Fire

Google Is Selling Almost 1 Million Nexus 7 Tablets Per Month (GOOG)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/google-nexus-7-sales-2012-10

google nexus 7 back

Google is selling almost one million Nexus 7 tablets per month, according to Asustek CFO David Chang.

Chang tells the Wall Street Journal, “At the beginning, it was, for instance, 500K units a month, then maybe 600, 700K. This latest month, it was close to 1 million.”

The Nexus 7 is a $199 seven-inch tablet, Google designed in conjunction with Asustek. It is Google’s attempt to slow sales of Amazon’s Kindle Fire, and challenge Apple’s iPad dominance.

It is also Google’s best effort at creating a true tablet computing experience with Android. While Android is the leading smartphone operating system, Apple’s iOS is leading in tablets.

Apple sold 14 million iPads last quarter, which is roughly 1 million per week. So, Google is still far behind. But this increasing growth is encouraging, and perhaps one of the reasons Apple decided to release a cheaper iPad mini.

Please follow SAI on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012 news No Comments

We Had Our Best Day Of Kindle Fire HD Sales After Apple Announced The iPad Mini (AAPL, AMZN)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/amazon-kindle-fire-sales-after-ipad-mini-2012-10

jeff bezos

Amazon has another chest-thumping, but detail free, proclamation about Kindle sales.

It tells All Things D, “Wednesday was the $199 Kindle Fire HD’s biggest day of sales since launch and up 3x week over week.”

Apple announced the iPad mini on Tuesday, so the clear suggestion is that people waited to see what Apple was releasing. Once they saw it, they opted for Amazon’s less expensive option.

With Amazon, though, we really have no idea what that statement means. It doesn’t provide any details on Kindle unit sales. For all we know, the company sold 200 Kindle Fire HDs on Wednesday.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Saturday, October 27th, 2012 digital No Comments

Amazon Somehow Lost $274 Million Selling $13.8 Billion Worth of Stuff

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5954990/amazon-manages-to-lose-274-million-while-selling-138-billion-worth-of-stuff

Amazon Somehow Lost $274 Million Selling $13.8 Billion Worth of StuffIf you thought Amazon’s prices seemed too good to be true, well, it turns out they might be—for Amazon, at least. The company managed to turn $13.8 billion of revenue into a $274 million loss this past quarter. And while a big chunk of that was due to losses at LivingSocial and foreign-exchange rates, all is clearly not well on Mount Bezos.

Amazon remained silent on just how many Kindle devices it has sold, but reiterated that it doesn’t make any money off of the ones that it has. Said CEO and probably Superman villain Jeff Bezos:

“Our approach is to work hard to charge less. Sell devices near breakeven and you can pack a lot of sophisticated hardware into a very low price point… And our approach is working—the $199 Kindle Fire HD is the #1 bestselling product across Amazon worldwide. Incredibly, this is true even as measured by unit sales.”

The approach may be working in terms of moving units, but that clearly has been translating into less and less profit. But hey, that just means you’re getting every bit the bargain you thought you were.

The biggest killer appears to be that LivingSocial investment; while Amazon doesn’t own the daily deals company outright, it has a major stake in its flailing business. One that amounted to a $169 million hit against its bottom line these last three months alone.

Amazon’s going to be holding a call at 5PM EDT to discuss what happened in more detail; we’ll be updating as necessary. For now, though, clearly Amazon looks like a ship that needs righting. Or maybe it just needs to throw off some of that LivingSocial ballast. [Businesswire]

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday, October 26th, 2012 news No Comments

Even Gruber Says Apple Passed Up ‘A Sure Thing’ Charging So Much For The iPad Mini (AAPL)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/gruber-apple-passed-up-a-sure-thing-with-ipad-mini-pricing-2012-10

ipad mini official

A lot of people are upset about the iPad Mini’s price.

Even John Gruber of Daring Fireball says that Apple passed on a “sure thing” making the iPad so much more expensive than Google’s Nexus 7 or the Kindle Fire

“Better but costs more” is a gamble. “Better and costs the same or less” is a sure thing. And the iPad is hard to compare to any previous Apple product other than the iPod. The iPod and iPad didn’t enter mature markets — they entered nascent markets with no strong competitors and established themselves as unquestioned market leaders. The iPad Mini’s $329 starting point leaves a price umbrella in tablets that Apple never left for MP3 player competitors.

