz Controversy brewing…

jannekorpiGreat article – How the laws of marketing have changed http://bit.ly/azMzyH

azalec22 Immutable Laws of Marketing no longer apply; balance of power has shifted from advertisers to those being targeted.http://bit.ly/91w7Yk

tfanelliInteresting read – The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ: http://www.clickz.com/3636379

MarySicardBlasphemy! “The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply,” says Augustine Fou. http://twurl.nl/dnvzqq

hainguyenVThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – Augustine Fou. Interesting post http://bit.ly/azMzyH

astridguillonRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

LaunchiteThe immutable laws of marketing, re-examined in the digital/social media age http://bit.ly/bTDPK8

LaraMSi hope b-schools are listening! http://ow.ly/14QX8

BrennaEliseReading: The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://bit.ly/azMzyH

R_OtterstromRT @oliversudotcom: The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – what do you think about this article? http://ow.ly/15xj1

oliversudotcomThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – what do you think about this article? http://ow.ly/15xj1

acfouImmutable Law 5: Own a word in the prospect’s mind – what’s Apple? great design, ease-of-use, music, or computers? – http://bit.ly/aRfkiY

coopermediaonly“The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply” – http://ow.ly/15hQj

connectwithcoop“The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply” – http://ow.ly/15hQa

jeetblogThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – http://www.clickz.com/3636379

dougdavidoff@toddsattersten I had the same feeling about it (http://tinyurl.com/yjye2fl )

dougdavidoff@toddsattersten did you read this: http://tinyurl.com/yjye2fl? Interesting take on applicability of Immutable Laws.

KKilnerRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

bottreeRT @tweetmeme The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

inggitaRT @durjoy: My pal Augustine Fou @ClickZ skewers the 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing: http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

acfouWhich too-clever-for-anyone, too-over-the-top-sleazy, or too-brand-perfumey-that-it-makes-me-gag ads did u see ystrday? http://bit.ly/aRfkiY

ntortorellaThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://bit.ly/9DZhYs

sluuAn interesting blog about how The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://bit.ly/bb8MOd – (via @clickz)

TechValidateVery interesting read. Classic marketing dogma is not true anymore. The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply. http://ow.ly/14QX8

durjoyMy pal Augustine Fou @ClickZ skewers the 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing: http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

TobyDivaaugustine fou looks at marketing thru a social lens & updates ries & trout’s 22 rules http://ow.ly/153oo

IdeafoodARTICLE: The 22 immutable laws of marketing no longer apply. http://bit.ly/kent914 (via @KentHuffman)

AIM2meRT @clickz Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://bit.ly/bb8MOd but don’t forget the basics http://bit.ly/bmIIDF

acfouImmutable Law 3: advertisers often misinterpret that they can buy their way into the prospects’ minds by shouting loud http://bit.ly/aRfkiY

andressilvaa@warpx These Marketing Laws are very good and excellent tips: http://bit.ly/kent914 (via @KentHuffman)

davidhughanThe 22 immutable laws of #marketing no longer apply by @ClickZ http://bit.ly/c56rVy

jack2ussrDo you really believe? 😉 @ramonthomas The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://www.clickz.com/3636379

subbuu22 Immutable Laws of Marketing no longer applies http://j.mp/92GpRz Controversy brewing…

jannekorpiGreat article – How the laws of marketing have changed http://bit.ly/azMzyH

azalec22 Immutable Laws of Marketing no longer apply; balance of power has shifted from advertisers to those being targeted. http://bit.ly/91w7Yk

tfanelliInteresting read – The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ: http://www.clickz.com/3636379

MarySicardBlasphemy! “The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply,” says Augustine Fou. http://twurl.nl/dnvzqq

hainguyenVThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – Augustine Fou. Interesting post http://bit.ly/azMzyH

astridguillonRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

LaunchiteThe immutable laws of marketing, re-examined in the digital/social media age http://bit.ly/bTDPK8

DCCommercialREThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd http://fb.me/5k34bZe

HAustinERT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

oliversudotcomRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

lohhw3RT @brandconsultant: Brilliant article on the death of #positioning http://bit.ly/azMzyH #advertising #malaysia #singapore #indonesia

thebfceWithTwitter, stupidity spreads even faster…The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

brandconsultantBrilliant article on the death of #positioning http://bit.ly/azMzyH #advertising #malaysia #singapore #indonesia

andressilvaa@warpx They are very good Marketing Laws: http://bit.ly/kent914 (via @KentHuffman)

Vanessa_BrightThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://ow.ly/14G6g

steve_suttonRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

SweetLoveGiftsA must read! RT @clickz via @jimcaruso: The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

Vanessa_BrightRT @KentHuffman: The 22 immutable laws of marketing no longer apply: http://bit.ly/kent914

samanthastoneRT @DebbieMarchok. RT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

michaelredwoodRT @DebbieMarchok: RT @marketing_chief Shaking it up. RT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

DebbieMarchokRT @marketing_chief Shaking it up. RT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

jimcarusoRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

vivosityRT @GuyKawasaki: How immutable are the immutable laws of marketing? http://ow.ly/1o9Y82

MarketingRagRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply. Augustine Fou takes them apart on ClickZ. http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

faragodgRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

veneredimiloRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

rCrosbySticklesThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://www.clickz.com/3636379

brandconsultantFinally someone else who believes positioning & other mass economy models no longer apply http://bit.ly/azMzyH #marketing #positioning

RellyMeltzerThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://www.clickz.com/3636379

acfouNo one knows you, the small fish in a big pond? Make a new pond? The mktng problem then becomes no one knows your pond: http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

italianpassionRT @andressilvaa: ARTICLE: The 22 immutable laws of marketing no longer apply. http://bit.ly/kent914 (via @KentHuffman)

apkalnsEven “The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing” evolve & transform: http://www.clickz.com/3636379 #marketing #change

andressilvaaARTICLE: The 22 immutable laws of marketing no longer apply. http://bit.ly/kent914 (via @KentHuffman)

ChrisCopywriterhttp://www.clickz.com/3636379 http://fb.me/58F8vCW

UKSEOSpecialistThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://bit.ly/azMzyH

vvpreethamThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://ow.ly/14wJp

saintmoonriverRT @ramonthomas: Al Ries and Jack Trout’s The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://www.clickz.com/3636379

ramonthomasAl Ries and Jack Trout’s The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://www.clickz.com/3636379

markvanbaale“Traditional “push” advertising is like a thief breaking into your home at dinnertime and shouting at your family” – http://bit.ly/azMzyH

nickwredenWhy “positioning” theory &”22 immutable laws” are no longer true & will hurt your brand. Great Clickz article. http://bit.ly/azMzyH

AbsatzlehreBy @-davidhughan Great read: The 22 immutable laws of #-marketing no longer apply by @ClickZ http://bit.ly/c56rVy

davidhughanGreat read: The 22 immutable laws of #marketing no longer apply by @ClickZ http://bit.ly/c56rVy

jennycoupeThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ: http://www.clickz.com/3636379 via @addthis

TimCohnThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/aOMY3Q

jpoloObserving: “The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ”, http://bit.ly/baH32k

MichaelMyersThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing that No Longer Apply: http://bit.ly/azMzyH

CarrieK_IEGRT @KMGDePaul: Why the 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://ow.ly/1o9Y82

KMGDePaulWhy the 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://ow.ly/1o9Y82

KenRobbinsRT @kraigguffey: RT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

CavalierPaleRT @elneco The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

elnecootra visión a las clásicas “22 leyes inmutables del mkt” http://www.clickz.com/3636379

webexecutivesMARKETING: @acfou‘s take on how and why the first 7 of “The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing” have changed (http://j.mp/aFxKrP ).

RogersParkCoCRT @whatworks: How the Laws of Marketing Have Changed http://ow.ly/14mSC (via ClickZ)

normbondThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/a8bbGa

fishermarketingExcellent! RT @whatworks How the Laws of Marketing Have Changed http://ow.ly/14mSC (via ClickZ)

AnibalDoRosarioGolden Age of Ads Laws no longer valid in Golden Age Of The Individual “The 22 Laws of Marketing” no longer applicable: http://bit.ly/bGert9

whatworksHow the Laws of Marketing Have Changed http://ow.ly/14mSC (via ClickZ)

vickysjonesThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://bit.ly/acONli

bmelchiorThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://bit.ly/acONli

MCNAffiliatesRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

manfredkisslingThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ: http://www.clickz.com/3636379 via @addthis

hbgcoachingRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

steprincipatoRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd #marketing

gburkeThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply (Part 1, Rules 1-7) http://bit.ly/90f8Us

gregg_makuchChallenge conventional wisdom – The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – http://bit.ly/azMzyH

shaziaparwezRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

ForwardProIt’s always time to rethink marketing: http://bit.ly/acONli

pamdyer“The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing” revisited http://bit.ly/btL7VC Column: They no longer apply in new landscape

jasoncerconeThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply http://bit.ly/azMzyH

nickromRT @tweetmeme The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

dancommatorThe 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply #marketing #marketingstrategy http://bit.ly/azMzyH

CGFSyncresisRT @clickz The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply – ClickZ http://bit.ly/bb8MOd

Dan_AgnewPeople still arguing “The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing,” but it’s still great food for thought: http://bit.ly/acONli

acfouFALSE: 1st Immutable Law – It is better to be first than it is to be better; today it is better to be better – http://bit.ly/aRfkiY

DaintyNinjaHow the laws that governed the “golden age of advertising” are no longer valid in this “golden age of the individual.” http://bit.ly/acONli

craiglandesNice work: The 22 Immutable Laws No Longer Apply in the “golden age of the consumer” @acfouhttp://bit.ly/aRfkiY

FiurInformationTraditional marketers making the shift take note! The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply (http://bit.ly/acONli ) #in

acfouThe 22 Immutable Laws No Longer Apply in the “golden age of the consumer” @acfouhttp://bit.ly/aRfkiY

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Tuesday, February 9th, 2010 digital No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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