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How Mobile Is Waging Battle For The Multi-Screen Living Room

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/bii-report-how-mobile-is-waging-battle-for-multi-screen-living-room-2012-12

fFor over a decade, big tech companies, including IBM, Apple, and Microsoft, have been promising to take over the living room.

But home entertainment has proved a hard business to crack, and consumers remain tied to their TVs and panoply of set-top devices.

In a new report from BI Intelligence, we examine the distinct scenarios via which mobile devices will wage their battle for the living room, analyze what happens when screens collide and how the new multi-screen living room will actually function, and detail the opportunities being presented to mobile developers, advertisers, and device manufacturers. 

Access the Full Report By Signing Up For A Free Trial Today >>>

Here’s an outline of how mobile devices are waging the battle for the living room:

In full, the special report:

For full access to the report on How Mobile Is Waging A Battle On The Living Room sign up for a free trial subscription today.



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Tuesday, December 4th, 2012 news No Comments

$1,450 for high-res, high framerate home viewing

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/11/30/redray-4k-cinema-player-1-450-pre-order/

Redray 4K Cinema Player is ready to preorder, $1,450 for highres, framerate at home

We got a peek at Red’s Redray 4K Cinema Player and Projector back in April at NAB, but now you can bring the player portion of it to your own home very soon. You’ll need to bring your own 4K Ultra HD display but for $1,450 you can pre-order a unit capable of native 4,096 × 2,160 or 3,840 x 2,160 video playback (in .RED file format) and upscaling. It connects to 4K displays via one HDMI 1.4 port or 4 HDMI 1.3 ports, with an additional HDMI jack needed to push 7.1 audio. It’s even ready for the new high framerate 3D video that we’ll see debut at theaters next week with The Hobbit. There’s no mention of the Red Laser Projector yet, so you’ll have to BYO 4K display, which right now would probably mean something by LG or Sony.

To get content home Red is also launching its nationwide fiber-based Odemax.com over-the-top distribution network. Red co-owner Jarred Land calls it the “only comprehensive distribution solution for 4K,” with built-in DRM, sales and analytics tools. He goes on to say that the Redray player will begin shipping at the end of December, with volume shipping promised in Q1 2013. A new RRencoder plugin for the Redcine-X viewer will launch in mid-December for converting external footage to the .RED format, and finally Odemax is scheduled to come online in January in time for the Sundance film f! estival. Check for more details after the break, plus a few more pics and a press release with all the specs.

Gallery: Red Redray Cinema Player, Odemax.com 4K info

Continue reading Redray 4K Cinema Player is ready to pre-order: $1,450 for high-res, high framerate home viewing

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Source: Red Store, Red, Odemax.com

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Saturday, December 1st, 2012 news No Comments

How China’s Web Censorship Is Driving Traffic to a Miami Pet Spa Website

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5964199/how-chinas-web-censorship-is-driving-traffic-to-a-miami-pet-spa-website

How China's Web Censorship Is Driving Traffic to a Miami Pet Spa WebsiteChina’s well-known for its long and illustrious history of censoring the web. But rather than just blocking sites, it’s employing some rather strange techniques—which means the online home of a small pet spa in Miami is receiving an insane number of hits every day.

New Scientist has taken a peek inside the sinister world of Chinese web censoring, and it makes for fascinating reading. Richard Fisher explains that, far from simply blocking websites, Chinese authorities are employing all kinds of techniques to prevent their population from seeing the real web.

Often that involves subtle tricks, like giving the appearance of a slow internet connection. But sometimes the country uses DNS poisoning, which uses cheeky redirection to throw up a website that wasn’t requested. In particular, a Miami pet spa, known as The Pet Club, is one of the chosen sites. New Scientist explains:

[W]hen people in China try to access torproject.org – a tool that prevents online tracking – they instead often get the IP address of thepetclubfl.net

No one knows why the censors picked The Pet Club’s website. Until now, Dennis Bost of Universal Merchant Solutions in Hollywood, Florida, who set up the website for the salon owners, had been puzzled by the web traffic he’d been seeing. “I’m amazed at the number of hits they get from China,” he says. “They’re a grooming salon. No one is popping over from Beijing to have their Shar Pei groomed.”

Sounds likes a good idea, if you’re a Chinese official hell-bent on censoring the web without generating too much suspicion. Or at least, it used to seem like a good idea: let’s hope, for the sake of China’s online community, that Gizmodo and New Scientist aren’t routed to The Pet Club, too. [New Scientist]

Image by Shutterstock / Andersphoto

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Thursday, November 29th, 2012 news No Comments

Soon You’ll Be Able To Buy Wine Over Facebook

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-wine-gifts-with-robert-mondavi-winery-and-chandon-2012-11

girl drinking wine

How did we miss this small print during Facebook’s recent launch of Facebook Gifts? “Soon, you’ll also be able to send wine from Robert Mondavi Winery and Chandon,” the company said on its blog.

