Guardian

Glenn Greenwald’s Article On NSA Snooping Actually Snooped On Everyone Who Clicked

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/glenn-greenwald-snooped-on-everyone-2013-8

Glenn Greenwald

An article by The Guardian’s Glenn Greenwald on XKEYSCORE actually gathered the browsing habits of everyone who clicked and wasn’t protected (by private, encrypted, and/or proxy browsing), reports Bob Cesca of the Daily Banter.

Using a free web application called Ghostery — which tells the user about embedded trackers —  Cesca found that The Guardian embedded 27 tracking bugs inside Greenwald’s article.

The bugs track browsing metadata, a lot like what Greenwald exposed on June 6 with his article on the National Security Agency and Verizon.

Ostensibly, private companies track browsing metadata on the web in order to help advertise and market products to users online.

(Though Nokia showed last year that there’s a thin, spooky line between advertising and surveillance — something alumni of Israel’s Unit 8200 also know all too well.)

Which begs the question: Why is it OK for private companies to snoop in the name of capitalism, but not for the government to do so in the name of security?

 

, Metro, Guardian

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Tuesday, January 15th, 2013 news No Comments

Creepy – Dynamically Targeting Display Ads Based on Items and Pages Viewed

The 3 business projectors I viewed yesterday on NewEgg.com and the one I added to my shopping cart to check the “special” price now appear in a display ad on news site The Guardian.

Where’s “the line?”  When will consumers rise up and say enough is enough and stop allowing advertisers to buy and sell their personal information without their permission for the sake of “targeting” them with more ads.

See also – The Power of Social Media: The Voice of the Consumer Expressed Rapidly and Vigorously Through Social Media. 

 

targeting based on products viewed

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Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012 display advertising, trends No Comments

Read Anonymous Reviews like Graffiti

Source: http://lifehacker.com/5886582/read-anonymous-reviews-like-graffiti

Read Anonymous Reviews Like GraffitiTrolls. They fill the internet with insults, dead-end arguments, and inanity the likes of which we’ve never seen. Or maybe we have. The Guardian’s David Mitchell notes that trolling comments aren’t all that different from graffiti, and should likewise carry no more weight.

More specifically, Mitchell is talking less about trolls as you and I know them and more about anonymous, often inaccurate online reviews. It’s not a bulletproof analogy by any means, but Mitchell’s idea does reframe the way you look at anonymous content in a compelling way:

When you read a bit of graffiti that says something like “Blair is a liar”, you don’t take it as fact. You may, independently, have concluded that it is fact. But you don’t think that the graffiti has provided that information. It is merely evidence that someone, when in possession of a spray can, wished to assert their belief in the millionaire former premier’s mendacity. It is unsubstantiated, anonymous opinion. We understand that instinctively. We need to start routinely applying those instincts to the web.

If you read a review, an opinion, a description or a fact and you don’t know who wrote it then it’s no more reliable than if it were sprayed on a railway bridge. We should always assume the worst so that all those who wish to convince… have an incentive to identify themselves.

The flip side of the coin, of course, is that anonymity is vital to the spread of information on the internet. The important tool to remember, as always, is your skepticism. Without it, you’re letting yourself get all worked up over graffiti. (And we’re not talking Banksy here—or even Hanksy.) Photo remixed from The Awl.

An internet troll’s opinion should carry no more weight than graffiti | The Guardian

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Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012 digital strategy No Comments

British Teenagers Would Rather Lose TV Than The Internet

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/british-teenagers-would-rather-lose-tv-than-the-internet-2011-10


3D TV

Young British teenagers would rather lose access to a TV than access to the Internet or their cell phones, reports the Guardian.

According to new research carried out by British communications regulator, Ofcom, 18 percent of 12 to 15-year-olds said they would miss TV the most if all media was taken away. That compares to 28 percent who said they would miss their cell phones and 25 percent who said they would miss the Internet.

A year ago, TV was missed as much as the Internet.

However, according to Digital Spy, the study also showed that young teenagers are watching more TV than ever. Viewing figures have increased by almost two hours a week since 2007, and “catch-up” services online are increasingly being used.

Please follow Europe on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

See Also:




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Tuesday, October 25th, 2011 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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