gaming

‘We’ve made the princely sum of £52′

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/12/07/gaming-company-derides-microsoft-rt-marketplace-/

Gaming company derides Microsoft Store 'We've made the princely sum of 52'

UK gaming outfit Rubicon has castigated Microsoft after claiming a Windows RT port of its Great Big War Game made a meager £52 ($83) in its first week in the store. The company was particularly incensed at Redmond’s lack of promotional features to help the title’s visibility, claiming that “if you’re familiar with (its) new store, this means our app is forever consigned to the garbage bin.” The company added that the iOS, Android “and even RIM” stores have promoted the app, which it said was widely lauded, and felt that after investing £10,000 on the port, “we got spat on” by the software giant. The developer punctuated its blog statement by saying it won’t work with Microsoft again, and “that store is going to look mighty bleak for a long time to come” if it doesn’t change its policy. No doubt there’s some sour grapes getting squeezed here, but it’s fair to say that RT is much in need of some sweeter news.

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Via: Games Industry

Source: Rubicon Blog

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Friday, December 7th, 2012 news No Comments

Analytics Show Facebook Curbs The Reach Of Big Brands’ Posts

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-curbs-the-reach-of-big-brands-2012-11

Billionaire entrepreneur Mark Cuban and “Star Trek” actor George Takei both complained recently that Facebook reduced the “reach” of their posts, limiting the number of fans likely to see any given post.

More seriously, two executives at major social media agencies owned by WPP group claimed the same thing — only with data.

In response, Facebook formally denied that it is “gaming” its Edgerank post algorithm to reduce the reach of posts (and thus force advertisers to pay to promote posts to reach all their fans).

Now comes PageLever, a Facebook analytics company, which gave Mashable some data that shows that the bigger fanbase your Facebook page has, the lower reach any individual post has. Brands with small fanbases of fewer than 10,000 people can get nearly 20 percent of them to see any individual post. But brands like Coca-Cola and Walmart, who have more than 1 million fans, can only get about 6 percent of them to see any given post — unless they pay:

PageLever

The data suggest Facebook’s algorithm discriminates against bigger brands. It encourages smaller brands by offering them triple the reach of their larger competitors. But the more successful a brand becomes on Facebook, the more its organic average reach dwindles.

By the time any company has more than 100,000 fans, of course, they’re pretty dependent on Facebook as a marketing medium — and thus may be more likely to pay to promote posts.

Related: Facebook Denies It Is ‘Gaming’ Its News Feed To Force Companies To Buy Ads

See Also: Facebook Accused Of Changing A Key Algorithm To Hurt Advertisers

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Monday, November 19th, 2012 news No Comments

Analytics Show Facebook Curbs The Reach Of Big Brands’ Posts

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-curbs-the-reach-of-big-brands-2012-11

Billionaire entrepreneur Mark Cuban and “Star Trek” actor George Takei both complained recently that Facebook reduced the “reach” of their posts, limiting the number of fans likely to see any given post.

More seriously, two executives at major social media agencies owned by WPP group claimed the same thing — only with data.

In response, Facebook formally denied that it is “gaming” its Edgerank post algorithm to reduce the reach of posts (and thus force advertisers to pay to promote posts to reach all their fans).

Now comes PageLever, a Facebook analytics company, which gave Mashable some data that shows that the bigger fanbase your Facebook page has, the lower reach any individual post has. Brands with small fanbases of fewer than 10,000 people can get nearly 20 percent of them to see any individual post. But brands like Coca-Cola and Walmart, who have more than 1 million fans, can only get about 6 percent of them to see any given post — unless they pay:

PageLever

The data suggest Facebook’s algorithm discriminates against bigger brands. It encourages smaller brands by offering them triple the reach of their larger competitors. But the more successful a brand becomes on Facebook, the more its organic average reach dwindles.

By the time any company has more than 100,000 fans, of course, they’re pretty dependent on Facebook as a marketing medium — and thus may be more likely to pay to promote posts.

