lawsuits

Johnny Manziel Lawsuit May Have Inadvertently Opened The Door For Cheating In College Football

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/johnny-manziel-lawsuit-may-have-inadvertently-opened-the-door-for-cheating-in-college-football-2013-2

Johnny Manziel

A corporation formed by Johnny Manziel has filed a lawsuit in Texas over the use of his trademarked nickname, “Johnny Football,” by a person selling t-shirts according to The Southeast Texas Record. But, in a move that could lead the way for more lawsuits, Darren Rovell of ESPN is reporting the NCAA has ruled that Manziel can keep any money he wins in the lawsuit.

While any athlete, amateur or professional, should be able to protect their own name, the ruling by the NCAA also opens the door for situations where a booster could intentionally infringe on a player’s trademark as way of being able to give money to the player.

Of course, the greatest irony here is how much money the NCAA and Texas A&M have made using Manziel’s name and likeness. Unfortunately he’ll never see a dime of that revenue.

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Monday, February 25th, 2013 news No Comments

Expired Groupons Are Valid Again After Court Ruling

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5898699/your-expired-groupons-are-valid-again-thanks-to-85-million-court-ruling

Your Expired Groupons Are Valid Again Thanks to $8.5 Million Court Ruling (Updated)Remember that deal you purchased on Groupon—$30 for a $50 laser hair removal? It expired, and your unibrow has grown out of control. But you’re in luck. Groupon has agreed to pay an $8.5 million settlement in a class action lawsuit claiming that expiration dates are illegal. Better yet, the court also ruled that you can use all those Groupons you bought that expired last year. Mulligan!

Your coupons are still good if they were purchased before Dec. 1, 2011. Most future Groupons won’t expire so quickly, either. The company agreed that for the next three years, no more than 10 percent of its coupons will carry a use-by date that is less than 30 days after the date of issue.

The settlement is a result of the consolidation of 17 lawsuits in a San Diego district court, which allege that Groupon is violating consumer protection laws. Shoppers feel like an expiration dates force them to buy something, the suit argues.

Groupon didn’t immediately respond to questions about how you can cash in on your bygone coupons. We’re also investigating how you can get in on the settlement. We’ll update when we have the info. [Bloomberg]

Update: Groupon told us if you have expired Groupons, you can redeem them in the normal way. Print out the coupon or load it up on your smartphone, and the merchant should honor it as usual.

Update 2: Groupon says your coupons are valid for the purchase price post-expiry. For example, if you paid $20 for a $40, you’d get the $20 credit. It also noted that this is not a new policy, nor was it dictated by the settlement.

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Wednesday, April 4th, 2012 digital No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5882869/even-after-shutting-down-limewire-cant-catch-a-break

Even After Shutting Down, LimeWire Can't Catch a BreakLimeWire has been kaput as a file-sharing service since October but that hasn’t stopped its legal woes. Now, after settling with the RIAA to the tune of $105 million, the MPAA and a host of indie music labels have filed lawsuits against the company as well. Talk about beating a dead horse.

Six studios—Twentieth Century Fox, Viacom, Comedy Partners, Disney, Paramount Pictures, and Warner Brothers—have filed suit, citing the court’s summary judgement in the RIAA case as basis for their claims. In that case, the court concluded that LimeWire “intentionally encouraged direct infringement.” Now, the court will have to decide LimeWire’s culpability in the illicit trade of movies and TV shows as well.

In addition, a group of independent record labels are arguing that, because of the same summary judgement, that they too are owed $105 million. There’s no word yet on how much the MPAA is asking for in damages, but if its anything near what it enjoy threatening the common user with, LimeWire’s going to need to find some deeper pockets. [Hollywood Reporter via Techdirt]

Image: Pakhnyushcha / Shutterstock

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Monday, February 6th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Google Gets Serious About Youtube Royalties with Rightsflow Purchase [Google]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5867476/google-gets-serious-about-youtube-royalties-with-rightsflow-purchase

Google Gets Serious About Youtube Royalties with Rightsflow PurchaseGoogle announced on Friday that it has purchased the music licensing company RightsFlow for its detailed information about who should get paid when any of over 30 million songs get played.

Neither Google nor Rightsflow would comment on the deal beyond their official statements, but we have pieced together some of the reasons Google would purchase a music licensing company like RightsFlow, which deals with “mechanical” royalties owed to songwriters, publishers, and other copyright holders. They whenever a non-human thing – like a compact disc, website, or music app –plays music.

RightsFlow, pictured here, now belongs to Google, which will use it to simplify royalty accounting on YouTube and possibly other music services.

The big reason Google would do this is that YouTube continues to be such a massive free music destination. It simply made more sense to buy RightsFlow outright to help keep its administrative and legal costs down, than to continue to rely on its services alongside other RightsFlow clients such as Rhapsody.

To be clear, this doesn’t give Google any rights to this music; it just makes those rights easier to deal with.

The acquisition, announced on Friday (when companies typically announce stuff they don’t want people paying attention to) is more evidence that Google is serious about YouTube as a free music destination. It should now be able to add even more music without worrying as much about lawsuits or expensive accounting.

Once Google has identified songs uploaded to YouTube using its Content ID fingerprinting technology, it should be able to figure out more easily which publishers and songwriters to pay. This could also help Google deal with its Google music store or other Google stuff in the future, although for now, Google’s focus for this deal is squarely on YouTube.

RightsFlow, recently named the #8 most desirable place to work in New York by Crain’s New York Business, owns information that is mostly publicly available. What makes it valuable is its ability to search all that data, making it easier to license lots of songs at once.

So, basically, Google just acquired a search engine, sort of like Google itself – except now, it could just have just one (admittedly very busy) user.

Google Gets Serious About Youtube Royalties with Rightsflow Purchase Evolver.fm observes, tracks and analyzes the music apps scene, with the belief that it’s crucial to how humans experience music, and how that experience is evolving.


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Tuesday, December 13th, 2011 news No Comments

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