drive

Automation, Integration of Inbound Marketing Still Limited

source: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/Automation-Integration-of-Inbound-Marketing-Still-Limited/1010305

Inbound marketing primarily used to drive leads

Inbound marketing tactics, including content marketing, search engine optimization and use of social media marketing, are all critical for businesses looking to generate leads. But these tasks are also difficult to pull off, particularly the creation and marketing of content.

That was seen as both the most effective and most difficult inbound marketing tactic in a survey of B2B and B2C marketing professionals worldwide, conducted in September 2013 by Ascend2 and Research Underwriters.

Marketing automation is one technique to make inbound marketing tactics more strategic and complementary, as well as reduce much of the guesswork of inbound marketing, but the survey found that at this point, few were actually employing marketing automation. Just 16% of B2Cs and 14% of B2Bs reported using marketing automation extensively to manage their inbound marketing. That said, over 40% from both types of companies were employing marketing automation to a limited extent, indicating that use could grow in the near future.

Taking a look at those who ranked their inbound marketing tactics as very successful vs. those who saw them as unsuccessful, 45% of successful inbound marketers used marketing automation, vs. only 9% of unsuccessful inbound marketers.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Thursday, October 17th, 2013 news No Comments

How Much Physical Space Does the Internet Take Up?

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5965798/how-much-physical-space-does-the-internet-take-up

How Much Physical Space Does the Internet Take Up?The internet is one of the most ethereal concepts in tech: it’s nowhere and everywhere, all at once. But if you could measure the thing, how much physical space would it take up?

Fortunately Randall Munroe of XKCD fame has answered the question in a fun way over on his What If? site. He explains:

There are a lot of ways to estimate the amount of information stored on the internet, but we can put an interesting upper bound on the number just by looking at how much storage space we (as a species) have purchased.

The storage industry produces in the neighborhood of 650 million hard drives per year. If most of them are 3.5″ drives, then that’s eight liters (two gallons) of hard drive per second.

This means the last few years of hard drive production-which, thanks to increasing size, represent a large chunk of global storage capacity-would just about fill an oil tanker. So, by that measure, the internet is smaller than an oil tanker.

In fact, this answer is just a snippet from a series of short “What if?” questions answered in a single post on his site. Go read the rest. [What If?]

Image by nrkbeta under Creative Commons license

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012 news No Comments

Chrome OS on the cheap, but at what cost?

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/11/26/acer-c7-chromebook-review/

Acer C7 Chromebook review: Chrome OS on the cheap, but at what cost?

It’s been just over a month since Google unveiled its gorgeous and affordable $249 Samsung Chromebook only to surprise us days later with an even cheaper system, the $199 Acer C7 Chromebook. At first glance, these two laptops are very similar, both in purpose (cloud-based computing on a budget) and in specs (11.6-inch display, dual-core CPU, 2GB of RAM), but there are significant differences under the hood. Samsung’s offering achieves its svelte form factor, 6.5-hour battery life and attractive price via a fully integrated and fanless ARM-based design while Acer takes a more conservative approach — cramming standard off-the-shelf components like a 2.5-inch hard drive, small-outline memory module, mini-PCIe WiFi card, and Intel Celeron processor into a traditional netbook-like chassis. Does being $50 cheaper make up for the C7’s lack of sex appeal and short 4-hour battery life? What other compromises in performance and build quality (if any) were made to achieve this lower cost? Most importantly, which budget Chromebook is right for you? Find out after the break.

Gallery: Acer C7 Chromebook review

Continue reading Acer C7 Chromebook review: Chrome OS on the cheap, but at what cost?

Filed under: , ,

Comments

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Monday, November 26th, 2012 news No Comments

7 Short-Term Car Rental Agencies Everyone Should Bookmark

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/save-cash-with-short-term-car-rentals-2012-11

ZipCar

Owning a car costs an average of $8,776 annually, according to the American Automobile Association. That is based on 15,000 miles of driving and includes fuel, insurance, maintenance and depreciation.

Car rental companies will rent wheels by the month for as little as $589, according to Orbitz, which amounts to $7,068 per year — not including fuel, which is a major cost.

If you want to skip the bus, but still save on transportation costs, you could consider using a short-term vehicle rental service.

These vehicles are rented by the hour (or sometimes by the minute) and the rental company picks up all the usual costs of car ownership.

