expert

How To Become A Thought Leader In Your Industry

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-become-a-thought-leader-in-your-industry-2012-12

Dan Waldschmidt

To become an expert, you need to have a voice that sets you apart from others in your field, but first, you need credibility to achieve this level of respect. 

There are plenty of bloggers out there who have thousands of followers listening to their tips and ideas. They have become thought leaders in their industries and their names appear alongside the title “expert.”

Dan Waldschmidt is a speaker, author, consultant and researcher. He’s been profiled in Business Insider, Business Week and Inc., and his book Edgy Conversations is scheduled to be published in March 2013.

But he doesn’t consider branding a part of his success, because it’s more of “a lifestyle than anything else,” Waldschmidt told us.

“I still reject this whole idea of branding. It’s branding when it’s on the side of a piece of beef,“ he said. “It’s hard to change. But life changes.”  At the age of 12, Waldschmidt started a lawn mowing business and by 19, he was the youngest sales manager for Sears when “Sears used to be Walmart.”

We recently caught up with Waldschmidt for his tips on how to be recognized as a thought leader in your industry. Here’s his advice:

1. Maintain a blog. “In 2005, I started blogging as a CEO,” Waldschmidt says. “I wrote about how lonely it was to be CEO.”

“When I wa! s in sal es, I was a hotshot and everybody loved me. When I became CEO, it was lonely so I started writing about some of these radical thoughts.”

Waldschmidt writes in his blog a few times a week and told us that he’s usually writing 15 posts at a time. If someone ticks me off, I write about it,” he said. “I’ll write the title, then I’ll think up the contents.”

2. Choose a voice—and stick to it. “Usually when I write something, it’s the exact opposite of what the other experts are saying,” he said.“And I see if I can back up the exact opposite of what they say.” At first, you will let the people who doubt you affect your own work, but after awhile, if you’re doing something right, those people will eventually need you, he maintains.

“They need the guy like me who puts everything out there and finds the solution for everyone else.” To set yourself apart, you need to have a specific voice, but don’t stress too much on holding on to this voice, because at some point, you voice will change.

3. Work really, really hard. “There’s a lot of ways to brand yourself,” Waldschmidt said. “For me, I have a relentless pursuit of getting it right.” And to become successful, he said that people need to stop thinking that the world owes them, because “no one owes you anything.”

“Get out there and make something of yourself. When you get knocked down, get back up.”

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Wednesday, December 5th, 2012 news No Comments

Why Michael Kors Is Having A Blockbuster Year

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/why-michael-kors-is-successful-2012-9

michael kors model

The Michael Kors brand has achieved unstoppable momentum even in the age of discount retailers.

The company recently raised its guidance again after blockbuster sales in the second quarter.

Meanwhile, other aspirational brands like Tiffany & Co. and Restoration Hardware are struggling.

Michael Kors succeeded because it was the first retailer to hit the market’s sweet spot: people with money to spend but who aren’t rich.

Luxury marketing expert Pam Danziger calls these people HENRYs, for “High Earners Not Rich Yet.” They are the people who make between $100,000 and $250,000, she says.

HENRYs are a growing segment, while the wealthiest people are making less than they used to.

Danziger explained the concept to us in a recent note:

Ultra-affluents (i.e. those at the top 2 percent of U.S. households with incomes starting at $250,000) cut their spending by nearly 30 percent from 2010, while the HENRYs (High Earners Not RichYet with incomes $100,000-$249,999) increased their spending on luxury by some 11 percent from 2009 levels. Even though HENRYs individually have a far lower spending threshold than ultra-affluents, there are nearly ten HENRY households for every ultra-affluent. That is why with a total of 21.3 million households, the HENRY segment is a critically important part of the consumer market.

With Michael Kors’ $450 handbags and $250 watches, HENRYs can show off their success without feeling like they’re going overboard.

Kors wisely chose the exact right audience, and now it’s pay! ing off.

DON’T MISS: The Real Reason People Line Up At The Apple Store >

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Friday, September 21st, 2012 news No Comments

These Are The Brands Taking Over America

Source: http://247wallst.com/2012/05/14/americas-hottest-brands/

24/7 Wall St. asked CoreBrand to identify America’s hottest brands. We wanted to know the biggest brands that were the best known and most well regarded.

