Film

Google And Yahoo! Ad Networks Accused Of Helping Finance Online Piracy

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/google-and-yahoo-ad-networks-accused-of-financing-online-piracy-2013-1

keiraknightley pirates

Tech giants Google and Yahoo are among the worst offending ad networks that help financially fund major film and music pirating sites around the world, according to a new report by USC’s Annenberg Innovation Lab.

Using Google’s own Transparency Report as a guide, USC named the 10 ad networks that place the most ads on pirate sites, based on the most DMCA Takedown requests

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Thursday, January 3rd, 2013 news No Comments

27k projects, almost $100 million in funding

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/01/11/kickstarter-details-the-year-that-was-27k-projects-almost-100/

Just how big a year was 2011 for Kickstarter? Very nearly a $100 million dollar year. That was the total amount of funding pledged on the crowd-sourced site during the year ($99,344,382, specifically), which is up considerably from the $27.6 million pledged in 2010. That was generated by just over 27,000 projects, 11,836 of which reached their funding goals (a success rate of 46%, up from 43% in 2010). What’s more, while tech-related projects may generate the most attention ’round these parts, film and music projects were actually the two biggest cash draws on the site (netting $32 million and $19 million, respectively). Hit the source link below for the company’s complete wrap-up.

Kickstarter details the year that was: 27k projects, almost $100 million in funding originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 11 Jan 2012 01:10:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Wednesday, January 11th, 2012 news No Comments

How a Small Studio Pulled Off a Major 3-D Film Using Energy-Saving Technology

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5583881/how-a-small-studio-pulled-off-a-major-3+d-film-using-energy+saving-technology

Despicable MeTraditionally, only the mammoth Hollywood studios could afford to work with 3D—it’s too expensive to build the necessary, air-conditioned 24 hours a day, server farms. The company behind Despicable Me decided to try something new, and cut the AC.

Illumination Entertainment, the company behind Despicable Me, decided to try something new. Instead of using air-conditioned server farms to render images, the company asked IBM to built a customized server farm using the iDataPlex system, a processing system that cuts down on energy use by 40% compared to traditional server farms.

The iDataPlex has two key advantages: a flexible configuration that doubles the amount of systems that can run in a single IBM rack and the ability to run an ambient temperature room (no costly air-conditioning required). The system has been on the market for over a year, but Illumination is the first studio to use it for animated film.

This doesn’t mean that any scrappy studio with a dream can now produce a high-end 3-D animated film. Illumination used a 330-person team of artists, producers, and support staff to produce 142 terabytes of data. And the rendering farm, which processed up to 500,000 frames per week, was built in conjunction with Mac Guff Ligne, a French digital production studio.

But the iDataPlex gives Illumination a leg up in the graphics rendering process. Illumination Entertainment’s server farm, for example, is the size of four parking spots. That’s half the amount of space the company initially allotted to the farm. “Oftentimes a small studio like Illumination really wants to put their energy behind creating as compelling of content as possible,” explains Steve Canepa, Vice President, Media & Entertainment Industry at IBM. “By minimizing the technological issues associated with building and managing the [rendering] environment, we allow studios to reduce the amount of time, energy, and resources necessary to create an underlying technological platform.”

It’s a compelling idea for studios—even major ones—that want to cut costs and look environmentally conscious at the same time. IBM is already working with a number of other studios to implement similar solutions. Canepa concedes that studios could build similar systems by purchasing off-the-shelf racks and processors, but the iDataPlex’s unique configuration of servers packs a lot of processing power into a small space—and that’s not easy to replicate. Don’t expect these rigs to be appearing in suburban garages anytime soon.

How a Small Studio Pulled Off a Major 3-D Film Using Energy-Saving TechnologyFast Company empowers innovators to challenge convention and create the future of business.

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Monday, July 12th, 2010 news No Comments

Movie Tickets Reach $20

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5544536/movie-tickets-reach-20

Movie Tickets Reach Starting with Shrek Forever After, three AMC theaters in New York will begin selling $20 adult movie tickets on their IMAX screens. Even for a loose-moneyed film buff like me, that’s just too much.

After The Dark Knight, the industry realized just how much IMAX ticket prices could bolster profits. After Avatar and Alice In Wonderland, the same proved true, along with the enticement of 3D.

(Evidently, domestic grosses of $533,345,358, $748,590,960 and $331,666,06, respectively, weren’t enough for Hollywood—nor was the fact that Avatar made $120,000,000 just on IMAX screens, just in the US.)

So a more extreme version of gouging begins at theaters. And just as the public cried about $10 movie tickets while continuing to flood the theaters in droves, many will still pay $20 to see the latest Shrek, complaining about it until they forget that the world was ever any different.

But you know what? I won’t, not now or in the near future. And I’m about as fiscally irresponsible and movie obsessed as idiots come. That’s a bad sign for movie theaters and studios alike, as it means the more sane amongst you will bail on theaters for sure (if you haven’t already).

(Oh, but compared to movie theater popcorn, tickets are still pretty cheap!) [WSJ]

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Friday, May 21st, 2010 news No Comments

YouTube Quietly Adds Movie and TV Show Rentals From 99 Cents

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5522756/youtube-quietly-adds-movie-and-tv-show-rentals-from-99-cents

YouTube Quietly Adds Movie and TV Show Rentals From 99 CentsAfter tinkering with movie rentals in January, YouTube’s added a bunch of movies and TV episodes you actually want to see. We’re not just talking art-house Sundance Film Festival flicks—now, you can get a bit of anime too.

There’s still nothing particularly mainstream on the YouTube store, with indie films, Bollywood stuff and documentaries mostly on offer, viewable for 48 hours after renting. They cost between 99 cents and $4, with payments made via Google Check-Out.

It’s a worthy competitor to iTunes and the various gaming consoles that offer downloads, but I think it’s obvious to all that YouTube still needs to strike some deals with movie studios to get some decent stuff up on the site. What happened to the WSJ’s reports last year that Lion’s Gate, Sony and Warner Bros were in negotiations with Google, eh? [ReadWriteWeb via TechRadar]

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Friday, April 23rd, 2010 news 1 Comment

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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