microphone

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5884415/travelling-in-modern-china-requires-serious-secret-agent-skills

Travelling in Modern Day China Requires Cold War Era Secret Agent SkillsIf Kenneth G. Lieberthal were anything but a China expert at the Brookings institution, his travelling-in-China security procedures would read like the product of a paranoid mind that watched too many spy movies as a kid:

He leaves his cellphone and laptop at home and instead brings “loaner” devices, which he erases before he leaves the United States and wipes clean the minute he returns. In China, he disables Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, never lets his phone out of his sight and, in meetings, not only turns off his phone but also removes the battery, for fear his microphone could be turned on remotely. He connects to the Internet only through an encrypted, password-protected channel, and copies and pastes his password from a USB thumb drive. He never types in a password directly, because, he said, “the Chinese are very good at installing key-logging software on your laptop.”

Talk about overkill, right? Well he’s not alone. The Times reports that these seemingly paranoid precautions are par for the course for just about anyone with valuable information including government officials, researchers, and even normal businessmen who do business in China.

But what about the rest of us? I may not have any valuable state secrets or research that needs protecting but that doesn’t mean I want the Chinese government snooping on my internetting when I visit my grandparents (especially when the consequences can be so severe). In the past, I’ve relied on a combination of VPNs, TOR, and password-protecting everything I can, but now it sounds like even that isn’t enough. Or maybe it’s totally overkill given my general unimportance in the grand scheme of things. Dear readers, I ask you, how much security is enough when it comes to the average person on vacation? [NY Times]

Image credit: Shutterstock/Rynio Productions

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Sunday, February 12th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Teenage Engineering introduces Oplab musical prototyping platform

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/01/23/teenage-engineering-introduces-oplab-musical-prototyping-platfor/

Oplab

After finally getting the OP-1 up for order last January, Teenage Engineering is getting its second product to market — Oplab. The latest offering is meant to compliment its slick synth, but we can see plenty people falling in love with it on its own. The Oplab is a tinker kit and DIY platform, akin to Arduino or Microsoft’s .NET Gadgeteer, but designed explicitly for generating and manipulating sound. The main board, which retails for $299, is home to a trio of USB ports (two of them hosts), three MIDI connections (one in, one out and one sync) and a pair of CV in and CV out jacks. There’s also a bank of switches for changing settings and a host of connectors for plugging in various sensors. The Swedish company is offering a number of add-ons for $49 apiece: an accelerometer (Flip), a piezo microphone (Tap) and a pressure sensor (Poke). Strangely enough, there’s also a $149 a sneaker that has a rubber pouch that you can slip one of the aforementioned sensors into. Hit up the source link for more details and to order yours now.

Teenage Engineering introduces Oplab musical prototyping platform originally appeared on Engadg et on Mon, 23 Jan 2012 17:11:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Tuesday, January 24th, 2012 news No Comments

I Don’t Think I Want Polaroid’s Android Point And Shoot Camera Yet [Cameras]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5875014/i-dont-think-i-want-polaroids-android-point-and-shoot-camera-yet

I Don't Think I Want Polaroid's Android Point And Shoot Camera YetPolaroid is trying to stay relevant in the digital age with a camera that’s an Android mashup with a 3x optical zoom, 720p video, a 16 MB sensor and, well, a lot of head scratch.

The Android OS that powers the phone does have interesting capabilities—you’ll be able to edit photos on the fly, for example. And while it’s got WiFi and Bluetooth, there’s no always-on Internet connection, which makes it a little puzzling to me, as it’s not meant to replace your phone, and I’m not sure a 3x optical zoom is worth carrying two devices for, given how fantastic some of today’s phone cam capabilities are.

I Don't Think I Want Polaroid's Android Point And Shoot Camera YetBut. There was one really interesting thing about this camera that I’d love to see Polaroid is in talks with carriers to add data capabilities. It doesn’t have any yet, so this was really vague. But it’s likely going to have some sort of 3G capabilities at launch. I’d love to see that happen, and I’d love to see it get a speaker (right now while it has a microphone, it does not have a speaker). Combine data, a great camera, and Android and you’ve got a pretty great little go-anywhere VOIP phone that won’t force you to lock in a monthly minutes plan.

In any case, this thing will be out in the Fall, maybe with a data plan. No pricing. Could be interesting. Could be very much not so.


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Wednesday, January 11th, 2012 news No Comments

Why Does Amazon Need Its Own Voice Recognition Company? [Amazon]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5857972/why-does-amazon-need-a-voice-recognition-company

Why Does Amazon Need Its Own Voice Recognition Company?Amazon has, apparently, ponied up for a speech recognition company called Yap, the Atlantic reports.

Yap was an iPhone and Android app voicemail transcription service that would turn your audio voicemails into text, somewhat similar to Google Voice. It had generally positive reviews. It was purchased by a mysterious suitor in September, which CLT Blog traced back to Amazon’s address. On October 20, it shut down.

The question, of course, is what will Amazon do with it. Is this headed to mobile? Is it a Siri competitor? Android, the OS underpinning the Kindle Fire, already has voice control. And of course the Kindle Fire doesn’t have a microphone. Is it planning to use it on the Web as well as (or instead of) mobile? Could it be bringing voice recognition to its product search?

Whatever the plans are, it’s unlikely to simply let it die on the vine.

[CLTBlog via The Atlantic]


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Wednesday, November 9th, 2011 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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