Short-term vehicle rental is an emerging trend that is currently only available in select big cities, but it is expanding. Here are the major operators:

Car2Go

This subsidiary of Mercedes-Benz parent Daimler, rents tiny Smartcars for 38 cents per minute or $13.99 per hour. You also pay a one-time $35 membership fee.

Renters can book one of the two-seaters online, or use a membership card to open and drive off in any of the blue-and-white painted cars they find parked around town.

Car2go pays for gas and when renters are done using the car, they simply park in any designated space, usually located downtown or in heavily trafficked areas, and walk away.

Car2go currently operates in six North American cities and a dozen European cities.

Zipcar

This company operates like car2Go, except it rents more than 30 different types of vehicles.

Rates vary by location and plan, but in San Francisco, for instance, the occasional driver plan requires a $60 annual fee, $25 application fee and hourly rates of about $8.50.

Zipcar operates in 20 major U.S. cities as well as Canada, the United Kingdom, Spain and Austria.

DriveNow

This is a joint venture led by BMW that features the German automaker’s all-electric ActiveE sedan.

Renters pay a one-time membership fee of $39 and, after picking up the car at a DriveNow station, $12 for the first 30 minutes and 32 cents for additional minutes for a one-hour rate of $21.60.

DriveNow is available in four German cities and San Francisco.

Modo

Modo is a car-sharing co-op that requires a $20 initial registration, fee plus $50 per year and $7.50 per hour for rentals.

Renters pre-book vehicles in half-hour increments and pay penalties for late returns, cancellations and no-shows.

Modo rents a variety of vehicles, but only in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Hertz on Demand

This service is an hourly offering of the world’s largest car rental company. It requires no annual fees and charges hourly rates ranging from $5 in Boston to $8 in San Antonio.

Renters pick up and drop off vehicles, which include Nissan’s Sentra, as well as Chevy Cruze and Malibu models, at designated Hertz On Demand locations.

Hertz On Demand is in a dozen U.S. cities as well as the United Kingdom, France, Spain and Germany.

Scoot

This startup charges $10 to join and $5 per month, plus $5 per hour to rent two-wheeled electric scooters, complete with helmets.

The service is available only in San Francisco and environs, and the scooters are only suitable for single passengers traveling at less than highway speed.

Breaking Down the Cost

The average adult spends just under an hour driving daily, according to the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics.

Based on average short-term rates of about $12 hourly, the typical adult driver could spend $4,380 per year on short-term rentals, which is less than half ! the cost of owning a car, while still driving the same amount.

Hourly car renters sacrifice some convenience and still must pay for parking tickets, lost membership cards and other incidentals.

But, for people who live where short-term rentals are available, drive the average amount or less, and don’t need a car at their beck and call, short-term rentals appear to offer an inexpensive way to get around.

DON’T MISS: The 10 most dangerous states for drivers >

Please follow Your Money on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »



Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, November 13th, 2012 news No Comments

Dell Vostro line gets Ivy Bridge CPUs, optional 4G LTE

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/12/dell-vostro-line-ivy-bridge-cpus-optional-4g-lte/

Dell Vostro line gets Ivy Bridge CPUs, optional 4G LTE

Dell’s Vostro line of entry-level business notebooks is next up to receive the good ‘ol Ivy Bridge update. Today the company is announcing the Vostro 3360, 3460 and 3560 laptops, in 13-inch, 14-inch and 15-inch sizes, respectively. All models will be configurable with either second- (Core i3) or third-gen (Core i5 or Core i7) Intel CPUs along with several graphics options and up to 8GB of RAM. And let’s not forget those business features: fingerprint readers, file and folder encryption and security software are available on all three models. The Vostro 3360 and 3460 will also offer optional 4G LTE mobile broadband.

Getting more specific, the $649 Vostro 3360 measures 0.76 inches thick, weighs 3.67 pounds and comes standard with a 320GB hard drive spinning at 7,200RPM (a 750GB configuration and an optional 32GB SSD are also available). Starting at $599, the 4.92-pound Vostro 3460 comes with the same processor options and is available with NVIDIA GeForce GT 630M graphics and up to a 7,200RPM, 750GB hard drive coupled with a 32GB SSD. Unlike the 3360, the 14-incher comes with a backlit keyboard and includes an optical drive. Lastly, there’s the 15-inch, 5.75-pound Vostro 3560, which can be configured with AMD Radeon HD 7670M graphics and a 1920 x 1080 display (you get the same storage options as the 3460, along with the same backlit keyboard and optical drive). The Vostro 3560 is currently on sale for $599 on Dell’s website, while the 3360 and 3460 will be available on June 21st. Head past the break for more photos and the full press release.

