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Papa John’s Faces $250 Million Lawsuit Over SMS Spam

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5960412/papa-johns-faces-250-million-lawsuit-over-sms-spam

Papa John's Faces $250 Million Lawsuit Over SMS SpamPapa John’s has clearly been a little over-eager with its digital promotion. Now, it’s facing a $250 million class-action lawsuit over all the spammy text messages it’s been sending you and everybody else around the US.

It’s alleged that Papa John’s sent 500,000 unwanted messages in early 2010, CNN Money reports. It gets worse: at times, customers were receiving 15 texts in a row, even in the middle of the night. Nobody needs a pizza offer that badly.

Of course, those texts were actually sent through a third-party text messaging service—in this case one called OnTime4U—so both companies will find themselves in the dock. And it could prove costly: the plaintiffs in the case are seeking damages of $500 per text. Think of all the pizza you could buy with that. [CNN Money]

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Wednesday, November 14th, 2012 news No Comments

Groupon Has Completely Collapsed (GRPN)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-groupon-stock-2012-4

Groupon’s stock has been absolutely crushed since the middle of February. The stock dropped another 5% today.

The bad news for shareholders is that it’s still arguably overpriced. With a $7 billion market cap, it’s trading at 3X revenue. It still has some room to fall.

The good news for shareholders is that it’s not going to zero. There’s a business in there, it just needs to find a proper valuation.

chart of the day, groupon stock, april 2012

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Sunday, April 22nd, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5882027/sharing-with-friends-of-friends-on-facebook-exposes-you-to-150000-people

Sharing with "Friends of Friends" on Facebook Exposes You to 150,000 PeopleWell this is mildly terrifying: according to a new Pew study, the Facebook privacy mode a lot of us rely on for photos and status updates is, on average, anything but private. Time to reconsider your settings, everyone.

The finding is staggering—Friends of Friends can hit as many as over seven million people:

Facebook users can reach an average of more than 150,000 Facebook users through their Facebook friends; the median user can reach about 31,000 others. At two degrees of separation (friends-of-friends), Facebook users in our sample can on average reach 156,569 other Facebook users. However, the relatively small number of users with very large friends lists, who also tended to have lists that are less interconnected, overstates the reach of the typical Facebook user. In our sample, the maximum reach was 7,821,772 other Facebook users. The median user (the middle user from our sample) can reach 31,170 people through their friends-of-friends.

When you think friend of a friend, the IRL analogue comes to mind. Your buddy’s buddy. That guy you met at a bar who seems okay. Your girlfriend’s pals from college. They must be okay people, right? They’re so narrowly removed from you, why not share all your photos with them?

Because 150,000+ people includes a hell of a lot of strangers you probably shouldn’t trust, and certainly don’t (and will never) know personally. You can read the study in its entirety below. [Pew]

PIP Facebook Users 2.3.12

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Friday, February 3rd, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

the whole story, regardless of where you jump in

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/01/30/follow-the-saga-engadget/

Over the years, stories have become more than just single bursts of information. These days, there’s as much drama in the consumer technology world as there is sports, politics or your average episode of Days of our Lives. Take SOPA, for example. We’d be remiss of our duties here if we simply reported on what it was, without ever following up on protests, delays, judgments and other vitally important developments. In fact, it’s tough to think of too many stories covered today that don’t correspond with some sort of saga — even the departure of RIM’s co-CEOs represents just a single slice of a far larger tale. For those that follow this stuff 24/7, jumping in at any point in the story is no issue; piecing together the past with the present is second nature. But if you’re actually working during the day, hopping aimlessly into an ongoing saga mid-stream can be downright disorienting. Painful, even. We’ve been working hard to come up with an unobtrusive solution, and we think we’ve found it.

We’ve actually had our Follow The Saga functionality since January of last year — we quietly debuted it with the launch of Verizon’s iPhone 4 — but today’s iteration is far more interactive. We’ve been testing these out over the past few weeks, and today we’re happy to officially introduce them. If you see the badge shown after the break in any post that pops up here at Engadget, just give it a click to be taken to the full saga, and scroll up and down to see related stories before and after the one you happen to ! be looki ng at. We’re hoping it’ll be particularly helpful to those who happen to stumble upon a saga somewhere in the middle, but want to get caught up on what happened prior and where we stand now. As with everything we do, we’ll be continually tweaking and evolving the tool in the months ahead. Enjoy!

Psst… want to see it in action? Have a look under the body of this SOPA post to see how we got to where we are today.

Continue reading Introducing ‘Follow The Saga’: the whole story, regardless of where you jump in

Introducing ‘Follow The Saga’: the whole story, regardless of where you jump in originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 30 Jan 2012 14:18:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Tuesday, January 31st, 2012 news No Comments

The Best Days of the Week to Buy Big-Ticket Items Online [Buying]

Source: http://lifehacker.com/5855776/the-best-days-of-the-week-to-buy-big+ticket-items-online

The Best Days of the Week to Buy Big-Ticket Items OnlineWe’ve looked at the best times to buy throughout the year, but when shopping online prices tend to fluctuate on a day-to-day basis. Discounts, deals, and price-comparison site Extrabux calculated the statistics and figured out when certain items are cheaper during the week.

Computers are cheapest on Mondays because manufacturers apply their rebates early in the week. This means online retailers can purchase computers for less and pass the savings on to you. This is not the case with every manufacturer, but Dell and Sony are among the companies that do this with their computers.

Mondays are also cheap days for TVs (and Tuesdays aren’t bad either) not only because of the same rebate situation, but because big sales days tend to be earlier in the week. This gives retailers an opportunity to draw more buyers in, and lower prices are a good way to do that. Cameras and video games also benefit from lower prices earlier in the week for the same reasons.

Major appliances tend to be cheapest on Sundays because that’s when the majority of people are searching for them. Washers, dryers, ovens, microwaves, refrigerators, and more are all Googled like crazy at the end of the week, so online retailers adjust their prices to draw people in.

Jewelry prices drop down on Wednesdays because that’s when searches take place as well. Apparently women tend to shop online most often in the middle of the week, and since women are the target market for most jewelry we see price drops to help attract buyers.

Books are at their lowest on Saturdays, although there isn’t a solid reason why. Perhaps people read more on Saturdays, or at least thing they should be reading more when the weekend finally rolls around.

For more information on why these prices fluctuate online on certain days, plus lots of pretty graphs, check out the full post over on Extrabux.

The Cheapest Days of the Week to Shop Online | Extrabux Blog


You can follow Adam Dachis, the author of this post, on Twitter, Google+, and Facebook.  Twitter’s the best way to contact him, too.


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Thursday, November 3rd, 2011 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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