Don’t Miss: Don’t Buy An iPad Mini (Yet)! >

Please follow SAI on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, October 25th, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5949150/the-single-biggest-question-about-the-ipad-mini

The Single Biggest Question About the iPad MiniLike the iPhone 5 before it, the unannounced iPad Mini has—through leaks and logic—made itself essentially a known quantity. Let’s assume for a second that we know what it looks like, how big it is, and what guts will power it. It’s a safe assumption.

With just a few weeks until a rumored launch, we have a jigsaw puzzle device that’s missing just one piece: price. And how Apple fills that in will have huge repercussions for the iPad Mini—and the company itself.

This is what we can say with some certainty about Apple’s tiny tablet: It will look somewhere between a large iPhone and a small iPad, will have a 7.85-inch display that’s not quite retina, will share guts with the iPad 2 and iPod touch, and will be announced sometime in the next several weeks. It will likely come in black, anodized aluminum, and possibly white. There could very well be a 3G version.

That makes price the only real question left. It’s also the one Apple’s going to have the hardest time answering.

A Premium Blend

This should be easy. After all, unlike the iPad—which established the 10-inch tablet market to Apple’s devastating advantage—there are already a host of 7-inchers in the world. There have been for some time; long enough, at least, to cement consumer expectations of what a 7-inch tablet should cost. And that amount is between $200 and $250.

So, no problem! Let’s say the iPad Mini starts at 16GB (reasonable, since all the other iPads do). That would put it up against the equivalent $200 Kindle Fire HD, the $230 Nook HD, and the $250 Nexus 7. Assuming Apple doesn’t mind sitting on top of the pricing totem pole, $300 makes perfect sense. Done.

But let’s take one more look at those devices. The Nook HD has the best display of any 7-inch tablet, and an OMAP processor that outclocks the Kindle Fire, and the Nexus 7 (and iPad Mini’s rumored A5). In fact, at that $300 price point you could score a 32GB, 9-inch Nook HD+. Similarly, the Nexus 7 can match any tablet on design, has a blazing Tegra 3 processor and 1GB of RAM muscling a silky Android Jelly Bean platform, a near-retina display, and the full might of the Google Play store behind it. In both cases, at $300 Apple would be asking people to pay significantly more for a product that offers, on many fronts, less.

Then there’s the Kindle Fire HD, from a company with nearly as much brand recognition as Apple, a content ecosystem that beats the crap out of iTunes, a retina display. All for—again, hypothetically—a hundred bucks cheaper. In fact, for $300 you can get 9-inch, retina display Kindle Fire HD, a free month of Amazon Prime, and (in most places, still) not pay taxes on any of it. Buying that over a smaller, less equipped iPad Mini may not be a no-brainer. But it’s closer to one than Apple should be comfortable with.

So why not go cheaper? It’s not that Apple can’t afford to. It’s that it doesn’t appear to want to.

The iPod Precedent

One of the not-so-secrets to Apple’s retail success is that it keeps things like pricing so simple you don’t have to give it much thought. Nearly every product in the Apple Store—the Shuffle, the nano, and the 3G iPads being the exceptions—costs a multiple of $100. Want the slightly better version of something? That’ll be a Benjamin.

It’s such an established system, in fact, that Apple may have priced itself into a corner. An iPad Mini would fall squarely between two devices: the iPod touch and the iPad. It’s expected to share the same processor with both, and will roughly split the difference in size. The 32GB iPod touch—the smallest available model—costs $300. The entry-level 16GB iPad 2 costs $400. It’s nearly impossible to imagine the iPad Mini costing less than the former and more than the latter. It would be confusing, and Apple hates confusion.

The Single Biggest Question About the iPad MiniBut $300 for a 16GB iPad Mini would be the sweet spot, wouldn’t it? Especially given that $100 increment fetish. Start with the $300 32GB iPod touch, add size (+$100), subtract storage (-$100), end up at $300. Start with the $400 iPad 2, subtract size (-$100), keep everything else the same, end up at $300. It also happens to fill in the pricing pattern every iProduct has marched to since forever (left, via Ryan Jones).