Gallery: Dell Vostro 3360, 3460 and 3650 hands-on

Continue reading Dell Vostro line gets Ivy Bridge CPUs, optional 4G LTE

Dell Vostro line gets Ivy Bridge CPUs, optional 4G LTE originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 12 Jun 2012 09:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceDell  | Email this | Comments

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, June 12th, 2012 news No Comments

Dell Vostro line gets Ivy Bridge CPUs, optional 4G LTE

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/12/dell-vostro-line-ivy-bridge-cpus-optional-4g-lte/

Dell Vostro line gets Ivy Bridge CPUs, optional 4G LTE

Dell’s Vostro line of entry-level business notebooks is next up to receive the good ‘ol Ivy Bridge update. Today the company is announcing the Vostro 3360, 3460 and 3560 laptops, in 13-inch, 14-inch and 15-inch sizes, respectively. All models will be configurable with either second- (Core i3) or third-gen (Core i5 or Core i7) Intel CPUs along with several graphics options and up to 8GB of RAM. And let’s not forget those business features: fingerprint readers, file and folder encryption and security software are available on all three models. The Vostro 3360 and 3460 will also offer optional 4G LTE mobile broadband.

Getting more specific, the $649 Vostro 3360 measures 0.76 inches thick, weighs 3.67 pounds and comes standard with a 320GB hard drive spinning at 7,200RPM (a 750GB configuration and an optional 32GB SSD are also available). Starting at $599, the 4.92-pound Vostro 3460 comes with the same processor options and is available with NVIDIA GeForce GT 630M graphics and up to a 7,200RPM, 750GB hard drive coupled with a 32GB SSD. Unlike the 3360, the 14-incher comes with a backlit keyboard and includes an optical drive. Lastly, there’s the 15-inch, 5.75-pound Vostro 3560, which can be configured with AMD Radeon HD 7670M graphics and a 1920 x 1080 display (you get the same storage options as the 3460, along with the same backlit keyboard and optical drive). The Vostro 3560 is currently on sale for $599 on Dell’s website, while the 3360 and 3460 will be available on June 21st. Head past the break for more photos and the full press release.

Gallery: Dell Vostro 3360, 3460 and 3650 hands-on

Continue reading Dell Vostro line gets Ivy Bridge CPUs, optional 4G LTE

Dell Vostro line gets Ivy Bridge CPUs, optional 4G LTE originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 12 Jun 2012 09:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceDell  | Email this | Comments

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, June 12th, 2012 news No Comments

$30 billion net revenue, $1.5 billion net earnings, big drop in PC sales

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/02/22/hp-reports-q1-2012-earnings-30-billion-net-revenue-1-5-billi/

HP reported results for its first fiscal quarter of 2012 this afternoon, including $30 billion in net revenue (down seven percent from the previous year), and net earnings of $1.5 billion (down a full 44 percent). Partly contributing to that drop is a slump from its Personal Systems Group, which saw revenue slip 15 percent year-over-year, and total desktop and notebook units decline a rather drastic 19 and 18 percent, respectively. The company’s Imaging and Printing Group also saw a seven percent decline in revenue, with the total number of printer units slipping 15 percent. HP’s services business managed to eke out a one percent growth with revenue of $8.6 billion, though, while its software business saw the biggest growth in any one area at 30 percent (that includes results from the recently-acquired Autonomy). The company’s full rundown can be found in the press release after the break, with additional numbers available at the source link below.

Update: On the company’s earnings call, CEO Meg Whitman laid some of the blame for PSG’s decline on hard drive shortages, but also said that HP has “under-invested in innovation for the last several years” and “been late to market too often,” adding that “we have to lead again.” A transcript of Whitman’s prepared remarks can be found here.