Generally, most brand analysis done by the business press is biased toward dollar valuations and contributions to corporate earnings.

Obviously, financial success is one factor that demonstrates how well a brand is regarded by consumers.

But brand valuation is a financial view, and not one that relies entirely on consumer perception. Based on analysis performed by brand expert company CoreBrand, 24/7 Wall St. wanted to see brands through the eyes of the consumer.

For this reason, Corebrand examined brands from the standpoint of favorability and familiarity.

One of the most notable results of the analysis is the high ranking of brands not normally present on most highly valued brands list. When they are evaluated through the consumers’ eyes, however, brands that belong to companies that are struggling financially can still be high on a consumer-perception weighted list. These brands, naturally, are used by a large number of people. More than that, the consumer interaction with the product and services associated with the brand is positive.

Read the rest of the story at 24/7 Wall St >

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Monday, May 28th, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5884415/travelling-in-modern-china-requires-serious-secret-agent-skills

Travelling in Modern Day China Requires Cold War Era Secret Agent SkillsIf Kenneth G. Lieberthal were anything but a China expert at the Brookings institution, his travelling-in-China security procedures would read like the product of a paranoid mind that watched too many spy movies as a kid:

He leaves his cellphone and laptop at home and instead brings “loaner” devices, which he erases before he leaves the United States and wipes clean the minute he returns. In China, he disables Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, never lets his phone out of his sight and, in meetings, not only turns off his phone but also removes the battery, for fear his microphone could be turned on remotely. He connects to the Internet only through an encrypted, password-protected channel, and copies and pastes his password from a USB thumb drive. He never types in a password directly, because, he said, “the Chinese are very good at installing key-logging software on your laptop.”

Talk about overkill, right? Well he’s not alone. The Times reports that these seemingly paranoid precautions are par for the course for just about anyone with valuable information including government officials, researchers, and even normal businessmen who do business in China.

But what about the rest of us? I may not have any valuable state secrets or research that needs protecting but that doesn’t mean I want the Chinese government snooping on my internetting when I visit my grandparents (especially when the consequences can be so severe). In the past, I’ve relied on a combination of VPNs, TOR, and password-protecting everything I can, but now it sounds like even that isn’t enough. Or maybe it’s totally overkill given my general unimportance in the grand scheme of things. Dear readers, I ask you, how much security is enough when it comes to the average person on vacation? [NY Times]

Image credit: Shutterstock/Rynio Productions

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Sunday, February 12th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

I Read 21 Books About The Financial Crisis And They Explained Nothing

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/andrew-lo-21-books-financial-crisis-2012-2


andrew lo

Ever thought you would have to read 21 books to get to the bottom of what caused the financial crisis?

Andrew Lo, an economist at MIT, has some bad news: it’s going to take at least 22.

Lo, a leading expert on hedge funds and financial engineering, has written a paper (h/t NPR) for the Journal of Economic Literature describing his experience reading 21 books on the crisis — nine by journalists, 11 by academics and one by a former Treasury Secretary.

His conclusion: In a field that prides itself on its scientific rigor (however dismal), the books reveal that alarmingly few facts about the crisis have been agreed upon. Was there too little or too much regulation? How much of a factor were low interest rates? No one’s been able to say conclusively.

“After each book, I felt like I knew less,” Lo told NPR’s Planet Money.

Economics, he says, has fallen well short of that standard when it comes to understanding the crisis:

“Many of us like to think of financial economics as a science, but complex events like the financial crisis suggest that this conceit may be more wishful thinking than reality.”

Read Andrew Lo’s Reading About the Financial Crisis: A 21-Book Review >

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Monday, February 6th, 2012 news No Comments

Restaurants plan DNA-certified premium seafood

Source: http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-11-restaurants-dna-certified-premium-seafood.html

(AP) — Restaurants around the world will soon use new DNA technology to assure patrons they are being served the genuine fish fillet or caviar they ordered, rather than inferior substitutes, an expert in genetic identification says.


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Sunday, November 27th, 2011 news No Comments

Are Daily Deal Credit Cards On The Way?

