mess

The Mobile Browser Landscape Is Fragmented

Source: https://intelligence.businessinsider.com/welcome

The mobile Web browser market is a mess. Most platforms have a default Web browser installed, often a customize one, and unlike desktop PCs, it’s hard to change that browser.

So platform market share gives you a good proxy for mobile browser market share. But  according to StatCounter, no mobile platform commands more than 25 percent of the global market.

The platform data is not as clean as one might like for understanding the mobile-browser landscape. For example, you should combine iPhone and iPod Touch data to get an idea of Apple’s mobile Safari market share. And some Android smartphones have a custom Android Web browser, while newer ones have Google Chrome preinstalled. Nokia is likewise a mess: It used to support Opera, it then featured its own Nokia Web browser for the Symbian smartphone operating system, and its newest Windows phones have mobile Internet Explorer.

Nonetheless, it is clear that the market is fragmented across platforms. As we’ve discussed before, this is a big problem for the development of HTML5 because these browsers do not supports a consistent feature set. As long as mo! bile bro wsers remain fragmented and no standards for HTML5 are ratified, native apps will still be king.

Mobile Browser Market Share

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Friday, September 14th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

AMC’s Advertising Shows Are A Mess

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-amcs-advertising-shows-are-a-mess-2012-5

Mad Men The Pitch AMC Ratings 2012

Early last week, we chronicled how AMC’s advertising competition show, The Pitch, had some seriously awful ratings.

The low ratings prompted AMC to move The Pitch from its Monday time slot to Sundays, following AMC’s other advertising show, Mad Men.

It’s hard to say the move didn’t work—viewership has doubled— but a new trend is emerging: Mad Men is struggling.

The most recent episode, which aired on Sunday, had just under two million viewers or one-third less viewers for when Mad Men first aired a one-hour episode this season on March 25. (It’s an over 45% drop-off from the 3.535 million viewers Mad Men claimed during its two-hour premier in March.)

It should be noted Mad Men debuted with record ratings and is still beating last season’s average. Although Netflix took credit for an added million viewers, i.e. the bulk of the difference between the record premiere and last season’s average.

We’ve mentioned it a few times before, but advertising shows traditionally do not work.

Despite not having a single positive trend in ratings since the season began, Mad Men will fare a lot better than The Pitch, which has failed to cross the 0.1 threshold from Nielsen since its debut while being described as an oversimplification, outdated and phantasmagoricaly awful from critics.

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Thursday, May 24th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5880812/the-new-blackberry-ad-campaign-is-proof-rim-has-entirely-lost-it

The New BlackBerry Ad Campaign Is Proof RIM Has Entirely Lost ItSay hello to The Bold Team. Sadly, this animated foursome is RIM’s attempt to capture the youth market. They urge the younger generation to “Be Bold”. Something tells me it won’t work.

This pink and purple mess looks a bit like an advertising executive just vomited his late-night cocktail onto a page and presented it to RIM. “That’ll do,” he probably thought. “They’re shafted anyway.”

The Bold Team are “bravely stepping out of 2011 and into 2012 filled with unlimited possibilities”. If you care to know more about RIM’s answer to the Power Rangers, there are four of them. You want a quick run through their biographies? Sure, there’s:

GoGo Girl, The Achiever: “Saving the day with a brilliant strategy”
Justin Steele, The Advocate: “Always ready to stick up for his friends”
Trudy Foreal, The Authentic: “Not afraid to call it as she sees it”.
Max Stone, The Adventurer: “Able to jump out of a plane…”

Presumably Max Stone is inspired by the RIM employees who got drunk on that plane.

A company which is shedding customers quicker than the Costa Concordia lost passengers, seeing its stock price fall week-on-week, and drafting in replacement CEOs, you’d expect to put some effort into advertising. Obviously not. RIM is completely out of touch. [Mobile Syrup via Pocket Lint]

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Tuesday, January 31st, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

The Owner Of Flash Sales Site Rue La La Is Laying Off A Big Chunk Of Its Staff

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-owner-of-flash-sales-site-rue-la-la-is-losing-up-to-half-its-staff-2012-1


rue la la

UPDATE: Rue La La has reached out to us to update the story with some additional information.

