decisions

In-Store Marketing Tactics Still Sway Some Grocery Decisions

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/print/in-store-marketing-tactics-still-sway-some-grocery-decisions-35704/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

IRI-Store-Marketing-Tactics-Influence-Brand-Decisions-Aug2013More than half of consumers decide on which products they’ll buy at the grocery store before they leave their homes, according to new data released by Information Resources Inc. (IRI). However, the survey results indicate that in-store marketing tactics still sway some. 48% of respondents indicate that shopper loyalty card discounts influence their final brand decisions, while 44% say the same about in-store circulars.

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Friday, August 9th, 2013 news No Comments

The Major Retailers Most Threatened By Mobile Showrooming

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-major-retailers-threatened-by-mobile-2013-6

The practice of “showrooming,” or viewing an item in a retail store and then buying it online, has brought the e-commerce threat directly to bricks-and-mortar retailers.

Mobile raises the showrooming threat to a new level since price comparisons are available to shoppers immediately, as they make decisions and browse e-commerce websites in stores.

In a recent report from BI Intelligence, we analyze mobile showrooming’s influence on retail, and examine the various different types of consumer behavior that make up showrooming.

We also look at what the big retailers are doing to combat showrooming, and identify the five broad strategies that will help brick-and-mortar retailers win business from showroomers.

Access The Full Report By Signing Up For A Free Trial Today >>

Take a look at this chart from our report:

bii_showrooming_risk<br! >

Estimates of how much retail volume is influenced by smartphones vary wildly, but here are some numbers that gauge mobile showrooming’s influence:

In one dramatic effort to combat showrooming, U.S. electronics retailer Best Buy announced last month that starting March 3, 2013, its stores would match the prices of 19 major online competitors, including Apple, Amazon, and Buy.com. Target also has a price-matching policy in effect.

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Monday, June 24th, 2013 digital No Comments

In-Store Product Research Influences Most Smartphone Owners

Source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/interactive/in-store-product-research-influences-most-smartphone-owners-decisions-23300/

14% of American smartphone owners who have scanned or texted for product information while in-store say they made an unplanned purchase as a result, according to [download page] a September 2012 report from Vibes. Yet, an almost equal proportion (15%) report being dissuaded from making a purchase. Still, a plurality say that the product information […]

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Wednesday, September 12th, 2012 news No Comments

NBC Spoiled Missy Franklin’s Tape-Delayed Gold Medal Race Just Moments Before Airing The Race

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/video-nbc-spoiled-missy-franklins-tape-delayed-gold-medal-2012-7

NBC has received plenty of heat and criticism for their decisions to tape-delay a number of the more popular Olympic events. But they aren’t helping their own case when they spoil their own coverage with a promo for another show.

That’s what happened tonight when NBC was getting set to show the women’s 100 meter backstroke, an event Franklin won (will win?). The network went to commercial with a view of Franklin in the pool and the teaser “coming up, how good can Missy Franklin be tonight? The finals of the 100-back coming up.”

And from the “can’t make it up department,” NBC then showed a promo for “The Today Show” centered around Franklin celebrating her gold medal with her parents. The promo even included a shot of Franklin on the medal stand with her medal.

Gee, I wonder if she is going to win?!? Here’s the video…

 

Please follow Sports Page on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

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Monday, July 30th, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5885321/how-iphone-apps-steal-your-contact-data-and-why-you-cant-stop-it

How iPhone Apps Steal Your Contact Data and Why You Can't Stop ItThe internet is starting to realize something unsettling: our iPhones send information about the people we know to private servers, often without our permission. Some offending apps are fixing themselves. Some aren’t. But the underlying problem is much bigger.

Apple allows any app to access your address book at any time—it’s built into the iPhone’s core software. The idea is to make using these apps more seamless and magical, in that you won’t have dialog boxes popping up in your face all the time, the way Apple zealously guards your location permissions at an OS level—because fewer clicks mean a more graceful experience, right? Maybe, but the consequence is privacy shivved and consent nullified. Your phone makes decisions about what’s okay to share with a company, whose motivation is, ultimately, making money, without consulting you first.

