failure

Most Important Factor for Digital Outcomes? Senior Management Buy-In

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/interactive/most-important-factor-for-digital-outcomes-senior-management-buy-in-36412/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

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Considering that respondents separately indicated that CEOs are taking a more active role in new digital initiatives, that’s a positive sign for future efforts.

After senior management buy-in (32%), the most commonly-cited factors of success also were managerial: internal leadership (30%); alignment between organizational structure and initiative’s goals (21%); and good management of and sufficient organizational support for the initiative (also 21%).

By contrast, the leading factors of failure (after senior management buy-in – 23%) were the lack of technology infrastructure and IT systems (22%) and quality data (21%), although the absence of internal leadership also ranked relatively highly (17%). Those results imply that not only is senior management buy-in necessary to avoid failure, but so is cooperation with the IT department. But, a recent study from Accenture suggest that such collaboration is fraught with obstacles, with 44% of CMOs surveyed saying there is no need for alignment with the CIO, indicating that there’s more work to be done on this end.

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Friday, September 6th, 2013 news No Comments

drag2share: Microsoft Is Down 8 Percent As The World Realizes The Windows Business Has Collapsed (And Probably Isn’t Coming Back)

source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/businessinsider/~3/NG6Rf44mtTA/microsoft-stock-2013-7

Steve Ballmer waving

Microsoft is down 8% pre-market this morning.

The stock has been doing worse and worse since the company released earnings. Initial reaction to the release sent the stock down 2.5%. Then it was 5%, then 6% … and now it’s down 8%.

Microsoft’s Windows business is finally feeling the effect of the collapse of the PC industry, and the failure of Windows 8 to slow the iPad.


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Friday, July 19th, 2013 news No Comments

It’s Time For More Tiny Ad Tech Companies To Die, Says Luma Partners

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/luma-partners-on-ma-right-now-2013-2

Terence Kawaja

The ad tech industry is still too crowded, says boutique investment bank Luma Partners in a new post.

More “marginal companies” in ad tech need to die, or get acquired, it says.

Luma is led by Terry Kawaja, an ad tech industry icon in New York. Luma produces graphics that detail the convoluted state of the ad tech industry. Its main trade is figuring out who’s buying who and then consulting companies involved in the acquisitions.

Years ago Kawaja expected the ad tech business to be radically altered by M&A and failure. So far, neither has happened on the scale he expected.

Today, he’s trying to figure out what’s going on.

He blames the lack of failures on a vibrant VC system that keeps funneling money into companies. As for the M&A, he doesn’t really have much of an explanation.

However, he thinks (hopes?) all of this is about to change based on three things he saw last week:

  • MediaMath bought Akamai’s ADS (Acerno) business.
  • AppNexus raised $75 million.
  • AdBrite closed shop.

He believes VCs are going to suddenly get more intelligent about where they put their money, focusing on bigger companies that look like they’re actually going to succeed, like AppNexus. Those bigger companies, with more cash on hand are going to buy smaller companies, like MediaMath.

As the VCs get smarter about where they put their money the smaller ad tech companies like AdBrite are going to die off or get bought.

The ad tech business has long been crowded with tiny shops set up in the hope of getting flipped. The money flowing into the system has been a topic of conversation for years now. Perhaps Kawaja is right, and this time things really are different. Perhaps a shake out is fi! nally go ing to happen.

Please follow SAI on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story

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Monday, February 4th, 2013 news No Comments

It’s Time To Admit That Hulu Is A Failure (DIS, NWS)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/its-time-to-admit-that-hulu-is-a-failure-2012-12

Jason Kilar

This morning, a Wall Street Journal story by

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Friday, December 21st, 2012 news No Comments

Twitter was Really Freaking Broken Today

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5929408/heres-why-twitter-was-so-broken-today

Here's Why Twitter Was So BrokenTwitter was really freaking broken today. Which, well, sucked. Here’s what Mazen Rawashdeh, Twitter’s VP of Engineering, has to say about the outage.

The cause of today’s outage came from within our data centers. Data centers are designed to be redundant: when one system fails (as everything does at one time or another), a parallel system takes over. What was noteworthy about today’s outage was the coincidental failure of two parallel systems at nearly the same time.

And that was that. Rawashdeh apologized earnestly in the blog post, noting that Twitter can’t pin this to the Olympics or an external bug—just two parallel systems coincidentally going down at the same time. [Twitter]

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Friday, July 27th, 2012 digital No Comments

Comcast’s extra ads ruin NFC championship game conclusion in some areas

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/01/23/comcast-xfinity-ads-interrupt-nfc-championship/

It wasn’t just RIM that had designs on the limelight during the football action last night. Comcast commercials appeared over the NFC Championship game last night, thoughtfully playing over the climax of the match ‘twixt the Giants and the 49ers. Frustrated fans who missed out on parts of the fourth quarter and overtime promptly began voicing dissent on the company’s support forums. The Washington Post has a quote from spokesperson Amiee Metrick indicating the problems were due to a possible “equipment failure” at a local Fox affiliate, WTTG, resulting in the ill-timed ads reported in Washington D.C. We’ve heard that of customers receiving a $10 credit and an apology, but it seems unlikely to soothe the brow of those — like the person who recorded video of the incident you can see after the break — thinking of switching to FiOS.

Update: We’ve received a response from Comcast (included after the break), and updated the post to clarify the apparent breakdown was at local Fox affiliate WTTG.