Related: Facebook Denies It Is ‘Gaming’ Its News Feed To Force Companies To Buy Ads

See Also: Facebook Accused Of Changing A Key Algorithm To Hurt Advertisers

Please follow Advertising on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »



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Monday, November 19th, 2012 news No Comments

The App Store Era’s Real Success Story

Source: https://intelligence.businessinsider.com/welcome

Mobile gaming is one of the fastest-growing categories in the sector, led by Apple’s iOS platform and Google’s Android. In particular, social mobile gaming, enabled by always-connected smartphones and the “freemium” revenue model, is particularly strong.

Huge opportunities exist both for small, independent developers and large, established gaming companies. But despite recent momentum, it could be many years before mobile gaming overtakes console gaming in revenue.

The Big Picture

Videogaming is a large and growing industry. Global revenue from videogame software is expected to reach $70 billion worldwide, up from $52 billion in 2011, according to research firm DFC Intelligence. Mobile is expected to contribute 25 percent of that revenue, with PCs generating 39 percent and console-based gaming generating 35 percent.

State Of The Art

Gaming dominates today’s smartphone app economy. In a recent check of Apple’s iPhone App Store, games represented 55 percent of the top 200 paid apps, 33 percent of the top 200 free apps, and 70 percent of the top 200 highest-grossing apps—by far the biggest category. Similarly, in a recent check of Google’s Play store for Android, games represented about 75 percent of the top 200 highest-grossing apps.

iPhone games charts

Of these highest-grossing games, the majority are free, generating revenue through in-app commerce of virtual goods. On the iPhone, for instance, almost 75 percent of the top 140 highest-grossing games were totally f! ree to d ownload, generating all of their revenue through in-app purchases. (Note: Apple does not include advertising revenue and non-iTunes revenue in its calculations.)

The precise amount these apps earn varies by app and by day, but top-10-grossing iPhone apps regularly generate $50,000 to $200,000 in sales per day, a leading app publisher tells us. For more, see the BII report, “How In-App Commerce Drives App Store Success.”

Top-grossing games in each store cover many genres, including collectible virtual cards (Mobage’s Rage of Bahamut), simulations (EA’s The Simpsons: Tapped Out), cards/casino gaming (Poker and Slots by Zynga), social turned-based games (Zynga’s Matching With Friends and Scramble With Friends) and car racing (NaturalMotion’s CSR Racing). Minecraft, a popular computer game, also has top-20 grossing apps in both the iPhone and Android app stores.

Who’s Playing?

One of the driving forces behind mobile gaming is that its audience is broader than hardcore PC or console gaming: It’s attracting a younger and more female audience than traditional gaming, according to a 2011 report from Flurry, a mobile analytics company. That said, the average mobile social gamer also earns over 50 percent more money than the average American, is more than twice as likely to have a college degree, and is more likely to be white or Asian, according to Flurry’s research. The mass-market appeal means mobile gaming has a larger potential audience than PC or console gaming. (More demographic info here from Moco! Space. Also, see this BII chart.)

A Challenge And Opportunity For Incumbents

Mobile gaming has already proven to be a big opportunity for new players like Rovio (of Angry Birds fame) and established gaming firms.

Many of the big videogame firms, including Electronic Arts and Zynga, already have a solid foothold in mobile. But despite a larger potential audience and relative success in the form of multiple hits in the top-grossing lists, mobile still lags in revenue. That’s partially because mobile games cost less, and partially because social games monetize worse on mobile than on the web.

Electronic Arts, for example, generated just 7 percent of its overall revenue from mobile last quarter. But that represented 21 percent year-over-year growth, EA’s second-fastest-growing category after PC gaming. (EA overall declined 4 percent year-over-year. All figures citing GAAP revenue.) Still, the majority of EA’s revenue still comes from Xbox and PlayStation games sold in retail boxes.

EA revenue by type charts

Zynga did not disclose its mobile revenue, but said its mobile footprint increased fivefold year-over-year to 33 million daily active users. Executives admitted that its mobile games monetize poorly relative to web games—generally less than half the r! ate. But they also said that game mix plays a role, adding that one game—Zynga Poker—monetizes as well on mobile as on the web. (“We see no structural reason that mobile can’t monetize as well as the web in the long run.”)

