Larry Page

Mobile Is Starting To Drive Global Internet Penetration

Source: https://intelligence.businessinsider.com/welcome

The PC has long been associated with bringing the Internet to new audiences, but that perception is changing. These days, the world’s unconnected billions are being introduced to the Web on their mobile screens.

According to the International Telecommunications Union, there were 1.6 billion mobile Internet users at year-end 2012, up from 1.2 billion a year prior.

The mobile Internet is scaling incredibly fast. It took the desktop-based Web 18 years to reach 1.6 billion users.

The ITU forecasts there will be 2.1 billion mobile Internet users in 2013, or 71% of the total global Internet population.

Since mobile phones are one of the most widely deployed technologies in history, it makes sense that mobile will start driving global Internet penetration, which currently stands at 36%.

In some countries this is already happening. In China, for example, there are now more mobile Internet than broadband users.

As Google CEO Larry Page argued on the Charlie Rose Show, mobile phones connected to the Internet are going to be “most people’s first computer.”

Click here to download chart and data in Excel.

Mobile Internet Users

Here’s a look at total Internet penetration:

Global Internet Penetration

 

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Friday, July 5th, 2013 news No Comments

The Reason Larry Page Doesn’t Want Googlers Thinking About The Competition Is Pretty Inspiring (GOOG)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-reason-larry-page-doesnt-want-googlers-thinking-about-the-competition-is-pretty-inspiring-2012-12

larry page

During an interview with Fortune’s Miguel Helft, Google CEO Larry Page is transparently reluctant to talk about who he thinks is Google’s competition.

Helft asks him: “Is it Siri? Is it Amazon or commercial queries?”

Page tries to dodge the question, saying: “I don’t really think about it that way.”

Helf presses: “Because you don’t think about competition?”

And then Page drops this doozy, which is pretty inspirational for people in the tech industry:

“Obviously we think about competition to some extent.”

“But I feel my job is mostly getting people not to think about our competition. In general I think there’s a tendency for people to think about the things that exist. Our job is to think of the thing you haven’t thought of yet that you really need. And by definition, if our competitors knew that thing, they wouldn’t tell it to us or anybody else. I think just our strengths, our weaknesses, our opportunities are different than any other company.”

(Of course the truth is that lots of Googlers do think about the competition, and when they do, it’s mostly about Amazon lately. The reason: Google makes its money from commercial web searches, and increasingly people are just going straight to Amazon.com for that.)

SEE ALSO: 12 Quotes That Reveal How Larry Page Built Google Into The World’s Most Important Internet Company

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Tuesday, December 11th, 2012 news No Comments

Google’s Stock Has Done Surprisingly Well Under Larry Page (GOOG)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-google-stock-under-larry-page-2012-8

While we spend much of our time focused on Apple’s incredible stock run, Google has also been experiencing a nice little run of its own lately.

Under Larry Page the stock is up 15%, which is somewhat surprising because Page is not exactly favorable to Wall Street, or investors.

In fact, Page’s actions as CEO have been somewhat hostile to investors. He split Google’s stock giving himself even more power. Google is releasing all sorts of new, weird products like Google Glass, and self-driving cars. Investors tend to frown on these odd ball products.

So, what’s working for Google? Well, it’s not Facebook. And it’s pretty evident Facebook’s ad sales aren’t coming at the expense of Google’s. Perhaps that’s helping propel the stock forward.

chart of the day, google stock under larry page, august 2012

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Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012 news No Comments

Facebook’s Mobile Future Looks Bleak

Source: https://intelligence.businessinsider.com/welcome

Facebook Mobile-Only

In a new SEC filing, Facebook noted that 102 million users only accessed the site through a mobile device last quarter, as first reported by TechCrunch.

That’s up from from 83 million users in the first quarter, a 23 percent increase. There are no statistics from prior quarters, unfortunately, but it’s reasonable to think that the number has been growing at a similar rate from a small base. 

Facebook added 54 million new monthly active users last quarter. It appears that 35 percent of those users are mobile-only.

This trend will only accelerate over the next few years. As Google CEO Larry Page recently argued on the Charlie Rose Show, mobile phones connected to the Internet are going to be “most people’s first computer.” This is especially true in the developing world, where mobile offers a compelling solution to affordable internet access.

facebook arpuThis does not mean that Facebook’s revenues “could plummet” if they don’t figure out how to ramp up mobile advertising, as TechCrunch argues, but it hurts its ability to generate that massive revenue bump that everyone has assumed is just around the corner.

