education

Teachers on Pinterest initiative could make lesson planning halfway enjoyable

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2013/08/13/teachers-on-pinterest-project-planning/

Teachers on Pinterest initiative could make lesson planning halfway enjoyable

Oh, education. So necessary, but so grueling. Particularly for oodles of grade-school instructors who are forced to swallow their fresh-out-of-college ambitions and fall into the system if they ever hope to level up in academia. We’ve seen glimmers of hope here and there, with certain schools getting outside of their comfort zones long enough to try new methodologies, and Pinterest’s latest project certainly holds a lot of promise. Teachers on Pinterest is a hub that showcases a variety of lesson plans and teaching tools, and through a partnership with Edutopia, it’s hoping to build out a full-bodied community for instructors. Hit up the source link below for a closer look, and remember: teachers rule.

 

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Tuesday, August 13th, 2013 news No Comments

drag2share: Everything You Wanted To Know About Mobile Moms

source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/businessinsider/~3/UNWBNKcFEks/mobile-moms-2013-7

Moms: They’re Just Like Us (Flurry)
Like their husbands, daughters, and sons, American Moms spend most of their time on mobile apps playing games. Across devices and platform, games account for at least 30% of their time spent on mobile. Social networking and games combined account for at least half their time-spend. Beyond games, moms tend to overindex on education and health and fitness apps. Interestingly, moms tend to gravitate towards iOS more than other Americans. The probable reason is that moms are more likely to own tablets than their non-maternal counterparts. Read >

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Wednesday, July 3rd, 2013 news No Comments

RedHoop Finds Classes from All the Major Online Course Providers

Source: http://lifehacker.com/search-all-the-major-online-course-providers-in-one-pla-510098706

RedHoop Finds Classes from All the Major Online Course Providers

You can learn just about anything online these days, thanks to many online course providers. The only problem: too many sites to visit and similar courses on the same topic. RedHoop helps you find courses to take from among the major providers, including Coursera and Khan Acadamy.

The site is essentially a search engine for online courses on various topics, from Java to Psychology. Search for your topic of interest across Udemy, Lynda.com, Khan Academy, Coursera, edX, and Udacity. You’ll find top-notch courses from major universities including MIT and Harvard.

When you browse the catalog by topic or category, you can see which ones are free, subscription based, or paid. If you search for a topic, you can filter the results by price, school, and category.

Overall, it’s a great way to find new classes to take (and supplement your Lifehacker University online education).

RedHoop

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Tuesday, May 28th, 2013 news No Comments

Google intros Play for Education, a curated portal for apps and books

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2013/05/15/google-intros-play-for-education-a-curated-portal-for-apps-and/

Google intros Play for Education, curates apps and books

Google’s making it easy for educators and their students to discover and recommend applications and books with Play for Education. Announced onstage at this year’s I/O by Chris Yerga, Google’s Android Engineering Director, the new Play storefront organizes content by education type, age and various other criteria to make the content discovery process simple for higher learning institutions. What’s more, all of the content that appears within this curated portal bears educators’ stamps of approval, so users know that what they’re accessing is tried-and-tested for quality.

Play for Education also makes use of Google+ groups, so schools and universities can quickly push apps, books and other content out to their students and even bill to one central account. A pilot program for the service has already been underway with six New Jersey schools ranking as current participants. Despite Google making the service official today, the actual sign-up window for general access won’t be until sometime later this fall. Though, developers can start submitting their applications right now.

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Wednesday, May 15th, 2013 news No Comments

Pearson buys a small stake in Nook Media, wants a fast track for digital education

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/12/28/pearson-buys-a-small-stake-in-nook-media/

Pearson buys a small stake in Nook Media, wants a fast track for educational ebooks

Publishers often want to work closely with e-book outlets — possibly a little too closely — but it’s rare that they involve themselves directly. Pearson is taking that uncommon step by making a 5 percent, $89.5 million investment in Nook Media, the joint venture between Barnes & Noble and Microsoft. Some of the reasoning won’t be made public until Barnes & Noble provides holiday sales results on January 3rd, but Pearson is clear that it’s furthering its online education plans: it wants Nook Media’s distribution skills to make a “seamless and effective experience for students.” Just when we’ll see this harmony is still up in the air, though. Nook Media has yet to outline what Microsoft’s partnership means for e-books and e-readers, let alone how Pearson factors in. We’re not expecting a sea change until companies start speaking up.

