memory

SanDisk makes 128-gigabit flash chip, crams three bits per cell, takes afternoon off

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/02/22/sandisk-makes-128-gigabit-flash-chip-crams-three-bits-per-cell/

SanDisk has developed a chip that earns it membership in the exclusive 128-gigabit club. Not content with simply matching the Micron / Intel effort, SanDisk and its partner Toshiba claim their new memory uses 19- rather than 20-nanometer cells in the production process. Shrinking the size is one thing, but SanDisk’s new chips also use its X3 / three-bit technology. Most memory stores just two bits per cell; cramming in another means fewer cells, less silicon, more savings, cheaper memory, happier geeks. Analyst Jim Handy estimates that the price per gigabyte for the tri-bit breed of flash could be as low as 28 cents, compared to 35 for the Micron / Intel equivalent. Full details in the not-so-compact press release after the break.

Continue reading SanDisk makes 128-gigabit flash chip, crams three bits per cell, takes afternoon off

SanDisk makes 128-gigabit flash chip, crams three bits per cell, takes afternoon off originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 22 Feb 2012 19:37:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012 news No Comments

Groupon, “the end is nigh”

It’s hard to believe that another company could outdo Mercata’s spectacular $100 million flameout in 2000 in the first dot com bubble crash. But Groupon is about to do just that – by being bigger, badder, and even more spectacular. It raised $1 BILLION and will flame out before the year is out (my prediction from January 2011: Prediction: Groupon is/will be the biggest pump-and-dump scheme of all time (or in recent memory) )

Despite the recent reports of Facebook shuttering its daily deals offering, Yelp scaling back its service, and Groupon “not paying much attention” to it, I believe it is not so much that they could not compete with Groupon but that the market was smaller than previously expected and that it had mostly been tapped out already. If most merchants say they will not do another Groupon like campaign again and when revenue per merchant in mature markets like Boston are off by 60% in the space of a year, those trends don’t bode well for Groupon or any daily deal site.

I have not always been bearish about Groupon and I think they did 2 things brilliantly that helped it break through where previous group buying and deal sites could not: 1) leveraged social media and people sharing with others – a deal does not become activated unless the minimum number of people buy it (so friends will share with exactly those friends who they know will also like the deal); and 2) there was a deadline to buy the deal once it was activated; if you’ve ever missed buying a deal you will try not to miss another one. This triggers the desired action.  These are the 2 positives that should be replicated going forward.

But all the other bad things and screwups (since Groupon’s inception) should be avoided :-).  See below for the chorus and refrains.

Insider Selling took $870 million of the $1 billion off the table for investors and founders.
http://www.businessinsider.com/insider-selling-groupon-2011-6

Andrew Mason fires back at critics via email, but in doing so may have violated “quiet period”
http://www.businessinsider.com/andrew-mason-fires-back-at-groupon-critics-2011-8

Wired had to pull its IPO in 1996 after a similar “employee email.”
http://www.businessinsider.com/andrew-mason-fires-back-at-groupon-critics-2011-8
http://www.businessinsider.com/groupon-letter-sec-2011-8
http://allthingsd.com/20110825/exclusive-groupons-mason-tells-troops-in-feisty-internal-memo-it-looks-good/

Groupon’s PR boss suddenly quits after 2 months on the job, and just before Mason’s “employee email”
http://www.businessinsider.com/groupons-pr-boss-quit-right-before-andrew-mason-sent-out-that-controversial-memo-last-week-2011-8

Groupon’s China operations are imploding
http://www.businessinsider.com/this-is-how-badly-things-are-going-on-in-china-for-groupon-2011-9

Groupon’s traffic tumbles 50% from June to August
http://www.mediapost.com/publications/?fa=Articles.showArticle&art_aid=157694&nid=130453

Groupon’s revenue per merchant in mature markets like Boston is off more than 60% YoY
http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-groupon-boston-revenue-2011-8

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Saturday, September 3rd, 2011 news No Comments

This Is What Your Wikipedia Edits Look Like

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5495353/this-is-what-your-wikipedia-edits-look-like

Normally I’d file this image under our “what is this” image cache, but as you’ve already clocked, it’s somehow related to our Memory [Forever] theme. Those pretty colors are a visualization of the thousands of Wikipedia edits made by a bot.

It’s not just a one-off visualization for adding to our Tumblrs either. It’s the work of Many Eyes, a website set up by a pair of computer scientists at IBM, to catalog visual representations of data. Looking at the site now, two years after Wired brought it to light and interviewed founder Martin Wattenberg, recent artworks tackle the issue of migration in the US, and cremations.