(Gifts is a new function in which, when someone has a birthday, users can click on a little gift icon and send them something nice.)

In fact, you can already send someone a Mr. Beer home brew kit from Facebook Gifts.

But it appears that booze of all kinds will soon begin flowing regularly within Facebook. It’s the perfect medium given that age verification — a constant bugbear for alcohol marketers — is already taken care of.

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Monday, November 19th, 2012 news No Comments

Where Microsoft’s Profits Come From (MSFT)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-microsoft-income-by-segment-2012-10

When Microsoft revealed its first ever computer, the Surface, CEO Steve Ballmer said, “Windows is the heart and soul of Microsoft from Windows PCs to Windows Servers to Windows Phones and Windows Azure.”

And while that’s certainly accurate, the Windows division was not the company’s heart and soul as far as profits go, last quarter. The company made twice as much money last quarter from the Business Division, which is home to Office. And Microsoft’s Server and Tools group had bigger profits than the Windows division.

The reason Windows profits were light is that Microsoft is in a transition from Windows 7 to Windows 8. Windows operating profit should pick back up once Windows 8 sales pick up this quarter into next year.

chart of the day, microsoft income by segment, oct 2012

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Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/vip/~3/kxnvLJen2SQ/best-buy-to-price+match-the-internet

Best Buy to Price-Match the InternetThe Wall Street Journal is reporting that Best Buy plans to match the price of internet retailers like Amazon over the holidays this year, as well as offering free home delivery when stores are out of stock.

According to a good ol’ “person familiar with the matter”, the electronics chain is assuming the strategy over the holiday season to draw customers away from shopping purely online. That’s something that will appeal to many consumers—especially those who prefer a traditional shopping experience.

It does, however, seem to contradict comments made by Best Buy’s new CEO Hubert Joly. He recently claimed that the prevalence of “showrooming”—where consumers head into shops to check out goods before ultimately buying online—has been blown out of proportion.

Maybe that contradiction is just reflective of the conundrum all big-box retailers face: they need to keep up with online retailers, but they don’t want to lose sight of what once made them successful. That’s a tough call.

Either way, price matching would inevitably draw in more custom. Would you buy something at Best Buy instead of ordering online, all prices being equal? [WSJ]

Image by Lynn Watson / Shutterstock.com

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Friday, October 12th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Google Maps Street View Now Works On The iPhone (GOOG, AAPL)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/street-view-on-iphone-2012-10

google maps street view iphone 5

Google announced today it updated the mobile web version of Google Maps app to include the popular Street View feature.

That means you can now access Street View on your iPhone by opening Google Maps in the Safari browser. Just head to maps.google.com, enter an address, and tap the “pegman” icon to enter Street View.

Since Google Maps is no longer baked into Apple’s Maps app for iPhones and iPads, using the web-based version is your best option. Google is said to be working on a standalone Google Maps app for the iPhone, but it probably won’t be ready for a few months.

In the meantime, you can learn how to add the Google Maps website to your iPhone’s home screen here >

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Thursday, October 4th, 2012 news No Comments

When People Use Mobile Devices (AAPL, GOOG, MSFT)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-mobile-and-pc-content-2012-9

Ad company Kontera tracked data from 15,000 publishers to find out when people are using their PC versus iPhones, Android phones, and tablets, which are lumped as “mobile” in the chart below.

This chart shows for each hour of the day what percentage of total mobile and PC content is consumed. As you can see, mobile usage is strongest from 6 PM to midnight. PC usage is strongest from 11 AM to 5 PM.

What this tells us is that people are using PCs at work, and mobile gadgets at home. Sort of a duh, right? Maybe, but it suggests a big shift in what “personal computing” really means. If we’re doing mobile computing largely during our personal time, which is when we’re out of work, it means people are more likely to buy tablets than traditional PCs in the future.

chart of the day, mobile and pc content consumption, september 2012

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Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5948312/how-makers-are-desktop-fabricating-a-digital-revolution-of-things

How Makers Are Desktop-Fabricating a Revolution of ThingsWhen I was in high school in the late 1970’s, we had workshop class as part of the “Industrial Arts” curriculum. It wasn’t quite clear why this was a required credit—we lived in suburb of Washington, D.C., and there were no factories around and most of my friends’ parents were lawyers and government workers. But learning how to use workshop tools—band saws, table saws, drill presses, and the like—was just part of a mid-twentieth-century American education. The bad kids made ninja throwing stars; the worst made bongs. I made a crude magazine stand that my parents tolerated until I left home; I was lucky to have kept all my fingers through the process. Meanwhile, girls were steered to “Home Economics” to learn about sewing, cooking, and painting, which was, in a sense, another form of required crafting and DIY education.