Continue reading HP reports Q1 2012 financials: $30 billion net revenue, $1.5 billion net earnings, big drop in PC sales

ttp://ww w.engadget.com/2012/02/22/hp-reports-q1-2012-earnings-30-billion-net-revenue-1-5-billi/”>HP reports Q1 2012 financials: $30 billion net revenue, $1.5 billion net earnings, big drop in PC sales originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 22 Feb 2012 16:22:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceHP  | Email this | Comments

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5884415/travelling-in-modern-china-requires-serious-secret-agent-skills

Travelling in Modern Day China Requires Cold War Era Secret Agent SkillsIf Kenneth G. Lieberthal were anything but a China expert at the Brookings institution, his travelling-in-China security procedures would read like the product of a paranoid mind that watched too many spy movies as a kid:

He leaves his cellphone and laptop at home and instead brings “loaner” devices, which he erases before he leaves the United States and wipes clean the minute he returns. In China, he disables Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, never lets his phone out of his sight and, in meetings, not only turns off his phone but also removes the battery, for fear his microphone could be turned on remotely. He connects to the Internet only through an encrypted, password-protected channel, and copies and pastes his password from a USB thumb drive. He never types in a password directly, because, he said, “the Chinese are very good at installing key-logging software on your laptop.”

Talk about overkill, right? Well he’s not alone. The Times reports that these seemingly paranoid precautions are par for the course for just about anyone with valuable information including government officials, researchers, and even normal businessmen who do business in China.

But what about the rest of us? I may not have any valuable state secrets or research that needs protecting but that doesn’t mean I want the Chinese government snooping on my internetting when I visit my grandparents (especially when the consequences can be so severe). In the past, I’ve relied on a combination of VPNs, TOR, and password-protecting everything I can, but now it sounds like even that isn’t enough. Or maybe it’s totally overkill given my general unimportance in the grand scheme of things. Dear readers, I ask you, how much security is enough when it comes to the average person on vacation? [NY Times]

Image credit: Shutterstock/Rynio Productions

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Sunday, February 12th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

My Horrific Experiences With Sony Customer Support

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/my-horrific-experiences-with-sony-customer-support-2012-2


Sony laptopI have a Sony laptop computer. It is less than a year old. It was not cheap. I bought the best components, memory and hardware components options available including 3-year in home support.

A couple of months ago the monitor developed a problem (a line of dead pixels down the entire length of the screen). I knew it was a hardware failure because I run a dual monitor setup and the line did not appear on the second screen.

I ignored that problem because it was relatively minor. However a hard drive failure cannot be ignored. 

Unfortunately I experienced a hard drive failure at the beginning of January and was dead in the water. I could not boot.

Please follow this chain of events (Mac users, please try not to laugh too loudly).