When asked by Wired back then why he’s so keen to visualize data, Watterberg responded that:

“Language is one of the best data-compression mechanisms we have. The information contained in literature, or even email, encodes our identity as human beings. The entire literary canon may be smaller than what comes out of particle accelerators or models of the human brain, but the meaning coded into words can’t be measured in bytes. It’s deeply compressed. Twelve words from Voltaire can hold a lifetime of experience.”

Wikipedia data remains a favorite for them though, thanks to the “idea of completeness” Watterberg talks about, that even though all the data on Wikipedia equals a terabyte or so, “it’s huge in terms of encompassing human knowledge.” [Many Eyes via Wired]

Memory [Forever] is our week-long consideration of what it really means when our memories, encoded in bits, flow in a million directions, and might truly live forever.

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Wednesday, March 17th, 2010 news No Comments

How Google Crunches All That Data

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5495097/how-google-crunches-all-that-data

If data centers are the brains of an information company, then Google is one of the brainiest there is. Though always evolving, it is, fundamentally, in the business of knowing everything. Here are some of the ways it stays sharp.

For tackling massive amounts of data, the main weapon in Google’s arsenal is MapReduce, a system developed by the company itself. Whereas other frameworks require a thoroughly tagged and rigorously organized database, MapReduce breaks the process down into simple steps, allowing it to deal with any type of data, which it distributes across a legion of machines.

Looking at MapReduce in 2008, Wired imagined the task of determining word frequency in Google Books. As its name would suggest, the MapReduce magic comes from two main steps: mapping and reducing.

The first of these, the mapping, is where MapReduce is unique. A master computer evaluates the request and then divvies it up into smaller, more manageable “sub-problems,” which are assigned to other computers. These sub-problems, in turn, may be divided up even further, depending on the complexity of the data set. In our example, the entirety of Google Books would be split, say, by author (but more likely by the order in which they were scanned, or something like that) and distributed to the worker computers.

Then the data is saved. To maximize efficiency, it remains on the worker computers’ local hard drives, as opposed to being sent, the whole petabyte-scale mess of it, back to some central location. Then comes the second central step: reduction. Other worker machines are assigned specifically to the task of grabbing the data from the computers that crunched it and paring it down to a format suitable for solving the problem at hand. In the Google Books example, this second set of machines would reduce and compile the processed data into lists of individual words and the frequency with which they appeared across Google’s digital library.

The finished product of the MapReduce system is, as Wired says, a “data set about your data,” one that has been crafted specifically to answer the initial question. In this case, the new data set would let you query any word and see how often it appeared in Google Books.

MapReduce is one way in which Google manipulates its massive amounts of data, sorting and resorting it into different sets that reveal new meanings and have unique uses. But another Herculean task Google faces is dealing with data that’s not already on its machines. It’s one of the most daunting data sets of all: the internet.

Last month, Wired got a rare look at the “algorithm that rules the web,” and the gist of it is that there is no single, set algorithm. Rather, Google rules the internet by constantly refining its search technologies, charting new territories like social media and refining the ones in which users tread most often with personalized searches.

But of course it’s not just about matching the terms people search for to the web sites that contain them. Amit Singhal, a Google Search guru, explains, “you are not matching words; you are actually trying to match meaning.”

Words are a finite data set. And you don’t need an entire data center to store them—a dictionary does just fine. But meaning is perhaps the most profound data set humanity has ever produced, and it’s one we’re charged with managing every day. Our own mental MapReduce probes for intent and scans for context, informing how we respond to the world around us.

In a sense, Google’s memory may be better than any one individual’s, and complex frameworks like MapReduce ensure that it will only continue to outpace us in that respect. But in terms of the capacity to process meaning, in all of its nuance, any one person could outperform all the machines in the Googleplex. For now, anyway. [Wired, Wikipedia, and Wired]

Image credit CNET

Memory [Forever] is our week-long consideration of what it really means when our memories, encoded in bits, flow in a million directions, and might truly live forever.