As we discussed last week, Facebook is currently generating mobile ad revenue at a $180 million annual run rate from the mobile version of its Sponsored Stories product, which injects advertiser-selected posts into users’ news feeds. That number represents only 33 cents per mobile monthly active user per year (or ~8 cents per quarter), which is leagues below its current average revenue per user, or ARPU. It will undoubtedly rise as deployment increases or Facebook can demonstrate their value.

While there has been some positive evidence of Facebook’s mobile ads’ effectiveness, it hasn’t proven they are a silver bullet either.  But if the developing world comes online increasingly mobile-only, it will hinder the company’s ability to maximize revenue out of its newest users. 

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Wednesday, August 1st, 2012 news No Comments

Digg Almost Sold For $200 Million In 2008

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/digg-sale-rumors-google-2012-7

Kevin Rose Digg cover edit

Betaworks, a New York-based startup incubator, just bought the assets of San Francisco-based social news-sharing site Digg for $500,000.

That’s embarrassing, considering how close its investors got to scoring a deal for 400 times that amount.

In 2008, TechCrunch’s Michael Arrington reported that Google was in “final negotiations” to buy Digg for $200 million. Neither company ever commented publicly on the talks, but we heard on our own that the talks were very real.

Google cofounder Larry Page and Digg CEO Jay Adelson were all smiles at the Allen & Co. media conference four years ago.

Here’s how, according to one source, the talks advanced so far only to come to a screaming halt.

Google has long been ruled by its engineers. Marissa Mayer, then in charge of Google’s consumer search products, championed a purchase of Digg as a way to improve the quality of Google News by using Digg’s voting mechanisms as social signals.

The deal ran aground after Googlers started interviewing Digg engineers. Googlers—who are kind of snobby when it comes to judging other coders—didn’t find them up to Mountain View standards. Google could build a Digg in-house. And just like that, the deal was off.

Google went on to launch Buzz, a now-forgotten service that was something of a cross between Twitter and Digg. And it eventually hired Digg cofounder Kevin Rose after his mobile-app incubator, Milk, failed to make a splash.

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Thursday, July 12th, 2012 news No Comments

Google Is In Total Denial About Its Huge Problem With Google+ (GOOG)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/google-plus-rj-metrics-engagement-2012-5

Larry Page looking down

When is Google going to admit the obvious?

Google+, the “social spine” of CEO Larry Page’s counterattack on Facebook, is a flop.

That’s according to a detailed analysis of user activity by research firm RJ Metrics for Fast Company.

RJ Metrics selected 40,000 Google+ users at random. It then analyzed their public posts.

What they found is that a lot of people start sharing on Google+, then stop. 3 out of 10 made a single public post, then never posted again. Even among people who made five posts, 15 percent had stopped posting.

RJ Metrics said this “decay rate” was disturbing.

Other analysts have found that people spend an average of 3 minutes a month on Google+, versus 7 hours on Facebook.

Now, it’s possible that many Google+ users are not posting publicly and are sharing privately instead, as Google+ allows. That’s Google’s timeworn excuse when asked about Google+ engagement. But Google has refused to give clear statistics about activity on Google+.

“Google is just refusing to answer the question for its own reasons, which is probably because Google+ has far less activity as a standalone social network than either Facebook or Twitter,” wrote Google expert Danny Sullivan recently.

Go see the gory details on Fast Company >>

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Thursday, May 17th, 2012 news No Comments

Google Is Getting Ready To Take On Amazon…In Shipping? (GOOG, AMZN)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/google-is-getting-ready-to-take-on-amazon-in-shipping-2011-12


shippingboxes.jpg

Google is talking to major retailers like Macy’s, the Gap, and OfficeMax to offer customers one-day shipping when they buy products after finding them through Google searches.

It sounds a lot like Amazon Prime, Amazon’s $79-per-year service that offers fast shipping and other benefits.

The Wall Street Journal first reported the service, and confirmed that Macy’s had been approached by Google to participate.

The next-day shipping will apparently be combined with Google Product Search, which today lets users find products and compare them across different e-commerce sites to get the lowest price. When people buy a product from one of the sites after finding it on Google Product Search, they’ll get an offer for one day shipping for a low fee, the Journal says.

