license

Facebook Will Always Own You

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5963299/facebook-will-always-own-you

Facebook Will Always Own YouBad news: the “copyright notice” you’ve been reading (and sharing, ugh) is completely bogus and a waste of everyone’s time. Facebook owns the photos, videos, and statuses you upload, and that’s not going to change just because you say so.

But here’s something you can do that might actually make a difference.

When you signed up for Facebook, you agreed to Facebook’s Terms of Service (ToS). These are the rules you agree to play by so long as you use Facebook, period. They’re Facebook’s rules. Odds are you didn’t bother reading the ToS before you signed up, because Facebook was new and exciting and who ever reads that stuff anyway? No one does.

Half a decade or so later, we’re still bound by those rules—and that means that, despite all the hoaxes floating around today that might tell you otherwise, Facebook owns the pictures and videos you share. And you can’t opt out, ever, because you agreed to this:

(I’ll bold the important parts)

Your Content and Information

You own all of the content and information you post on Facebook, and you can control how it is shared through your privacy and application settings. In addition:

For content that is covered by intellectual property rights, like photos and videos (IP content), you specifically give us the following permission, subject to your privacy and application settings: you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook (IP License). This IP License ends when you delete your IP content or your account unless your content has been shared with others, and they have not deleted it.

When you delete IP content, it is deleted in a manner similar to emptying the recycle bin on a computer. However, you understand that removed content may persist in backup copies for a reasonable period of time (but will not be available to others).

In short: if you upload a photo, Facebook is 100%, completely allowed to use it (or sell it) until you delete that photo or delete your account. This isn’t to say that it does any of this stuff—and in fact Facebook is adamant that it does not—just reserving the right to at some point in the future.

But those rules aren’t written in stone. Instead of posting pointless copyright notices, to your timeline, try something that might actually get something done. Say you don’t want the photos you take of your private life to be potentially sold by a company with shareholders whose interests aren’t yours. Say you object specifically to the wording of Section 2.1 of the Facebook ToS:

The photos, videos, thoughts, and all other intellectual property I create should remain mine unless I tell Facebook they can own it. Facebook should remove section 2.1 from its Terms of Service, terminating its “transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post.” Short of this, I should be allowed to opt-out of this agreement with Facebook.

Ask your friends to like and comment (or even share) if they agree.

Or better yet, send it to Facebook customer service.

It’s a longshot, but at the very least you’ll be sharing a sentiment that’s not pure misinformation and naïveté. Sharing fake copyright BS is an annoyance. Sharing a sincere grievance isn’t. But remember: until anything changes, Facebook will own the text of your grievance in full.

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Monday, November 26th, 2012 news No Comments

The Cost Of Supporting Nokia

Source: https://intelligence.businessinsider.com/welcome

Microsoft is paying Nokia a steep price to push Windows Phone 8.

This chart shows trailing 4 quarter profits for Microsoft’s Entertainment & Devices group, which includes smartphones and the Xbox. (Using T4 smooths the profit spikes that happen every holiday season, which is the second quarter of Microsoft’s fiscal year.)

After years of losses, the E&D group was consistently in the black. In the 2010 holiday season (Q2’11) Microsoft introduced Kinect, driving profits even higher.

But a year later, Microsoft began paying Nokia $250 million every quarter for carrying Windows Phone 8. In exchange, Nokia pays Microsoft a license fee (estimated at under $20) for every Windows Phone it sells. (The arrangement between the two has other elements as well, like technology sharing.)

Unfortunately, Nokia’s flagship Windows Phone, the Lumia 900, is selling poorly. So poorly, in fact, that the company just cut its price in half.

So Nokia helped send the E&D back into the red — it’s lost more than $200 million in each of the last two quarters. If Windows Phone sales don’t pick up, E&D will turn into a consistent money loser again.

Microsoft trailing 4 E&D P&L

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Friday, July 20th, 2012 news No Comments

It Would Cost 37 Billion Dollars a Year To Screen YouTube Videos

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5914188/it-would-cost-37-billion-per-year-to-pre+screen-youtube-videos

It Would Cost $37 Billion Per Year to Pre-Screen YouTube VideosLast week, we reported that a staggering 72 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute. Now, engineer Craig Mansfield has worked out how much it would cost per year to pre-screen all that video for copyright infringements—and the answer is close to that of Google’s annual revenue.

Mansfield calculated that a team of 199,584 judges—or equally qualified individuals—would be required to watch and rule over the video, which in turn would cost $36,829,468,840. For comparison, Google’s revenue for 2011 was $37,905,000,000.