Continue reading Pearson buys a small stake in Nook Media, wants a fast track for digital education

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Saturday, December 29th, 2012 news No Comments

How Annual Tablet Sales Will Explode To 450 Million By 2016

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/bii-report-how-annual-tablet-sales-will-explode-to-450-million-by-2016-2012-11

tablet sales

In the two years since Apple launched the iPad,  the tablet market has exploded. When one includes Android and other tablets as well as e-readers, nearly 100 million tablets were sold in 2011.

Tablets and smartphones will not completely displace PCs. But they will quickly overwhelm them in terms of unit sales. When, where, how and to what degree this occurs will have tremendous implications across many businesses and industries. 

In a recent report from BI Intelligence, we estimate that tablet sales will reach 450 million units by 2016, and lay out the key analysis behind these forecasts. 

Access the Full Reports By Signing Up For A Free Trial Today >>>

Here are some of the growth drivers:

The report is full of charts and data that can be downloaded and put to use. 

In full, the report:

For full access to our Tablet Market report, sign up for a free trial subscription today.

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Friday, November 2nd, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/vip/~3/8wpGGRzhLC0/one-dmca-notice-took-down-145-million-education-blogs

One DMCA Notice Took Down 1.45 Million Education BlogsWe all know that DMCA notices are kinda dumb, but this is ridiculous: a single takedown request from Pearson, a textbook publisher, took down 1.45 million education blogs in one fell swoop.

Ars Technica reports that Pearson targeted a single page from 2007 that was using copyrighted material. Some form of miscommunication ensued, though, as EduBlogs, the host of the blog in question, found that all of its 1.45 million sites were taken down.

EduBlogs insists it was never given the chance to solve the problem itself—rather, the blogs were taken down by the overarching provider ServerBeach, to whom EduBlogs is a client. The whole problem was sorted in around 60 minutes, but that’s not really the point: rather, it highlights how dumb DMCA notices are and how badly they work. [Ars Technica]

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Tuesday, October 16th, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5948312/how-makers-are-desktop-fabricating-a-digital-revolution-of-things

How Makers Are Desktop-Fabricating a Revolution of ThingsWhen I was in high school in the late 1970’s, we had workshop class as part of the “Industrial Arts” curriculum. It wasn’t quite clear why this was a required credit—we lived in suburb of Washington, D.C., and there were no factories around and most of my friends’ parents were lawyers and government workers. But learning how to use workshop tools—band saws, table saws, drill presses, and the like—was just part of a mid-twentieth-century American education. The bad kids made ninja throwing stars; the worst made bongs. I made a crude magazine stand that my parents tolerated until I left home; I was lucky to have kept all my fingers through the process. Meanwhile, girls were steered to “Home Economics” to learn about sewing, cooking, and painting, which was, in a sense, another form of required crafting and DIY education.

At home, I made Heathkit electronics kits, which involved soldering irons and weeks of painstaking work with wires and components but were the cheapest way to obtain something like a citizen’s band radio or a stereo amplifier. Chemistry kits had actual chemicals in them (as opposed to little more than baking soda and a ream of legalist warnings, as is now sadly the case), and were great fun. Anybody with a cool or temperamental car spent the weekend under the hood with a wrench, hopping it up and otherwise tinkering with its mechanics. “Taking things apart to see how they work” was just what kids did, and finding users for the parts launched countless fantastic machines, some of which actually worked.

How Makers Are Desktop-Fabricating a Revolution of ThingsBut starting in the 1980s and 1990s, the romance of making things with your own hands started to fade. First manufacturing jobs were no longer a safe way to enter and stay in the middle class, and the workshop lost even its vocational appeal as the number of manufacturing workers in the employment rolls shrank. In its place came keyboards and screens. PCs were introduced, and all the good jobs used them; the school curriculum shifted to train kids to become “symbolic analysts,” to use the social-science phrase for white-collar information work. Computer class replaced shop class. School budget cuts in the 1990s were the nail in the coffin; once the generation of workshop teachers retired, they were rarely replaced; the tools were sold or put in storage.