Google won’t be running an e-commerce site or stocking products in warehouses like Amazon does, but will instead create a system that figures out which retail partner’s stores are nearest to a customer and have the product in stock. Then it would team up with UPS and local couriers for delivery.

Still, e-commerce fulfillment is a pretty big step removed from Google’s core mission of organizing the world’s information. Lack of focus has been a problem for the company, and CEO Larry Page has killed a lot of non-core products this year

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Thursday, December 1st, 2011 news No Comments

Aardvark Publishes A Research Paper Offering Unprecedented Insights Into Social Search

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/IMDRrISRf-8/

In 1998, Larry Page and Sergey Brin published a paper[PDF] titled Anatomy of a Large-Scale Hypertextual Search Engine, in which they outlined the core technology behind Google and the theory behind PageRank. Now, twelve years after that paper was published, the team behind social search engine Aardvark has drafted its own research paper that looks at the social side of search. Dubbed Anatomy of a Large-Scale Social Search Engine, the paper has just been accepted to WWW2010, the same conference where the classic Google paper was published.

Aardvark will be posting the paper in its entirety on its official blog at 9 AM PST, and they gave us the chance to take a sneak peek at it. It’s an interesting read to say the least, outlining some of the fundamental principles that could turn Aardvark and other social search engines into powerful complements to Google and its ilk. The paper likens Aardvark to a ‘Village’ search model, where answers come from the people in your social network; Google is part of ‘Library’ search, where the answers lie in already-written texts. The paper is well worth reading in its entirety (and most of it is pretty accessible), but here are some key points:

  • On traditional search engines like Google, the ‘long-tail’ of information can be acquired with the use of very thorough crawlers. With Aardvark, a breadth of knowledge is totally reliant on how many knowledgeable users are on the service. This leads Aardvark to conclude that “the strategy for increasing the knowledge base of Aardvark crucially involves creating a good experience for users so that they remain active and are inclined to invite their friends”. This will likely be one of Aardvark’s greatest challenges.
  • Beyond asking you about the topics you’re most familiar with, Aardvark will actually look at your past blog posts, existing online profiles, and tweets to identify what topics you know about.
  • If you seem to know about a topic and your friends do too, the system assumes you’re more knowledgeable than if you were the only one in a group of friends to know about that topic.
  • Aardvark concludes that while the amount of trust users place in information on engines like Google is related to a source website’s authority, the amount they trust a source on Aardvark is based on intimacy, and how they’re connected to the person giving them information
  • Some parts of the search process are actually easier for Aardvark’s technology than they are for traditional search engines. On Google, when you type in a query, the engine has to pair you up with exact websites that hold the answer to your query. On Aardvark, it only has to pair you with a person who knows about the topic — it doesn’t have to worry about actually finding the answer, and can be more flexible with how the query is worded.
  • As of October 2009, Aardvark had 90,361 users, of whom 55.9% had created content (asked or answered a question). The site’s average query volume was 3,167.2 questions per day, with the median active user asking 3.1 questions per month. Interestingly, mobile users are more active than desktop users. The Aardvark team attributes this to users wanting quick, short answers on their phones without having to dig for anything. They also think people are more used to using more natural language patterns on their phones.
  • The average query length was 18.6 words (median of 13) versus 2.2-2.9 words on a standard search engine.  Some of this difference comes from the more natural language people use (with words like “a”, “the”, and “if”).  It’s also because people tend to add more context to their queries, with the knowledge that it will be read by a human and will likely lead to a better answer.
  • 98.1% of questions asked on Aardvark were unique, compared with between 57 and 63% on traditional search engines.
  • 87.7% of questions submitted were answered, and nearly 60% of them were answered within 10 minutes.  The median answering time was 6 minutes and 37 seconds, with the average question receiving two answers.  70.4% of answers were deemed to be ‘good’, with 14.1% as ‘OK’ and 15.5% were rated as bad.
  • 86.7% of Aardvark users had been asked by Aardvark to answer a question, of whom 70% actually looked at the question and 38% could answer.  50% of all members had answered a question (including 75% of all users who had ever actually interacted with the site), though 20% of users accounted for 85% of answers.
Information provided by CrunchBase


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Tuesday, February 2nd, 2010 digital No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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