Zynga’s March 2012 purchase of Draw Something and its publisher OMGPOP, however, highlights another trait of the mobile gaming ecosystem: The speed at which a game can become a hit and also lose its momentum. A look at Draw Something’s long-term grossing ranks in the iPhone App Store (via App Annie) and Facebook active user charts suggest Zynga purchased the game/company at the very peak of its popularity.

The question is whether established game publishers will be able to grow mobile revenues fast enough to compensate for declines elsewhere, or if they’ll be leapfrogged by newer, mobile-first and mobile-focused rivals. So far, it’s too early to tell.

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Tuesday, September 4th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

What’s Taking So Long, And Who’s Going To Win?

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/mobile-payments-whats-taking-so-long-and-whos-going-to-win-2012-6

Square Estimated Daily Payment Volume And Revenues

Mobile payments: everyone talks about it, but no one knows exactly how it works or who will win

In our special report, Business Insider Intelligence lays out the four kinds of mobile payment solutions that currently matter:

  • Carrier billing. Where the consumer pays by text message and the charge is added to their phone bill. This is great for a variety of specific use cases (reaching the unbanked, especially teenagers; ecommerce and gaming), but is crimped by carrier fees and control.
  • Near-Field Communications (NFC). Where the consumer can pay at the point of sale by waving his phone in front of a terminal. NFC has been overhyped: it’s not more convenient than cash or credit, and the many companies who want a piece of NFC are canceling each other’s efforts out.
  • Apps. Where the consumer uses an app on his smartphone to pay, typically by scanning a barcode at the register. We believe this is especially useful for specific companies and retailers to offer, as it allows them to offer loyalty rewards and discounts on top of payments.
  • Card readers. Pioneered by startup Square, with recent entries from eBay (PayPal), Intuit, and Verifone, these solutions allow merchants to take payments by plugging a card reader into a smartphone or tablet. They’re very convenient (swiping a credit card is already ingrained consumer behavior) and piggyback on the existing credit card network. Card reader companies can offer value-added services on top of the payments experience to spur adoption by merchants and consumers.

We also:

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Wednesday, June 27th, 2012 news No Comments

Friendster reborn as a gaming site, wishes Facebook cared

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/04/26/friendster-reborn-as-a-gaming-site-wishes-facebook-cared/

Image

Friendster’s as good as dead to the western world (it hasn’t really crossed our radar since 2005), but Forbes reports that the site is still huge in Southeast Asia — though not for the reasons you might think. It was the original social network when in launched in 2002, but its acquisition by e-payment provider MOL Global in 2009 led to its reincarnation as a top online gaming destination for countries such as India, Indonesia and Malaysia. The new Friendster just officially emerged from beta as a game-centric site, and the remaining vestiges of its social networking past — you can still add friends, after all — are gamified with reward points. Moreover, owner MOL Global has added e-payments to the mix, letting users buy Friendster Coins to purchase virtual goods. Given predictions that the Asian gaming community will exceed 1 billion by 2016, the site’s future is looking rosier than ever. That might lessen the sting of being plum blown out of the social networking game by the big dogs.

Friendster reborn as a gaming site, wishes Facebook cared originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 26 Apr 2012 02:39:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink www.forb es.com/sites/limyunghui/2012/04/25/friendster-is-the-largest-online-gaming-platform-in-southeast-asia/”>Forbes  |   | Email this | Comments

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Thursday, April 26th, 2012 news No Comments

Nielsen report finds 56 percent of US households have a modern game console, total gaming time up seven percent

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/03/09/nielsen-report-finds-56-percent-of-us-households-have-a-modern-g/

Nielsen is out with its annual survey of video game use in the US today, and it’s found that gaming continues to be on the rise across the board. That includes a seven percent increase in total gaming time compared to the previous year (apparently due largely to increases in mobile and tablet gaming), and an increase in modern console ownership from 50 percent of households to 56 percent; that includes so-called 7th generation consoles like the Wii, Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3. It also found the number of cross-platform gamers be on the upswing, with 24 percent responding that they play on two or more of a console, PC, tablet or mobile device (compared to 17 percent previously) Looking at mobile gaming, specifically, Nieslen found that while iOS gaming tended to be distributed fairly evenly across all age groups, Android gaming proved to be far more popular among those aged 25-34 than any other group.