Even if it were possible to find a cheaper labor source, the costs would still be astronomical. If you’re interested, you can read his working in detail. [Craig Mansfield via TechDirt]

Image by Rego – d4u.hu under Creative Commons license

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Wednesday, May 30th, 2012 digital No Comments

A Raid On A Luxury Ski Resort Has Uncovered The True Scale Of Tax Evasion In Italy

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/italy-tax-ski-resort-2012-1


italy ski resort

A raid by Italian tax officials on a luxury ski resort revealed dire rates of tax evasion, reports the Telegraph

Officials traced the license plates of several of the Lamborginis, Ferraris and other high-end vehicles that lined the streets of Cortina d’Ampezzo, a popular ski resort among wealthy Italians. In all, 133 vehicles were investigated; the owners of 42 of these were found to have reported annual salaries of less than $28,000 a year. 

The investigators also reportedly found that hotels, restaurants and boutiques in the resort were wildly under-declaring how much income they were generating. 

For example, Reuters reports that restaurants being studied by authorities were issuing sales receipts amounting to 300 percent more sales than the previous year. This demonstrated the fact that such establishments had not previously issued sales receipts in order to cut down their tax bills. 

The news wire also added that tax evasion is becoming such a severe problem in Italy that the government is installing special dogs at borders, designed to sniff out bank notes with the aim of stopping people smuggling their savings abroad. 

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Thursday, January 5th, 2012 news No Comments

A Raid On A Luxury Ski Resort Has Uncovered The True Scale Of Tax Evasion In Italy

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/italy-tax-ski-resort-2012-1


italy ski resort

A raid by Italian tax officials on a luxury ski resort revealed dire rates of tax evasion, reports the Telegraph

Officials traced the license plates of several of the Lamborginis, Ferraris and other high-end vehicles that lined the streets of Cortina d’Ampezzo, a popular ski resort among wealthy Italians. In all, 133 vehicles were investigated; the owners of 42 of these were found to have reported annual salaries of less than $28,000 a year. 

The investigators also reportedly found that hotels, restaurants and boutiques in the resort were wildly under-declaring how much income they were generating. 

For example, Reuters reports that restaurants being studied by authorities were issuing sales receipts amounting to 300 percent more sales than the previous year. This demonstrated the fact that such establishments had not previously issued sales receipts in order to cut down their tax bills. 

The news wire also added that tax evasion is becoming such a severe problem in Italy that the government is installing special dogs at borders, designed to sniff out bank notes with the aim of stopping people smuggling their savings abroad. 

Please follow Europe on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

See Also:




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Thursday, January 5th, 2012 news No Comments

Groupon Deal Strands Customers In Vegas [Social Networks]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5844103/groupon-deal-strands-customers-in-las-vegas

Groupon Deal Strands Customers In VegasSeveral Internet bargain hunters wanting to visit Vegas on the cheap found out the hard way that some deals are just too good to be true.

Several Groupon and Voice Daily Deals Users users bought round-trip bus tickets from Southern California to Las Vegas for $45. The price was great, but the trip was a mini disaster due to the negligence of LUX Ground Transportation, the bus company that provided the deal.

The problems started right at the beginning with many buses arriving hours later than scheduled or, sometimes, not showing up at all. When the buses did arrive, they brought their passengers safely to Las Vegas, but never returned to bring them home. Oops.

All’s well that ends well, though. A shuttle from another company was called in to rescue these abandoned passengers. And Groupon eventually canceled the deal and refunded customer’s money. LUX didn’t fare as well. It appears the company was operating without a business license and has shuttered its doors now that the world’s eyes are upon it. [MSNBC]


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Tuesday, September 27th, 2011 news No Comments

When ads invade license plates, you know the end is near

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5568729/california-license-plates-to-become-electronic-billboards

California License Plates Are the Next Electronic BillboardsYou probably paid a bit too much for your car, but you know what would really be the cherry on top of that upgraded paint job? A mini electronic advertisement that’s completely out of your control!

The California Legislature is considering a bill that would begin the research process of digital license plates—license plates that would replace age-old stamped metals. From what we can tell, the system would display your normal license plate number whenever your car was in motion. But stop for four seconds, and the plate switches over to advertise a service or product.

Of course, politicians are quick to remind the public, the ad revenue for a state that’s $19 billion in debt is only a small reason for turning every citizen’s car into a cheesy mobile billboard. Drivers will also be able to further customize the plates with personalized messages and support for their favorite sports teams.

It’ll be a tragedy when California eventually falls into the ocean, but I’ll tell you, the state is really taking proactive steps in shortening the mandatory 3-week mourning period. [MercuryNews]

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Monday, June 21st, 2010 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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