When Apple refreshed its iPod touch line-up just last month, it could’ve easily set a lower price in anticipation of the incoming iPad Mini. But it didn’t. And that’s worrisome.

Regression to the Mean

Not too long ago, people happily paid an Apple premium. You’d spend more for the same basic product because you trusted the brand and appreciated the aesthetic. Apple made a lot less money back then.

Now, though? Look around. Intel had to pay out $300 million to ultrabook OEMs to keep up with MacBook Air pricing. It’s commonplace for top-shelf Android handsets to start at $300 on contract; the iPhone still comes in at (a heavily subsidized) $200.

And then there’s the iPad. It’s easy to forget now, but one of the most remarkable things about the original Apple tablet was its price. It was cheap, for what it was, a budget Adonis forged by Tim Cook’s supply chain heroics and Apple Store retail efficiency. It took a year for Apple’s competitors to produce a reasonably decent 10-inch tablet at $500, and another to drive the price down to $400. And still no one buys them.

People buy the Kindle Fire, though. By the millions. The small tablet market is mature and competitive in a way that the 10-inch market—outside of the iPad itself—has never been. The Toshiba Thrive is Glass Joe; the Nexus 7 is Mr. Sandman. And it’s way cheaper than $300.

How Apple prices the iPad Mini matters beyond just the number of units it sells. If it’s less than $300, CEO Tim Cook has keyed into the threat that Amazon and Google pose to its handheld computing empire. And he’ll crush them. If not? Then it’s another sign—along with Maps, along with that $30 dock connector adapter—that the old Apple hubris might be sneaking back in. The kind that dominated back when Apple was cool and niche, not the most successful business in the world.

So maybe the biggest question about the iPad Mini isn’t really price after all. Maybe it’s: What kind of company does Apple want to be?

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday, October 5th, 2012 news No Comments

Facebook Denies Targeting Users Based On Interests

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-denies-targeting-users-based-on-interests–todays-ad-brief-2012-9

Facebook denies targeting users based on their interests, but not everyone believes the company.

Amazon does a U-turn and will offer an ad-free Kindle Fire for a $15 premium.

Procter & Gamble: former client-side exec Judy Beaudry vents her fury against media rebates, an issue we told you about earlier this month.

Meet the 20 most influential marketing spenders, per Ad Age.

Cravendale has launched its new “cats with thumbs” video (above). We told you it was coming earlier this month.

LIONSGATE HAS PUT ITS $400 MILLION MEDIA ACCOUNT IN REVIEW: The incumbents are Initiative and Mindshare; Horizon will also compete, Ad Age says. “Hunger Games” and “Twilight” are among the titles on the business.

LendingTree picked a new creative shop, Merkley + Partners, and will break its first campaign in the spring. The New York shop beat McK! inney in Durham, N.C., and Anthem Worldwide in San Francisco for the business. Spending is ~$22 million.

MDC Partners’ credit rating was lowered by Standard & Poor’s from B+ to B, with the ratings service saying it expects the holding company’s debt level to remain high over the next 12 to 18 months.

Crispin Porter + Bogusky‘s chief digital officer Ivan Perez-Armendariz has some deep thoughts about Facebook and Google.

Previously on BI:

Please follow Advertising on p://twit ter.com/BI_Advertising”>Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Monday, September 10th, 2012 news No Comments

opt-out exists)

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/09/07/amazon-silk-browser-on-kindle-fire-tracks-page-visits/

Amazon Silk browser on Kindle Fire tracks page visits to generate trends, isn't as spook

When you pick up that new Kindle Fire HD this fall, one of the first things you’ll notice is an updated version of Amazon’s Silk web browser with a Trending Now section. It’s a clever trick that takes advantage of Silk’s server-based caching to find out what sites are popular among owners. That sounds good on the surface, but it doesn’t take much effort to realize that there are privacy concerns already in the air — Amazon is sharing personal web habits with a wider audience, after all. While the section is unlikely to include any identifying information, there’s no immediate sign that tablet owners can keep their behavior private, and that could create some indignation among those who’d prefer to surf in isolation. We’ve asked Amazon if there will be an opt-out escape hatch and will let you know if there’s a definitive answer. In the meantime, we wouldn’t necessarily worry. Silk shouldn’t be caching your e-mail, and it’s only likely to ever show pages that have far more traffic than anything you’d be embarrassed to show to others. As far as we can tell, your secret knitting obsession should be safe.