A few other tidbits: 65 percent of consoles are located in the living room, online shopping for games is up while other channels continue to decline, and streaming video continues to be a growing secondary use for game consoles (particularly on the Wii, where it accounts for 33 percent of console usage, compared to roughly 15 percent on both the Xbox 360 and PS3).

Nielsen report finds 56 percent of US households have a modern game console, total gaming time up seven percent originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:40:00 EDT. Please see our term! s for us e of feeds.

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Saturday, March 10th, 2012 news No Comments

Social Gaming Revenue Will Blow Past $5 Billion By 2015

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/social-gaming-revenue-will-blow-past-5-billion-by-2015-2012-2


In our report on social gaming out today, we forecast that the U.S. social gaming market, including smartphones, will more than double and blow past $5 billion by 2015.

We think this will happen because social games will break into the mainstream as new types of games reach new audiences, and because companies will get even better at monetizing.

Our report also includes an in-depth look at industry trends and exclusive interviews with top industry executives. Click here to read it → 

Social Gaming Revenue

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Tuesday, February 21st, 2012 news No Comments

Gamers spending more time streaming video to their consoles, Nielsen finds

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2011/12/16/gamers-spending-more-time-streaming-video-to-their-consoles-nie/

Nielsen, the purveyor of all things statistical and demographic, published a new study this week on game console usage within the US. According to the report, released on Wednesday, gamers this year spent notably more time streaming video to their consoles than they did in 2010, due in large part to the growing availability of services like Netflix, Hulu, MLB Network and ESPN3. Xbox 360 users spent 14 percent of their console time streaming video this year (compared with ten percent last year), PlayStation 3 owners devoted 15 percent (nine percent in 2010), and Nintendo Wii users spent a whopping 33 percent — a 13 percent increase over last year’s study. Each console, moreover, seems to appeal to different functions. Xbox 360 users, for example, devoted 34 percent of their time to online gaming, Wii owners spent 55 percent of their console time on offline gaming, and the PS3 was the device of choice for DVD and Blu-Ray viewing, comprising 22 percent of usage. Overall, Nielsen found that usage increased by seven percent over the last year across all three platforms, which suggests that streaming may be keeping us glued to our consoles for even longer. Read more at the source link below.

Gamers spending more time streaming video to their consoles, Nielsen finds originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 16 Dec 2011 06:33:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Friday, December 16th, 2011 news No Comments

Google Quietly Invests Over $100 Million in Zynga, Readying Google Games

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5584118/google-quietly-invests-over-100-million-in-zynga-readying-google-games

Google Quietly Invests Over 0 Million in Zynga, Readying Google GamesWhoa. TechCrunch reports that Google has invested between $100 and $200 million in Zynga, the social gaming behemoth behind Farmville, Mafia Wars, and others, in preparation for the launch of Google Games later this year.

TechCrunch’s “multiple sources” say that Google itself, not its venture capital division Google Ventures, has invested between $100 and $200 million in Zynga, a huge power play presumably with the aim of eroding Facebook’s social media dominance.

It seems that Google sees Zynga as the best way to hit the ground running with Google Games, a social gaming service from the search company that’s set to launch later this year. TechCrunch points to this job opening for “Product Management Leader, Games” at their Mountain View campus as proof that we’ll be seeing a lot more about Google’s move into gaming in the near future.

With Google Me, the company’s purported Facebook killer, continuing to take shape, this major investment in Zynga is just further proof that Google is making a very serious effort to hit Facebook where it hurt, namely, the farms. [TechCrunch]

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Monday, July 12th, 2010 news No Comments

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