Rue La La just laid off 11 percent of its 500-person staff, according to the company.

The Boston Business Journal first reported the layoffs.

Site owner Retail Convergence is also shutting down SmartBargains.com, a discount shopping site, according to the report.

Some employees were offered other positions in the company, and everyone was offered some kind of severance package, a source close to the company told us.

“It was a mess upstairs. People were crying all over the place,” one unnamed employee told the Boston Business Journal. 

Rue La La operator Retail Convergence raised about $25 million from General Catalyst Partners and Breakaway Partners before being acquired by a company called GSI Commerce for $350 million, reports The Boston Business Journal.

eBay then bought GSI Commerce in 2009, and Rue La La got $500 million in debt and equity financing as part of the deal, according to the report. Retail Convergence, the owner of Rue La La and SmartBargains.com was spun out as part of that deal.

Here’s the full statement from Rue La La:

Since launching in 2008, Rue La La has transformed online shopping and has become a leader in the “private sale” shopping space.  In a continued effort to revolutionize off-price shopping, we have made the strategic decision to double down on our core business.  This heightened focus on our core includes the restructuring of our Rue Local business by outsourcing our sales force and consolidating SmartBargains.com into Rue La La. SmartBargains.com was originally launched 1999.  These moves unfortunately resulted in the elimination of some staff positions.  Rue La La has continued to see dramatic growth with nearly $300MM in sales in 2011 and similar growth planned for 2012 and beyond.

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Thursday, January 12th, 2012 news No Comments

The Most Popular Twitter Hashtags of 2011 [Twitter]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5865096/the-most-popular-twitter-hashtags-of-2011

The Most Popular Twitter Hashtags of 2011Sure you could say that Twitter has devolved into a chaotic mess filled with #AreWeSeriouslyTweetingThisLongHashtag and Bieber freaks, but it’s still boss at figuring out what’s going on at this very second. So taking a look back at the past year, what were the most popular Twitter moments in 2011? It gets a little weird.

It either speaks to my growing uncoolness or Twitter’s tween explosion that I have no idea what channel Pretty Little Liars is on, why Raven Symone is more popular than Natalie Portman on the actress list and how the Sony NGP a more talked about topic than the iPhone and Android. What is going on?!

My favorite list though, has to be the most popular food and drink items of 2011:

McLobster
Fried Kool-Aid
Starbucks Trenta
Devassa Beer
Guinness
BBQ
Mac & Cheese

We’re all so fat it is glorious. Anyway, here are the most popular Twitter hashtags of 2011:

#egypt
#tigerblood
#threewordstoliveby
#idontunderstandwhy
#japan
#improudtosay
#superbowl
#jan25

Hey egypt, japan, jan25 and even tigerblood and superbowl sum up the year fairly well! Good job tweeple. But #improudtosay, #idontunderstandwhy #threewordstoliveby managed to make the top freaking hashtags of the year. Let’s do better in 2012 Twitter. [“>Twitter]

The Most Popular Twitter Hashtags of 2011


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Monday, December 5th, 2011 news No Comments

How Google Crunches All That Data

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5495097/how-google-crunches-all-that-data

If data centers are the brains of an information company, then Google is one of the brainiest there is. Though always evolving, it is, fundamentally, in the business of knowing everything. Here are some of the ways it stays sharp.

For tackling massive amounts of data, the main weapon in Google’s arsenal is MapReduce, a system developed by the company itself. Whereas other frameworks require a thoroughly tagged and rigorously organized database, MapReduce breaks the process down into simple steps, allowing it to deal with any type of data, which it distributes across a legion of machines.

Looking at MapReduce in 2008, Wired imagined the task of determining word frequency in Google Books. As its name would suggest, the MapReduce magic comes from two main steps: mapping and reducing.

