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Quora Just Launched A Major Salvo At Google With Its Plan To Become The Internet’s ‘Library Of Alexandria’ (GOOG)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/quora-internet-library-of-alexandria-2012-12

adam d'angelo

Quora CEO Adam D’Angelo is nothing if not ambitious.

He just announced plans to dramatically expand the site’s goals beyond just asking and answering questions, declaring in a blog post that he hoped to build “an Internet-scale Library of Alexandria.”

That’s an implicit challenge to Google, which has long declared its mission to be “to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.”

But D’Angelo noted in his post that the

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Thursday, December 20th, 2012 news No Comments

Amazon adds ‘hundreds’ of Paramount movies to Prime, signals a Clear and Present Danger to free time

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/05/23/amazon-adds-hundreds-of-paramount-movies-to-prime/

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Amazon is keeping its pace of expanding Amazon Prime’s video collection every few months, and today it’s Paramount’s turn to swell the ranks. Instant Video is getting ‘hundreds’ of Paramount’s movies, including both relatively recent movies like Nacho Libre and Mission: Impossible III as well as back catalog titles like Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Clear and Present Danger. As always, the movies are watchable anywhere you’ve got broadband, and they don’t add a premium to the $79 yearly Prime subscription. Just be prepared to explain why you’re watching Urban Cowboy on your Kindle Fire at the airport.

Amazon adds ‘hundreds’ of Paramount movies to Prime, signals a Clear and Present Danger to free time originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 23 May 2012 10:49:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012 news No Comments

Satellite images reveal 8,000 years of civilization, rooftop pranks

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/03/21/satellite-images-reveal-civilizations/

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When on the hunt for ancient civilizations, it’s not all about Pyramids and monuments. Archaeologists have developed a method of spotting smaller human settlements using spy-satellite photos from the 60s, digital maps and modern multi-spectral images of the planet’s surface. The Scientists are looking for “anthrosols” which are left by decayed organic matter and mud-brick buildings. Containing a higher levels of organic matter, anthrosols impart a different texture and appearance to untouched soil, giving it a distinct visual signature. Software is used to spot these visual fingerprints from images over a 50 year period. Data from NASA’s Shuttle Radar Topography Mission is also used to determine the volume of the matter, and therefore the likely length of survival of the settlement. To give an idea of how prolific the system is, it’s believed to have discovered 14,000 settlement sites in a 23,000 square kilometer area of Syria alone — none of them Atlantis.

Satellite images reveal 8,000 years of civilization, rooftop pranks originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 21 Mar 2012 20:42:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Wednesday, March 21st, 2012 news No Comments

An Evolutionary Step In iPad Gaming [Ipadapps]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5582559/osmos-for-ipad-ambient-gaming-tailor+made-for-the-tablet

Osmos for iPad: An Evolutionary Step In iPad GamingWhen the iPad was unveiled and I started to imagine the types of games a 9″ touch screen might engender, I envisioned gorgeous, intuitive and, above all, immersive experiences. Osmos for iPad is one of the best I’ve found yet.

The game, which is adapted from a well-regarded PC version and costs $5 in the App Store, puts you in control of a tiny blue organism, a mote, which you direct around the screen, growing in size as you absorb the smaller blobs around you. Of course, all sorts of challenges, including bigger motes trying to absorb you, complicate that mission.

But what’s really special about Osmos is the experience of controlling that game play. Tapping behind your mote scoots him around the screen, predictably, but at any time you can pinch to zoom in or out, allowing you to navigate a tight passage or survey the level at a distance. Additionally, you can swipe with one finger to alter time—drag left and all the motes slow to a crawl, drag right and they shoot around like bouncy balls. Different speeds and levels of zoom have situations in which they’re uniquely useful, and these elegant controls are the perfect complement to the game’s polished visuals.

Osmos teaches you these gestures in early levels, but after that there’s little instruction. You’re given a basic goal and left to your own devices to go about achieving it. Depending on your style, the game play can be rambunctious or meditative, and often it’s both in the course of one level.

There’s not a huge variation in the game play, admittedly, and it’s so engrossing that I imagine most players will zip through the Odyssey track pretty quickly (there’s an arcade mode that lets you play levels one at a time, too). But in some ways this simplicity is the game’s biggest asset, because it allows for a remarkable cohesiveness between all of its elements, from game play and visual style down to the soundtrack and menus. It’s not only a “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts” type thing; here, the whole is so dazzlingly packaged that you don’t really think of the “parts” as parts at all.

For me, Osmos on the iPad is an experience first and a game second, and it uses the iPad to achieve game play that would be impossible—or, at least, not nearly as compelling—on any other platform. At its best, the iPad isn’t just an app machine or a gaming device but a portal into some other environment all together, and I hope that developers will follow Osmos’ lead and strive not just to adapt familiar gaming experiences to the tablet but to create new ones for it entirely. [iTunes]

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Friday, July 9th, 2010 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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