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/are-daily-deal-credit-cards-on-the-way-2011-10


Groupon

With the daily deal market exploding, what’s next for sites like Groupon and LivingSocial?

Groupon Goods might be the answer on some expert’s lips, but according to CardHub CEO Odysseas Papadimitriou, branded credit cards look more likely. 

That’s because credit cards are easier for shoppers to use. Unlike a coupon, they work automatically and you can always store the cards in your wallet.

Credit cards would also simplify the redemption process in that consumers could easily swipe and credit 2, 3, or even 5% cash back to their account, for example. Plus the cards present a lucrative stream of revenue that only stands to be threatened by sophisticated card companies like American Express and Visa.

The demand is there, as a survey of 1,500 consumers conducted by Lightspeed Research revealed last month. More than a quarter (27%) of LivingSocial customers said they would be interested in a branded card, while more than a third (34%) of Groupon’s customers want one too.

But would daily deal credit cards be a boon to cash-strapped consumers or just passed off as a trend among the sites’ spendthrift regulars?

“Most likely it’s going to be something high end consumers who are spenders will want,” says Papadimitriou. “They won’t be making them their primary cards across the board, but people don’t usually make store-brand cards their primary cards anyway.”

This makes sense: Lightspeed found that relative to the overall U.S. credit cardholder population, Groupon and LivingSocial regulars tend to have better credit scores, are twice as likely to pay off their monthly card balances in full, and are three times as likely to make purchases with them. What’s more, about half are earning $75,000, so they can afford it. 

So while the cards wouldn’t do much to spark the economy on the whole—or soothe the millions of Americans desperate for a deal—they might do plenty to stoke spending among the credit elite. Which is exactly what Groupon or LivingSocial want, since most affinity cards are hard up to take on risky credit holders.

If you’re in the high end, however, think twice before signing up if a card is released, says Papadimitriou. 

“As with all co-branded cards, if you’re already a loyal customer and are spending a lot of money—say more than $2,000 to $3,000 a year, then get that branded card because it will likely be useful. But if you’re not a loyal customer or a frequent spender with that company, then don’t worry about it.”

 

 

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Tuesday, October 4th, 2011 news No Comments

ClickZ articles by Augustine Fou, PhD

Dr. Augustine Fou is Group Chief Digital Officer of Omnicom’s Healthcare Consultancy Group. He has nearly 15 years of digital strategy consulting experience and is an expert in data mining, analytics, and consumer insights research, with specific knowledge in the consumer payments, packaged goods, food/beverage, retail/apparel, and healthcare sectors.

Dr. Fou has provided strategic counsel on the use and integration of online marketing to clients such as AT&T, IBM, Intel, ExxonMobil, MasterCard, Unilever, Pepsi, DrPepper, Frito Lay, Taco Bell. KFC. Atari, Conde Nast, Hachette Filipacchi, Victoria’s Secret, Liz Claiborne, and others. He has served as expert witness on online payments for the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and advised government agencies such as the Norwegian Trade Counsel, the Gouvernement du Quebec, Invest in Sweden Agency, and the Canadian Consulate.

Dr. Fou is an Adjunct Professor at New York University in the Integrated Marketing Department of the School for Continuing and Professional Studies. He also writes a monthly column for ClickZ’s Experts Columns on Integrated Marketing and is a frequent speaker and panelist at online and advertising industry conferences.

He started his career with McKinsey & Company and recently served as SVP, Digital Lead at McCann/MRM Worldwide. Dr. Fou completed his PhD at MIT at the age of 23 in the Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering.

Recent articles by Augustine Fou

The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply, Part 3
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The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing No Longer Apply
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Is Believing in Behavioral Targeting Like Believing in Santa?
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What’s Wrong With the Net Promoter Score
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How to Do Social Marketing in Heavily Regulated Industries
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Metrics, Metrics Everywhere
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Search Improves All Marketing Aspects
Search is much more than just an opportunity for marketers to push out another Nov 20, 2008

Social Commerce: In Friends We Trust
How to integrate social networks into your marketing (1 comments) Nov 6, 2008

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Sunday, April 4th, 2010 digital No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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