Once you peel back that pretty skin of your phone and observe the software at work—we used a proxy application called Charles—watching the data that jumps between your phone and a remote server is plain. A little too plain. What can we see?

As Paul Haddad, the developer behind the popular Twitter client TapBot pointed out to me, some of App Store’s shiniest celebrities are among those that beam away your contact list in order to make hooking up with other friends who use the app smoother. From Haddad’s own findings:

Foursquare (Email, Phone Numbers no warning)
Path (Pretty much everything after warning)
Instagram (Email, Phone Numbers, First, Last warning)
Facebook (Email, Phone Numbers, First, Last warning)
Twitter for iOS (Email, Phone Numbers, warning)
Voxer (Email, First, Last, Phone numbers, warning)

Foursquare and Instagram have both recently updated to provide a much clearer warning of what you’re about to share. Which every single app should follow, providing clear warnings before they touch your contacts. But plenty of apps aren’t so generous. “A lot of other popular social networking apps send some data,” says Haddad, “mostly names, emails, phone numbers.” Instapaper, for example, transmits your address book’s email listings when you ask it to “search contacts” to connect with other friends using the app. The app never makes it clear that my data (shown up top) is leaving the phone—and once it’s out of your hands and in Instagram’s, all you can do is trust that it’ll be handled responsibly. You know, like not be stored permanently without your knowledge.

Trust is all we’ve got, and that’s not good. “Once the data is out of your device there’s no way to tell what happens to it,” explains Haddad. Companies might do the decent thing and delete your data immediately. Like Foursquare, which says it doesn’t store your data at all after matching your friends, and never has. Twitter keeps your address book data for 18 months “to make it easy for you and your contacts to discover each other on Twitter after you’ve signed up,” but can delete the data at any time with a link at the bottom of this page. Or a company might do the Path thing, storing that information indefinitely until they’re publicly shamed into doing otherwise. Or worse.

We need a solution, and goodwill on the part of app devs is going to cut it. All the ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT TO DO THIS? dialog boxes in the world won’t absolve Apple’s decision to hand out our address books on a pearly platter. iOS is the biggest threat to iOS—and nothing short of a major revision to the way Apple allows apps to run through your contacts should be acceptable. But is that even enough? Maybe not.

Jay Freeman, developer behind the massively popular jailbroken-iPhone program Cydia, doesn’t think Apple’s hand is enough to definitively state who gets your address book, and when:

“Neither Apple nor the application developer is in a good position to decide that ahead of time, and due to this neither Apple’s model of ‘any app can access the address book, no app can access your recent calls’, nor Google’s method of ‘developer claims they need X, take it or leave it’ is sufficient.”

Freeman’s solution? Cydia’s “one-off modifications to the underlying operating system” that we deal in, nicely transfers this control back to the user.” In other words, we can’t trust Apple or the people that make apps—so let’s just trust ourselves to control how iOS works.

Freeman left us with one, final, disquieting note. Shrewd devs and others with the knowhow have been able to dig through app traffic to find out of they’re shoveling around your address book. But there’s no easy way to do this—and if a dev really wants to sneak your data through the door, there’s technically nothing we can do to stop him: “There are tons of complex tricks that can be used to smuggle both information in network traffic and computation itself.” It’s a problem fundamental to computer science—once the data’s in a dev’s hands, he can conjure it away, too small to be noticed by App Store oversight in churning sea of other apps.

Unless Apple keeps him from getting that information in the first place by letting us all make informed decisions with our phone and the private life poured into it. Your move, iOS.