Update: A spokesperson has confirmed that the option to disable Silk’s caching is still available, and that switching it off will cut you out of Trending Now; that’s a very all-or-nothing approach, but it’ll likely suit those put off by the browser’s predictive approach in the first place. Secure pages are still out of the picture as well, which should keep those private Twitter messages ou! t of the equation.

Filed under: ,

Amazon Silk browser on Kindle Fire tracks page visits to generate trends, isn’t as spooky as it sounds (update: opt-out exists) originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 07 Sep 2012 14:33:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceTechCrunch  | Email this | Comments

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday, September 7th, 2012 news No Comments

How The iPad Kicks Kindle’s Butt When It Comes To Ad Traffic (AAPL, AMZN)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/how-the-ipad-kicks-kindles-butt-when-it-comes-to-ad-traffic-2012-2


kindle ipad

Amazon just kicked off a new TV campaign for the Kindle Fire, which it doubtless hopes will further dent sales of Apple’s iPad. But Kindle has a long way to go before it starts threatening the iPad as a device for serving online ads to consumers.

Data from Rimm-Kaufmann Group, an online marketing agency, show that the iPad maintains its total dominance of the tablet market when it comes to ad traffic. Kindle is slowly making progress, but it only has 3.48 percent of the market to iPad’s 88.1 percent.

iPad had a 93.44 percent share of the market late last year, so share is being traded quickly in this category.

With iPad 3 on the way, even those small gains for Kindle may be in jeopardy.

When it comes to ad performance, the iPad also has a significant edge. If you index the data to the average ad displayed on a desktop computer, ads on iPad get 10 percent more revenue per click, the same level of overall clicks, and a greater average order value.

All the other tablets, including Kindle, perform much worse than ads displayed on PCs.

iPad dominates ad traffic on tablets, but its dominance is slipping.

The Kindle is gaining share of ad traffic the fastest against the iPad.

But the iPad is still the most effective tablet device by far, for advertisers.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

Please follow Advertising on Twitter and Facebook.

See Also:



Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Saturday, February 11th, 2012 news No Comments

A Leak From The USA TODAY Shows How The Kindle Fire Is Blowing Away Other Android Tablets (AMZN, APPL)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/a-leak-from-the-usa-today-shows-how-the-kindle-fire-is-blowing-away-other-android-tablets-2012-2


Here’s an interesting look at how the platform wars are playing out across smartphones and tablets.

GeekWire landed an internal slide from USA Today that lists how many times its application has been downloaded. USA Today has a wider, more geographically diverse readership than most other newspapers, giving us insights into the ecosystem that we might not get from the typical measurement companies.

If USA Today’s internal statistics are any indication, the Kindle Fire is blowing other Android tablets out of the water. The slide shows 260,000 downloads of its app for Kindle Fire compared with only 130,000 for other Android tablets. That’s a two-to-one ratio.

The Kindle Fire still trails the iPad by some ~2.6 million downloads, but that’s unsurprising. What’s more impressive is how much headway the Kindle Fire has made in the short time since its release.

Further, you can see that the iPhone app is still beating the Android app in downloads. And Windows Phone has a lot of work to do.

usa-today-kindle-fire

Please follow SAI: Media on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

See Also:



Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday, February 10th, 2012 news No Comments

Groupon’s Growth Bounces Back (GRPN)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-groupons-growth-bounces-back-2012-2

Groupon’s sequential growth had been screeching to a halt, but the company managed to bounce back a little in the fourth quarter. That’s good news. Even better news, which is not shown here, the company  turned an operating profit.

chart of the day, groupon, quarter over quarter growth. feb 9 2012

Please follow SAI on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

See Also:

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, February 9th, 2012 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

Augustine Fou portrait
http://twitter.com/acfou
Send Tips: tips@go-digital.net
Digital Strategy Consulting
Dr. Augustine Fou LinkedIn Bio
Digital Marketing Slideshares
The Grand Unified Theory of Marketing