[Thanks, John]

Continue reading Comcast’s extra ads ruin NFC championship game conclusion in some areas

Comcast’s extra ads ruin NFC championship game conclusion in some areas originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 23 Jan 2012 15:22:00 EDT. P! lease se e our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceComcast forums, Washington Post  | Email this | Comments


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Tuesday, January 24th, 2012 news No Comments

"Success Comes Through Rapidly Fixing our Mistakes Rather than Getting Things Right the First Time" [Quotables]

Source: http://lifehacker.com/5842592/success-comes-through-rapidly-fixing-our-mistakes-rather-than-getting-things-right-first-time

"Success Comes Through Rapidly Fixing our Mistakes Rather than Getting Things Right the First Time"This quote comes from Tim Harford, who argues that success is really just a product of failure. He believes we have to try, fail, and quickly correct our mistakes in order to properly succeed. Because failure is just an inevitability, no matter who you are, the key is to get better at recovering from it rather than trying to avoid it altogether.

Harford suggests that there are a few key things we need to pay attention to when dealing with failure. First is avoiding the denial that we’re wrong. He says, “It seems to be the hardest thing in the world to admit we’ve made a mistake and try to put it right. It requires you to challenge a status quo of your own making.” Sometimes we’ll go so far as to chase our losses just to avoid failure, as if accepting the failed situation will make all our effort worthless. In the end, we can’t predict what’s going to work. We can only experiment with trial and error. Failure is an important part of this process, and accepting it makes us capable of actually finding success in the long run.

For more information, check out the full article on The 99 Percent. For another take on the same idea, check out this article in the New York Times.

Why Success Always Starts With Failure | The 99 Percent


You can follow Adam Dachis, the author of this post, on Twitter, Google+, and Facebook.  Twitter’s the best way to contact him, too.


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Thursday, September 22nd, 2011 news No Comments

A Tale of Two Food-Named Financial Aggregation Sites – Wesabe vs Mint

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Thursday, October 21st, 2010 digital No Comments

Adobe says iPhone / iPad adoption and ‘alternative technologies’ (cough, HTML5) could harm its business

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2010/04/09/adobe-says-iphone-ipad-adoption-and-alternative-technologies/

Adobe might continue to crow about Flash and its importance on both the desktop and mobile devices, but there’s no lying to investors, and the company is pretty blunt about the threat of the iPhone and iPad in the end-of-quarter Form 10-Q it just filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission: it flatly says that “to the extent new releases of operating systems or other third-party products, platforms or devices, such as the Apple iPhone or iPad, make it more difficult for our products to perform, and our customers are persuaded to use alternative technologies, our business could be harmed.”

Now, Adobe has to make doom-and-gloom statements in its SEC filings — it also says that slowing PC sales or a failure to keep up with desktop OS development could harm its business — but the timing is crazy here, since just yesterday Apple changed the iPhone OS 4 SDK agreement to block devs from using the upcoming Flash CS5 iPhone cross-compiler to build iPhone apps. What’s more, Apple’s also using HTML5 for its new iAd platform, which could potentially undo Flash’s stranglehold on online advertising as well. Yeah, we’d say all that plus the recent push for HTML5 video across the web — and from Microsoft — could harm Adobe’s business just a little. Better hope that final version of Flash Player 10.1 is everything we’d hoped and dreamed of, because Adobe’s going to have to make a real stand here.

Adobe says iPhone / iPad adoption and ‘alternative technologies’ (cough, HTML5) could harm its business originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 09 Apr 2010 11:50:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink BusinessWeek  |  sourceAdobe Form 10-Q  | Email this | Comments

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Saturday, April 10th, 2010 news No Comments

"We Are Not Prepared"

Source: http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2010-02/washington-war-games-simulate-crippling-cyber-attack-us

Washington insiders recently sweated out a real-time war game where a cyberattack crippled cell phone service, Internet and even electrical grids across the U.S. The unscripted, dynamic simulation allowed former White House officials and the Bipartisan Policy Center to study the problems that might arise during a real cyberattack emergency, according to Aviation Week’s Ares Defense Blog.

The Policy Center’s vice-president reports “”The general consensus of the panel today was that we are not prepared to deal with these kinds of attacks.”

The nightmarish scenario that unfolded represented a worst-case example. As former secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff noted, many cyberattacks can be stopped if individual cell phone or Internet users simply follow the best practices and use the right tools. Similarly, another participant pointed out that private Internet companies would not sit idly by as a virus ran amok.

A collapse of power across the U.S. also only took place when the simulation brought in factors such as high demand during the summer, a hurricane that had damaged power supply lines, and coordinated bombings that accompanied the cyberattack and subsequent failure of the Internet.

Still, the war game highlighted crucial issues about the government’s own reliance upon communications that might go down during a real-life scenario. One of the biggest problems was how the President ought to respond to a situation that caused damage like warfare but lacked an immediately identifiable foreign adversary. Smaller-scale cyberattacks have already complicated real-world diplomacy, such as the alleged Chinese cyberattacks on Google and other U.S. companies.

Ares Defense Blog questioned a curious missing element from the simulation, in that there was no mention of what happened to phone or Internet service in the rest of the world. Surely a nation that decided to launch cyberattacks against the U.S. would take safeguards to protect its own crucial communication services, which would possibly help U.S. officials narrow down the list of suspects.

Another question seemed more mundane but equally important — how would the government activate the National Guard with cell phone service down?

The Pentagon’s DARPA science lab recently pushed for a “Cyber Genome Program” that could trace digital fingerprints to cyberattack culprits. But identifying whether a cyber attack came from individual civilians, shadowy hacker associations or government cyber-warriors has proven tricky in the meantime.

[via Ares Defense Blog]

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Friday, February 19th, 2010 digital No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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