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Wednesday, March 17th, 2010 news No Comments

HP Mini 311 Nvidia ION Netbook Hackintosh’ed

screenshots to come

Source: http://www.insanelymac.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=189621&pid=1296786

Specifications pertinent to Mac OS X:
Memory – 1024MB onboard with one open DDR3 SO-DIMM slot for up to 2048MB expansion, giving 3072MB total memory – Postpunk confirmed
Chipset – STATUSNVIDIA ION LE
Graphics – STATUSNVIDIA GeForce 9400M based (NVEnabler, LCD, 1366×768, QE/CI) – adachis/supervisa confirmed DSDT may be an option
HDMI Port – UNKNOWNTESTING NEEDED
VGA Port – UNKNOWNTESTING NEEDED
Universal Serial Bus – STATUSNVIDIA ION LE
Microprocessor – STATUSIntel Atom N270/N280 – Researching better fixes to remove need for NullCPUPowerManagement
Keyboard – STATUSPS/2 based – ApplePS2Old – adachis confirmed
Trackpad – STATUSAlps Electric – PS/2 based – ApplePS2Old – adachis confirmed
Local Storage – STATUSNVIDIA nForce Serial ATA Controller
Wireless – G-STATUS / N-STATUSBCM4312(G) (adachis confirmed) and BCM943224(N) (PZZ confirmed)
Network – STATUS10/100 NVIDIA nForce MCP79
Wireless WAN – UNKNOWNHP un2420 Mobile Broadband (Qualcom2000)
Bluetooth – STATUSUSB/PCIe Broadcom based – superviza confirmed
Audio – STATUSNVIDIA HDA (VoodooHDA works large amount of static overlay, try 16-bit – adachis confirmed) DSDT may be an option
Webcam – STATUSUSB Based HP Webcam-50 – superviza confirmed
External Optical – STATUSHP External 556s Optical Drive – theproto confirmed

Feature status:
Battery Status – STATUS VoodooBattery shows some functions – (adachis confirmed) so does AppleACPIBatteryManager (superviza confirmed)
Sleep/Hibernate/Suspend – STATUS MORE TESTING NEEDED – Not looking good OOB (superviza confirmed)
Trackpad Options – STATUS VoodooPS2 not recognizing trackpad – adachis confirmed
Shutdown/Reboot – STATUS superviza confirmed
Clamshell Switch – STATUS superviza confirmed
Power Button – STATUS superviza confirmed
SpeedStep or P/C-States – STATUS AppleLPC loaded and P/C-States are present –superviza/theproto confirmed

Status legend:
VANILLANo fixes needed or DSDT/EFI fixes used only
EXTRASExtra KEXTs needed but not located in /S/L/E
MODIFICATIONSModifications or additions to /S/L/E or any other system file
UNSUPPORTEDNo useable driver exists for the device/chipset
UNKNOWNInitial status indicating further testing/verification is needed

For download packages see:

http://www.insanelymac.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=189621&pid=1296786

Another thread making progress:

http://myhpmini.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=44&t=2402

source: http://www.liliputing.com/2009/10/hp-mini-311-ram-can-be-upgraded.html

HP Mini 311 RAM can be upgraded

hp mini 311 ram upgrade

The HP Mini 311 (or Compaq Mini 311C in Europe) comes with 1GB of RAM soldered to the motherboard. At first glance, that might make this NVIDIA ION-powered laptop a bit less attractive, since it somewhat limits your upgrade options. But Blogeee reports there’s good news: There is another RAM slot that users can take advantage of to upgrade the RAM.

All you have to do is pop open the back and slide in a 2GB module to upgrade the memory to 3GB.

Source: http://www.liliputing.com/2009/10/hp-mini-311-with-ion-graphics-can-run-os-x.html

HP Mini 311 with ION graphics can run OS X

311 osx

Want an 11.6 inch mini-laptop with high performance graphics, and the ability to run OS X? It looks like the HP Mini 311 fits the bill.

ASRock ION 330 hackintosh

Source: http://www.insanelymac.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=178372&st=0#entry1217787

Back to AugustineFou.com Tech Gadget Scrapbook

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Monday, October 12th, 2009 viral videos 3 Comments

no wonder banner ads get so few clicks :-)

Add-Art Replaces Advertisements with Artwork

Firefox only (Windows/Mac/Linux): Add-Art is a unique advertisement-blocking solution for Firefox. Instead of simply deleting ads from the page, it replaces them with art by featured artists.

The open-source project was inspired by the popularity of ad-blocking Firefox extensions—Adblock Plus, the perennial Lifehacker favorite, is downloaded over 250,000 times a week—and a desire to put all those blocked pitches to good use. Artists are selected by a team of curators to have their work displayed, and the roster is rotated every two weeks. An interesting twist to the project is that the artists themselves can target sites with their artwork—it’ll be up to you to decide why there are photographs of unicorns wearing party hats during your daily reading of the New York Times. Add-Art won’t be too tempting to those who ad-block to streamline for speed or memory use, but for those tired of seeing “ONE WEIGHT LOSS RULE” and the like might just enjoy the web a bit more. Add-Art is free, works wherever Firefox does.

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Tuesday, February 10th, 2009 digital, marketing No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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