marketing-strategy

Marketers Put More Work in the Hands of In-House Agencies

source: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/Marketers-Put-More-Work-Hands-of-In-House-Agencies/1010228

Cost-cutting drives changes

A growing contingent of client-side marketers are turning to in-house agencies to take more ownership of their advertising and marketing strategy.

According to an Association of National Advertisers (ANA) survey, 58% of US client-side marketers said their company used an in-house agency this year, compared to only 42% who five years earlier said the same. And 56% of respondents said in May 2013 that in the past three years, they had moved at least some established business previously handled by an external agency to their in-house agency.

Magazine advertising, social media, online display advertising and search engine marketing were the services most commonly handled by an in-house agency, according to the study. The proliferation of digital marketing channels may be convincing companies to move more marketing in-house, so they can be more responsive and create a full breadth of material at lower cost. Still, only small percentages of in-house agencies handled most of these services, indicating that much work still sits squarely with external agencies.

Traditional TV and radio advertising were the least likely formats to be handled in-house.

Marketers cited cost savings as the most significant advantage of bringing agency work in-house in 2008. This year, it remained the top advantage, however one cited by far fewer respondents.

Five years earlier, more than half of marketers saw cost efficiencies as an in-house agency’s primary advantage, whereas in! 2013, that figure had dropped to 35%. Other factors instead took on greater precedence: 19% of marketers cited brand expertise, as well as institutional knowledge and the added benefit of a team dedicated to the company or brand. This indicates that marketers have become more satisfied by the quality of work created by in-house agencies.

But the disadvantages also stacked up. Forty-five percent of the survey respondents said it would not be as easy to stay on top of key trends with an in-house agency. That was more than the percentage of marketers who saw this as a challenge in 2008, and suggests that digital channels amplify the importance of understanding the latest marketing opportunities. Creative innovation was also seen as more lacking when agencies moved in-house, along with limited skill sets among the staff.

The digital marketing age seems to be forcing marketers to navigate between two competing impulses—the need to produce more marketing than ever before across ever-proliferating channels is making in-house agencies particularly attractive. But the skills needed to effectively leverage and communicate via these channels are still often seen as best handled by agencies fully dedicated to the advertising and marketing space.

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Thursday, September 19th, 2013 news No Comments

Leads Take Hold as the Primary Goal of Content Marketing – eMarketer

source: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/Leads-Take-Hold-Primary-Goal-of-Content-Marketing/1010107

Content marketing saw its importance balloon between 2012 and 2013. According to conference organizer IMN’s “2013 Content Marketing Survey Report,” the number of US companies with formal content marketing strategies in place jumped from 28% in 2012 to 49% in 2013, while those without a content strategy contracted from 26% to 18% during the same period.

And even if not all companies surveyed had a content marketing strategy in place at the time, another one-third said they were working on one, suggesting that by 2014, the percentage engaging in content marketing will only go up.

161362 Leads Take Hold as the Primary Goal of Content Marketing   eMarketer

As more have focused their efforts on content, the purposes of the tactic are convering on one key goal: lead generation. Last year, increasing leads was the No. 4 goal among marketing professionals—cited by only 16%— behind engagement, awareness and loyalty. This year, generating more leads was the No. 1 goal, cited by 44% of respondents, far ahead of any other response.

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Tuesday, August 6th, 2013 news No Comments

9 in 10 Believe Multichannel Marketing to Boost Sales, Profit

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/direct/9-in-10-believe-multichannel-marketing-boosts-sales-profit-22906/

sitecore-perceptions-multichannel-marketing-august2012.png87% of marketing decision-makers from around the world believe they will drive more sales and profit by evolving into effective multichannel marketing organizations, according to [download page] a study released in August 2012 by Sitecore, conducted by Forrester Research. Virtually the same proportion (86%) agree (top-2 box score on a 5-point scale) that successfully integrating multiple channels under a single integrated marketing strategy is critical to their long-term success.

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Friday, July 12th, 2013 news No Comments

The Marketing Strategy This Energy Drink Used To Take On Red Bull And Become A Billion Dollar Brand

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-marketing-strategy-this-energy-drink-used-to-take-on-red-bull-and-become-a-billion-dollar-brand-2012-2


rockstar

The energy drink world has long been dominated by Red Bull, with Monster forever lingering in second place.

But there’s another caffeine-packed beverage that’s rising to the top tier: Rockstar.

BevNET reports that Rockstar has reached the $1 billion annual threshold for the the first time this year, and skyrocketed up 18 percent from last year in terms of dollar sales.

Now, it’s third in its category — behind Red Bull and Monster — and it doesn’t advertise nationally.

So, what’s Rockstar’s secret?

Here’s what Rockstar attributes much of its success to:

“Its brand has clearly resonated with consumers, partly due to the product itself, and partly due to its image: a sturdy black can with gold and red lettering, gold star icon and provocative slogan (Party like a ROCKSTAR!), not to mention a brand name suggestive of celebrity, high energy and sex appeal.”

It’s all about how consumers perceive themselves when they’re drinking it, not the taste of the drink. Even the function of the drink (that energy boost factor) usually outweighs the taste in this beverage category.

Just because they don’t put up big TV spots doesn’t mean Rockstar doesn’t promote itself — the brand spends more than double the industry average on promotion. But it does it at a much more granular, targeted level than big beverage corporations.

It comes down to strong and consistent branding. Everything about Rockstar fits together — scantily-clad women, the promise of an celebrity lifestyle and fast-paced excitement. That’s what the core demographics of energy drink consumers (teens, college kids, and young adults) want.

Its brand keeps itself different from industry leader Red Bull as well. Red Bull focuses everything around its “Red Bull gives you wings” tagline, which you see often in big TV spots. It primarily sponsors sports like snowboarding, freestyle motocross and air racing to drive its message home.

Rockstar is also prevalent in the extreme sports world, but it’s also heavily into entertainment, piling on that idea of a rockstar lifestyle. Its empowering, aspirational tone is stronger than the other brands, promising to help you achieve that lifestyle.

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Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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