Imported Asian electronics became better and cheaper than Heathkit gear, and the shift from individual electronic components like resistors and transistors and capacitors to inscrutable microchips and integrated circuits made soldering skills pointless. Electronics became disposable boxes with “no user serviceable parts inside,” as the warning labels put it. Heathkit left the kit business in 1992.

Cars evolved from carburetors and distributor caps that you could fiddle with to rule injection and electronic ignition that you couldn’t. Chips replaced mechanical parts. The new cars didn’t need as much maintenance, and even if you wanted to go under the hood there wasn’t much you could fix or modify, other than to change the oil and the oil filter. The working parts were hermetically sealed and locked down, a price we happily paid for reliability and minimal upkeep.

Just as shop class disappeared with school budget cuts, better opportunities in the workplace for women and gender equality killed Home Economics. Kids grew up with computer and video games, not wrenches and band saws. The best minds of a generation were seduced by software and the infinite worlds to be created online, and they made the digital age we all live in today. That is how the world shifted from atoms to bits. The transformation has gone on for thirty years, a generation, and it’s hard to argue with any of it.

But now, thirty years after “Industrial Arts” left the curriculum and large chunks of our manufacturing sectors have shifted overseas, there’s finally a reason to get your hands dirty again. As desktop fabrication tools go mainstream, it’s time to return “making things” to the high school curriculum, not as the shop class of old, but in the form of teaching design.

Today, schoolchildren learn how to use PowerPoint and Excel as part of their computer class, and they still learn to draw and sculpt in art class. But think how much better it would be if they could choose a third option: design class. Imagine a course where kids would learn to use free 3D CAD tools such as Sketchup or Autodesk 123D. Some would design buildings and fantastic structures, much as they sketch in their notebooks already. Others would create elaborate video game levels with landscapes and vehicles. And yet others would invent machines. Even better, imagine if each design classroom had a few 3D printers or a laser cutter. All those desktop design tools have a “Make” menu item. Kids could actually fabricate what they have drawn onscreen. Just consider what it would mean to them to hold something they dreamed up. This is how a generation of Makers will be created. This is how the next wave of manufacturing entrepreneurs will be born.

From the book: MAKERS: The New Industrial Revolution by Chris Anderson. Copyright 2012 by Chris Anderson. Published by arrangement with Crown Business, a division of Random House,

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Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

MIT and Harvard announce edX web education platform, make online learning cheap and easy

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/05/02/mit-and-harvard-announce-edx-web-education-platform-make-online/

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We’ll forgive you if you failed to take MIT up on its offer take its courses for free when it rolled out its MITx online learning platform last year. However, Harvard took notice of its efforts, and has joined MIT online to form the edX platform and offer courses and content for free on the web. There’s no word on the available subjects just yet, but video lessons, quizzes and online labs will all be a part of the curriculum, and those who comprehend the coursework can get a certificate of mastery upon completion. edX won’t just benefit those who log on, either, as it’ll be used to research how students learn and how technology can be used to improve teaching in both virtual and brick and mortar classrooms. The cost for this altruistic educational venture? 60 million dollars, with each party ponying up half. The first courses will be announced this summer, and classes are slated to start this fall. Want to know more? Check out the future of higher education more fully in the PR and video after the break.

Continue reading MIT and Harvard announce edX web education platform, make online learning cheap and easy

MIT and Harvard announce edX web education platform, make online learning cheap and easy originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 02 May 2012 18:39:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Wednesday, May 2nd, 2012 news No Comments

Where Do LinkedIn Users Work? (LNKD)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-where-do-linkedin-users-work-2012-2

LinkedIn has about 150 million users. In which industries do they work? Zoomsphere has the stats. We have the chart.

By the way, our guess is that the “higher education” category includes college students.

Chart of the day LinkedIn users

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Sunday, February 26th, 2012 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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