My Sony Support Experience

  1. I called Sony support and told them of my problems. They told me my computer was out of warranty even though it was less than a year old and under standard warranty. I told them I had a 3 year warranty. They told me I they had no record of it but gave me another Sony phone number to call to verify my warranty.
  2. I suggested that rather than me hang up and dial Sony, that Sony should dial Sony and verify my service contract. The technical rep said that was not possible.
  3. I called the service number at Sony the tech rep gave me and that service rep verified my date of purchase as less than a year old. The service rep also gave me my 3-year in-home service contract number.
  4. I called back Sony technical support and gave them my service contract number. The technical rep said they could not find that service contact and would not help me. The tech rep told me to call back the service rep and get the right number.
  5. I called back up the service rep, and I did indeed have the right number. The service rep agreed to call the tech rep and stay on the line to verify the number. Apparently service can call technicians but not vice-versa. Some of these calls took 20 minutes.
  6. The service rep informed the technical rep of my purchase date of the service contract (less than a year old), and that it was for 3-years. At that point the tech rep agreed to help me. The service rep hung up.
  7. The tech rep then took my serial number and other information but said before he could schedule a service call he needed a copy of my receipt. I did not have a copy of my receipt. Given the Sony service rep verified my purchase date and 3 year service contract I failed to understand why I need a written receipt. As you might expect I was quite upset and talking rather loudly at this point.
  8. The service rep said he needed to know whether the computer was to be repaired under the service contract or the 1-year standard warranty. As you might imagine I did not see why any of this mattered as my date of purchase was confirmed by Sony as was my 3-year warranty.
  9. Well this mattered to the technician who demanded a receipt. The technician gave me a Sony website in which I could look up my order and get a receipt. I said “If I can go to a website on Sony and look up my order, why can’t you?”
  10. As you can probably guess from what has transpired so far, the tech rep could not do that. It was now late in the day and I had company over and a backup PC was working but without a lot of programs I frequently use and need. I waited overnight to get the receipt.
  11. The next day I attempted to get a receipt but the website URL the tech rep gave me was invalid. 
  12. Once again I called the service contract rep and that person gave me the right address. I said why don’t you look up my purchase day and get it to the tech but this time the service rep was uncooperative.
  13. I go to the Sony website and find my order. I print out my order and fax it to the tech rep. I call the tech rep number and the tech informs me he has scheduled a service call and someone would call me shortly to arrange a time within three days.
  14. I was suspicious of that claim, so the next day I called up the service rep who indeed verified the tech rep did not schedule a service call. 
  15. The service rep put in the order noting they had received my fax and that everything was in order.
  16. I was told I would get a call within 3 days. I was actually shocked to get a call the next day but the pleasant surprise quickly ended on news they had to order parts and I would get a another call within 3 days when the parts would be ready.
  17. Two days later the parts arrive and I get a call and schedule a time.
  18. The rep brings out another monitor and another hard drive. 
  19. The monitor is bad. It has a line of dead pixels in a different spot. 
  20. The tech rep installs the hard drive and leaves me with a set of install disks.
  21. One might think that the on-site technician might actually load the disks they delivered but one would be wrong. These guys are 100% without a doubt strictly hardware only. They do not load disks. Even ones they hand deliver.
  22. It is late in the evening and once again I had company. The next day I run the setup disks and get an I-O error. I cannot tell what is wrong. 
  23. I call Sony and they suspect another hard drive problem and tell me someone will call me within three days to schedule an appointment.
  24. I am screaming at the top of my lungs at this point as I have had it. The rep agrees to do nothing but schedule another call. I ask for his supervisor and an transferred to a “national customer relations specialist” NCRS.
  25. I ask the NCRS to send me a new computer. He tells me that the computer I have is no longer available. That was a direct lie because in advance (in expectation of lies) I had gone on the Sony website and could order the exact computer I already had. 
  26. I informed the NCRS that the computer was still orderable and he said he did not have the authority to do what I asked. If a national customer relations person does not have that authority, one has to wonder “Do they have ANY authority?”
  27. I asked to be transferred to his superior and was put on hold. His superior (and the NCRS refused to tell me the title of that person) would not take my call but whoever that person was did tell the NCRS that if the next delivery did not work they would pro-rate a refund.
  28. I demanded to talk to the NCRS superior but the NCRS would not comply.
  29. At that point I had had enough. I had been without my computer for 11 days and had loaded trial versions of software I use on another computer to get by, but I was still running in limited mode in a number of ways.
  30. I do an online search for computer repair for my city at 4:30 PM. The first two places did not answer the phone or had a messages they were closed. The owner of a third local repair shop in Barrington Illinois did answer the phone. He was open until 7:00PM and Barrington is only a half hour away.
  31. He agreed to look at my computer. I brought in my computer, the install DVDs Sony gave me, and an external hard drive backup I had of my computer.  He took one look at the install disks and said “this one is bad” (it had a discolored spot on the DVD). He changed the bios on my machine to boot to an external DVD drive and fortunately the external drive was able to read the install disks. It was now going on 8:00PM and the owner had stayed an hour past closing to help me but the configuration was only 70% done.
  32. The owner had to go but the next day when I called in, he had reset my drive to the original Sony state, removed all the Sony bloatware including Norton. He loaded all my personal files from an external hard drive I brought in. Above and beyond the call of duty, he found every ICON on my computer and went out and loaded trial versions of every software program I had.
  33. Now that is service. I had my Microsoft Office Key as well as keys to the other programs I use.  I had no idea how to configure my POP account at SBC on to my Microsoft Exchange account but he did that off the top of his head. By accident, I found someone (a business owner) who not only understands computers but someone who also understands the value of a customer.
  34. Five days later (two over the weekend) Sony did come by and replace my monitor. It might have been done sooner but I was out of town on Friday.

Moral of the Story

  • Have file backups. I did.
  • Don’t count on Sony
  • I have had bad experiences with Dell as well so don’t count on Dell or any other mass producer either.
  • Instead find a local computer shop that understands computers and the value of a customer.
If you live in NW Illinois, the place I found that helped me isBarringtonComputer. The owner is Richard Zatek.

By the way, I left out one interesting detail.

Barrington Computer has the ability to access a computer remotely. Zatek gave me a way to see what was happening remotely to my computer. When I checked on it at midnight (from my backup machine  at home), Zatek was also dialed into my computer and we exchanged messages right on my computer remotely using notepad, at midnight. We could see what each other was typing. That is pretty cool as well as exceptional service.

