gigs

This Startup Lets You ‘Date’ Prospective New Employers Anonymously For $1000+ A Week

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/group-talent-try-a-job-before-you-buy-2013-7

For most of us, a job offer is an all or nothing thing. You do a few interviews and the company either offers you the job or not. You accept it, forsaking all others, or you don’t.

But a startup called GroupTalent that finds jobs for programmers (Android, Python, Ruby developers to be precise), is turning that on its head.

Its recruitment platform supports something called a “try out” period that lets employers and employees work together for a few days, or maybe a couple of weeks, on a freelance basis for an ample weekly salary. $1,000 – $3,000 a week is typical, though GroupTalent says some folks can make as much as $7,000 a week.

The programmer is hired by a company to jump in and build something useful. If it’s a fit, the two can then get permanently hitched. This is a little different than a typical freelance gig, because these companies are looking for a long-term relationship, not just a series of short-term gigs.

And here’s the best part: GroupTalent will hide your Try It from your current employer. If it’s not a fit, there’s no harm done. “By telling us who your current employer is, we can make sure they don’t see your profile,” the company promises.

The company operates in New York and San Francisco so far, and currently hosts almost 600 jobs. It has plans to add jobs in Seattle, Boston, Austin, San Diego and Los Angeles, it says.

Today the GroupTalent website added some new improved search features, too, so it’s easier to browse the freelance jobs to see if something sparks your interest.

GroupTalent is a TechStars startup that’s raised about $1 million so far. It’s cofounder and CEO, Manuel Medina, cut his teeth at Microsoft wooing developers into writing apps for Microsoft Game Studios. He also helped convince developers to write apps for Windows Phone. Cofounder Gordon Hempton is also an ex-Microsoft developer. He worked on Microsoft’s SQL Server.

 

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Tuesday, July 9th, 2013 news No Comments

Can Android Make Wi-Fi Useful On a Camera? [Android]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5936784/nikon-coolpix-s800c-can-android-make-wi+fi-useful-on-a-camera

Nikon Coolpix S800c: Can Android Make Wi-Fi Useful On a Camera?It makes sense that Nikon’s trotting out a Wi-Fi connected camera just like everybody else. For the people who replaced a real camera with a smartphone camera, taking pictures and posting them online are one and the same activity. But the Coolpix S800c runs Android 2.3 and has 4 gigs of storage for apps. That’s weird! Is Nikon genius for adopting an open OS standard? Or are we so desperate for Wi-Fi that we’ve resorted to Android to get our cameras online?

Without Android and Wi-Fi, the Coolpix S800c is about as boring of a point-and-shoot as any: It has a 16-megapixel, backside-illuminated CMOS sensor, a 10x optical zoom, built-in GPS, touchscreen controls, and it shoots 1080p video all for $350. Give or take a spec, dimension, or a couple of bucks, and it could easily be its Wi-Fi brethren like the Samsung MV900F or the Canon 530HS.

Except for one important difference: the connected features on those Wi-Fi cameras are so poorly designed that they’re virtually unusable. And while there’s some hints things might be getting better the problem hasn’t changed. As of right now, Sony, Panasonic, Samsung, and Canon all have their own Wi-Fi interfaces that connect to an assortment of proprietary smartphone apps and cloud storage systems. We’ve used the cheapest and the priciest, and so far we’ve yet to be impressed. If these cameras are meant to have Wi-Fi, why can’t it be easier? It’s enough to make you wish you’d just plugged your camera into your computer to get the photos off.

Nikon Coolpix S800c: Can Android Make Wi-Fi Useful On a Camera?

You can say whatever you want about the outmoded Android 2.3 OS, but at the very least it works. The interface is immediately understandable to anyone who has ever used a smartphone. Maybe more importantly, by putting Android on the camera, you can suddenly load the camera up with photo-specific Android apps. Finally, Instagram on your camera. Wait, is that cheating? And hey, maybe developers will get creative and develop something new with connected cameras in mind.

Still, Android on a camera doesn’t solve every problem, and in a way it’s more reflective of existing failures than anything. Android doesn’t suddenly make your camera a phone, and you still need an Internet connection to post photos online.

In the end maybe what we really need is a seamless way to dump photos onto a phone—what you do from there is up to you. In fact in testing Wi-Fi cameras across the board that seems to be the only feature everyone can agree on. Now it’s just a question of nailing it down. We’ll reserve judgement on the latest crop of Wi-Fi cams—including this bizarre Android thing—until they’re available this fall. [Nikon USA]

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Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012 news No Comments

‘App Economy’ has created 500,000 jobs since 2007

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/02/08/study-app-economy-has-created-500-000-jobs-since-2007/

It’s no secret that the rise of smartphones, tablets and social networking has fostered an entirely new market for app developers, but a freshly released study has now attempted to quantify this impact, in terms of real jobs. According to TechNet, a bipartisan network of tech execs, the so-called “App Economy” has created an estimated 466,000 jobs since 2007, when the iPhone was first unveiled. The report specifies that this estimate includes all jobs at Facebook-focused companies like Zynga, as well as dev gigs at Amazon, AT&T and Electronic Arts, in addition to the obvious heavyweights, Apple and Google. As far as geography goes, California leads the way as the most app-friendly state, though New York City tops the list of metropolitan areas. It’s not an entirely bi-coastal affair, though, with some two-thirds of all app-related jobs located outside of California and New York. TechNet acknowledges that the App Economy “is only four years old and extremely fluid,” so it’s likely that these numbers will fluctuate in the years to come, though the organization says these numbers underscore a fundamental principle: “Innovation creates jobs, and in this case, lots of them.” Read the full report at the source link below.

Study: ‘App Economy’ has created 500,000 jobs since 2007 originally appeared on Engadge! t on Wed, 08 Feb 2012 08:32:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Wednesday, February 8th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

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