The first of these, the mapping, is where MapReduce is unique. A master computer evaluates the request and then divvies it up into smaller, more manageable “sub-problems,” which are assigned to other computers. These sub-problems, in turn, may be divided up even further, depending on the complexity of the data set. In our example, the entirety of Google Books would be split, say, by author (but more likely by the order in which they were scanned, or something like that) and distributed to the worker computers.

Then the data is saved. To maximize efficiency, it remains on the worker computers’ local hard drives, as opposed to being sent, the whole petabyte-scale mess of it, back to some central location. Then comes the second central step: reduction. Other worker machines are assigned specifically to the task of grabbing the data from the computers that crunched it and paring it down to a format suitable for solving the problem at hand. In the Google Books example, this second set of machines would reduce and compile the processed data into lists of individual words and the frequency with which they appeared across Google’s digital library.

The finished product of the MapReduce system is, as Wired says, a “data set about your data,” one that has been crafted specifically to answer the initial question. In this case, the new data set would let you query any word and see how often it appeared in Google Books.

MapReduce is one way in which Google manipulates its massive amounts of data, sorting and resorting it into different sets that reveal new meanings and have unique uses. But another Herculean task Google faces is dealing with data that’s not already on its machines. It’s one of the most daunting data sets of all: the internet.

Last month, Wired got a rare look at the “algorithm that rules the web,” and the gist of it is that there is no single, set algorithm. Rather, Google rules the internet by constantly refining its search technologies, charting new territories like social media and refining the ones in which users tread most often with personalized searches.

But of course it’s not just about matching the terms people search for to the web sites that contain them. Amit Singhal, a Google Search guru, explains, “you are not matching words; you are actually trying to match meaning.”

Words are a finite data set. And you don’t need an entire data center to store them—a dictionary does just fine. But meaning is perhaps the most profound data set humanity has ever produced, and it’s one we’re charged with managing every day. Our own mental MapReduce probes for intent and scans for context, informing how we respond to the world around us.

In a sense, Google’s memory may be better than any one individual’s, and complex frameworks like MapReduce ensure that it will only continue to outpace us in that respect. But in terms of the capacity to process meaning, in all of its nuance, any one person could outperform all the machines in the Googleplex. For now, anyway. [Wired, Wikipedia, and Wired]

Image credit CNET

Memory [Forever] is our week-long consideration of what it really means when our memories, encoded in bits, flow in a million directions, and might truly live forever.

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Wednesday, March 17th, 2010 news No Comments

Map of IP addresses around the world used to commit Click-Fraud

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/QE1Gthuy4_k/3-million-in-click-fraud-over-two-weeks-just-the-beginning

A recently disbanded click fraud ring in China racked up $3 million worth of clicks in two weeks. $3 million that we’re aware of. Just how detectable is this whole business of racking up fraudulent ad revenue clicks?

That intricate mess of lines above represents a portion of DormRing1, the click fraud bunch that was caught in China. The lines show the relationship of some of the IP addresses involved in the fraud and how they are connected to some fraudulent ad clicks. The whole network actually “involved 200,000 different IP addresses and racked up more than $3 million worth of fraudulent clicks across 2,000 advertisers in a two-week period.” Impressive and scary at the same time.

The trouble is that no one really knows how much ad revenue DormRing1 collected before they were caught. Click-fraud monitoring services such as Anchor Intelligence, the ones behind this catch, are evolving to keep up with the scale on which these rings are operating. It’s still difficult to judge just how well they’re doing as they’re having to infiltrate forums and gain the trust of the perpetrators in a manner reminiscent of drug busts. But as the criminals are getting more elaborate, the investigations are too.

That good news aside, do me a favor: after you read this post, comment, and all that jazz, refresh the page a few times and—Ah…I mean, heh…just kidding. [Tech Crunch]


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Friday, October 9th, 2009 digital No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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