One good thing came out of this. I am pleased to have found someone who knows computers and also understands the value of a customer. Sony sure doesn’t.

 
Addendum
 
I received many emails regarding this post. Here is one from attorney “BR” who says …

Dear Mish,

I’m a big fan of your site and it is pretty much required reading for me most days. I read your account of your travails with “Big Corporate Customer service” with great empathy. I encountered a very similar experience two years ago getting a burner part replaced on my natural gas hot water heater. It took six weeks, 7 separate “house calls,” at least 15 different phone calls, and nearly being divorced before the problem was rectified. And it was a parts problem for which the company had issued a “recall,” so it wasn’t a unique or unexpected problem.

I’ve become convinced that this type of customer “service” is viewed as being a “feature” and not a “bug.” And it crosses all lines of products and services, but especially those covered by “warranties.” They are actively discouraging you from insisting on your right to the free repairs and other services for which you have already paid when you purchased your warranty. In my judgment it represents a calculated effort by corporate types to maximize the profits they obtain under extended warranty agreements. It really is a form of fraud.

Lesson learned is that while P.C. stands for piece of crap, warranties are worth even less.

Very truly yours,

BR

Addendum Two
 
I received many comments about the poor quality of consumer products. I failed to mention a possible remedy.
 
I asked the store owner if he custom built computers and he said it would not be cost-effective. After all, he still would be using components straight from China.
 
Instead he said, never buy a computer from a normal retail store or through the “consumer division” of a PC maker. Sony only has a a consumer divi! sion. HP and Dell have business divisions.
 
Unfortunately, that may not mean support will be much better, but rather the components will likely be of a higher quality. Large businesses might buy hundreds of computers or more at once. To get repeat business, the computers need to be more durable and have no built-in bloatware (trial software and other garbage).

Addendum Three
 
I received many emails like this from Mac users but here is one from a person at VMC Consulting Corporation with a email address at Microsoft.

Reading your recent “Horrific Experiences” post, I just want to make a friendly suggestion.

Next time you want the best Windows machine money can buy, get a Mac.

No kidding.

The Mac is the best Windows machine you can buy, and the support is fantastic. I don’t know where you live, but if it’s a major city, I bet there’s an Apple store nearby.

You can either use “Boot Camp” and run entirely in Windows, or you can be booted into the Mac OSX, and run Windows inside of Parallels, which is a fantastic Virtualization program.

Cheers,

David


This post originally appeared at Global Economic Trend Analysis. 

Please follow War Room on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

See Also:



Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012 news No Comments

Encrypting Your Hard Drive No Longer Works Against Federal Prosecution [Law]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5878709/encrypting-your-hard-drive-no-longer-works-against-federal-prosecution

Encrypting Your Hard Drive No Longer Works Against Federal ProsecutionSometimes common “street smarts” fail you. Like when you ask the guy who’s selling you drugs if he’s a cop. Or when you encrypt your hard drive and refuse to unlock it for prosecutors while citing the self-incriminating clause of the Fifth Amendment.

A federal court judge has just ruled that being forced to decrypt one’s hard drive during prosecution does not violate the defendants’s Fifth Amendment rights. The ruling stems from a case against Ramona Fricosu, who is charged with mortgage fraud. She has refused to decrypt the contents of her hard drive arguing that doing so would require her to essentially testify against herself.

Nuh-uh, said judge Robert Blackburn, citing an earlier ruling against one Sebastien Boucher. In that case, the courts decided that, while Boucher’s encryption password was certainly protected, the information on his drive could be considered evidence in the case and was therefore not subject to the same liberties.

“I find and conclude that the Fifth Amendment is not implicated by requiring production of the unencrypted contents of the Toshiba Satellite M305 laptop computer,” Blackburn wrote in his opinion today. He also cited the All Writs Act, a 1789 statute, could be invoked as well to force Fricosu’s compliance.

Friscosu has until February 21 to comply or face contempt of court charges. Geez, it’s getting to the point that your secrets are better left on microfilm in pumpkin patches rather than on your hard drive. [CNet via The Verge]

Image – Tatiana Popova / Shutterstock


drag2share – drag and drop RSS news items on your email contacts to share (click SEE DEMO)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, January 24th, 2012 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

Augustine Fou portrait
http://twitter.com/acfou
Send Tips: tips@go-digital.net
Digital Strategy Consulting
Dr. Augustine Fou LinkedIn Bio
Digital Marketing Slideshares
The Grand Unified Theory of Marketing