Photo: Motorolka/Shutterstock

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Wednesday, February 15th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

A new definition of “digital” – the collection of habits and expectations of modern users

By defining “digital” as not the technology, device, or channel, but rather the habits and expectations of modern users, we are able to make practical decisions about which marketing tactics, technologies, devices, and channels to use to match these users’ habits and expectations.  If you know their habit is to search, then you wouldn’t blow your whole budget on TV ads and have nothing for them to find online when they search. if you believe they expect to be able to find information from their iPhones, then you wouldn’t make your whole site high bandwidth, flashy, and Flash because they wont be able to view it at all.

Thank you all for your comments and retweets.

HamiltonWallaceA New Definition of Digital: http://bit.ly/2deV5u Article nails how “digital” is changing behavior. Listen-up marketers!

glenngabeA New Definition of ‘Digital’ http://bit.ly/2deV5u via @acfou on ClickZ

belindaangRT @randymatheson: Do we need a new definition of ‘Digital’? | ClickZ http://ow.ly/qZ4N

randymathesonDo we need a new definition of ‘Digital’? | ClickZ http://ow.ly/qZ4N

jonnylongdenRT @arkley68: Good post by @acfou – A New Definition of ‘Digital’ – http://www.clickz.com/3635052 #measure #roi

BennaPReading: the new definition of ‘digital’ from @acfou -via Clickz – excellent and informative read http://www.clickz.com/3635052

bwhigamInteresting POV – A New Definition of ‘Digital’ – http://bit.ly/2deV5u

MJinNYCRT @acfou – Branding is dead; targeting is dying; social media is not media- A new definition of digital? – http://bit.ly/TTTPC

acfouBranding is dead; targeting is dying; social media is not media – if you believe this new definition of “digital” – http://bit.ly/TTTPC

SgtWiggidyA new definition of Digital – http://bit.ly/2deV5u – Good Read!

jacqueswarrenNot so hot about his definition of digital, but this is certainly an action packed article !! http://bit.ly/2deV5u

Adtraction_RAJ_The new definition of digital – not just websites anymore. http://bit.ly/pAfEP

arkley68Good post by @acfou – A New Definition of ‘Digital’ – http://www.clickz.com/3635052 #measure #roi

MPPR755DCSRT @kathymbaird Defining ‘digital’ http://tinyurl.com/yb5f9tq I work with a ‘digital’ team I teach a ‘digital’ course. This about sums it up

jeanaandersonI just had this conversation at an interview Tues: Is Digital killing the brand? Is creative losing its pull? http://www.clickz.com/3635052

RaynaNyc‘A New Definition of Digital’ http://bit.ly/Xn2Gr Thought provoking post by @acfou (via clickz)

HeidiPatmoreRT @Jussipekka Reading A New Definition of ‘Digital’ (via @DaGood) http://www.clickz.com/3635052

kathymbairdDefining “digital” http://tinyurl.com/yb5f9tq. I work with a “digital” team. I teach a “digital” course. This about sums it up.

mktmobileA New Definition of ‘#Digital’: is not about products, it’s all about habits and expectations http://bit.ly/iTH67

fsdigitalA New Definition of ‘Digital’? : http://bit.ly/moxhd

konsultantasRT @baltix A New Definition of ‘Digital’ http://htxt.it/ZnVv

JussipekkaReading A New Definition of ‘Digital’ (via @DaGood) http://www.clickz.com/3635052

baltixA New Definition of ‘Digital’ http://htxt.it/ZnVv

sunshooter81A New Definition of ‘Digital’: Many people actively search for things online. And the moment they type i.. http://bit.ly/19irO8

DeanLandRecommended reading. Good piece from AC Fou: RT @acfou: How do you define “digital”? I define it thusly … http://bit.ly/TTTPC

acfouHow do you define “digital”? I define it thusly … http://bit.ly/TTTPC

LevickHow the new definition of “digital” is shaping marketing trends (from @acfou) http://bit.ly/Xn2Gr

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Thursday, September 24th, 2009 digital No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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