At home, I made Heathkit electronics kits, which involved soldering irons and weeks of painstaking work with wires and components but were the cheapest way to obtain something like a citizen’s band radio or a stereo amplifier. Chemistry kits had actual chemicals in them (as opposed to little more than baking soda and a ream of legalist warnings, as is now sadly the case), and were great fun. Anybody with a cool or temperamental car spent the weekend under the hood with a wrench, hopping it up and otherwise tinkering with its mechanics. “Taking things apart to see how they work” was just what kids did, and finding users for the parts launched countless fantastic machines, some of which actually worked.

How Makers Are Desktop-Fabricating a Revolution of ThingsBut starting in the 1980s and 1990s, the romance of making things with your own hands started to fade. First manufacturing jobs were no longer a safe way to enter and stay in the middle class, and the workshop lost even its vocational appeal as the number of manufacturing workers in the employment rolls shrank. In its place came keyboards and screens. PCs were introduced, and all the good jobs used them; the school curriculum shifted to train kids to become “symbolic analysts,” to use the social-science phrase for white-collar information work. Computer class replaced shop class. School budget cuts in the 1990s were the nail in the coffin; once the generation of workshop teachers retired, they were rarely replaced; the tools were sold or put in storage.

Imported Asian electronics became better and cheaper than Heathkit gear, and the shift from individual electronic components like resistors and transistors and capacitors to inscrutable microchips and integrated circuits made soldering skills pointless. Electronics became disposable boxes with “no user serviceable parts inside,” as the warning labels put it. Heathkit left the kit business in 1992.

Cars evolved from carburetors and distributor caps that you could fiddle with to rule injection and electronic ignition that you couldn’t. Chips replaced mechanical parts. The new cars didn’t need as much maintenance, and even if you wanted to go under the hood there wasn’t much you could fix or modify, other than to change the oil and the oil filter. The working parts were hermetically sealed and locked down, a price we happily paid for reliability and minimal upkeep.

Just as shop class disappeared with school budget cuts, better opportunities in the workplace for women and gender equality killed Home Economics. Kids grew up with computer and video games, not wrenches and band saws. The best minds of a generation were seduced by software and the infinite worlds to be created online, and they made the digital age we all live in today. That is how the world shifted from atoms to bits. The transformation has gone on for thirty years, a generation, and it’s hard to argue with any of it.

But now, thirty years after “Industrial Arts” left the curriculum and large chunks of our manufacturing sectors have shifted overseas, there’s finally a reason to get your hands dirty again. As desktop fabrication tools go mainstream, it’s time to return “making things” to the high school curriculum, not as the shop class of old, but in the form of teaching design.

Today, schoolchildren learn how to use PowerPoint and Excel as part of their computer class, and they still learn to draw and sculpt in art class. But think how much better it would be if they could choose a third option: design class. Imagine a course where kids would learn to use free 3D CAD tools such as Sketchup or Autodesk 123D. Some would design buildings and fantastic structures, much as they sketch in their notebooks already. Others would create elaborate video game levels with landscapes and vehicles. And yet others would invent machines. Even better, imagine if each design classroom had a few 3D printers or a laser cutter. All those desktop design tools have a “Make” menu item. Kids could actually fabricate what they have drawn onscreen. Just consider what it would mean to them to hold something they dreamed up. This is how a generation of Makers will be created. This is how the next wave of manufacturing entrepreneurs will be born.

From the book: MAKERS: The New Industrial Revolution by Chris Anderson. Copyright 2012 by Chris Anderson. Published by arrangement with Crown Business, a division of Random House,

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Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Here Are The Apps Tim Cook Suggests You Use Instead Of Apple Maps (AAPL)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/tim-cook-suggests-alternative-map-apps-2012-9

google maps iphone widget

Tim Cook released a letter to Apple customers today, apologizing for failing to deliver on its new mapping application for iPhones and iPads.

Cook promises the app will get better, but suggests users try a few alternative apps in the meantime.

Here are the apps he suggests you use instead of Apple Maps:

For the mobile Web version of Google Maps and Nokia Maps, you’ll need to create a shortcut to the sites on your iPhone’s home screen by bookmarking them. We show you how to do that here for Google and here for Nokia.

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Friday, September 28th, 2012 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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