new technology

Fraunhofer iPad app guides liver surgery through augmented reality

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2013/08/22/fraunhofer-ipad-app-guides-liver-surgery/

Fraunhofer iPad app guides liver surgery through augmented reality

Liver surgery is more than a little dangerous — with so many blood vessels, one wrong cut can lead to disaster. Fraunhofer MEVIS has just tested a new generation of augmented reality iPad app that could minimize those risks. The tool puts a 3D vessel map on top of live video of a patient, telling the surgeon where it’s safe to make incisions. Doctors who do need to cut vessels can predict the level of blood loss and remove affected vessels from the map. The trial was successful enough that Fraunhofer MEVIS sees the new technology applying to surgery elsewhere in the body. If all goes well, there should be fewer accidents during tricky operations of many kinds — a big relief for those of us going under the knife.

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Thursday, August 22nd, 2013 news No Comments

Nike and Adidas Are 3D Printing Prototypes At “Impossible” Speeds

Source: http://gizmodo.com/nike-and-adidas-are-3d-printing-prototypes-at-impossib-512305901

Nike and Adidas Are 3D Printing Prototypes At "Impossible" Speeds

It shouldn’t come as a surprise that 3D printers are helping shoe manufacturers accelerate the prototyping of new shoes. But just how big is that impact? The Financial Times reports that both Nike and Adidas are embracing the semi-new technology and churning out prototypes at “previously impossible” speeds.

Adidas previously required a team of 12 technicians to make prototypes by hand. Now? No more than two. The company also reduced the time it takes to evaluate prototypes from four to six weeks to one or two days! Nike’s innovation director Shane Kohatsu had this to say about the development of its Vapor Laser Talon football cleats, a 5.6-ounce cleat built specifically for the 40-yard dash:

“Within six months we were able to go through 12 rounds of prototype iterations that we fully tested, and ultimately we were able to make super dramatic improvements to our products.”

Kohatsu went on to say that Nike would typically change out stud configurations, a relatively complex part, “every couple of years.”

That’s not to say we’ll be able to buy 3D-printed shoes anytime soon. The materials used in 3D printing aren’t exactly durable. Yet. [FT]

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Monday, June 10th, 2013 news No Comments

What You Need To Know About The Technology Driving Advertising Right Now

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-technology-driving-advertising-right-now-2012-3

 

your ad here, advertising, marketing

Media buying today is no easy task – it has to be simple, effective, and relevant.

Ask any buyer and they will tell you there are seemingly infinite choices available to them in selecting media for their clients.

How do they reach a final decision?  Price? Relationship? Brand? Environment? Big idea?

All of these are good reasons, but I’d postulate that information or insights that can be learned from the partner are increasingly an important part of the final buying process.

Buyers want and need to learn more about what is and isn’t working for their clients across all media channels in order to best optimize existing and future campaigns.

Many vendors and start-ups are trying to apply new technology to media in an effort to make inventory more valuable and effective for publishers and advertisers alike.

And, ideally, they are trying to use technology to fuse data with inventory, not only to differentiate themselves from the crowd pre-sale but also to generate post-campaign “learnings” to share with the client.

Top media and technology companies have long been optimizing campaigns from the start (the day the campaign goes live) to ensure clients get the results they are looking for.

Additionally, they are working with an array of technologies and partners, such as Compete and Dimestore, to provide actionable “learnings” during the campaign and afterwards.

By integrating post-buy reports with most branding programs, these companies are able to give marketers a view of their audience they rarely see and, more importantly, work hand and hand with them to build repeatable programs that work for clients.

Using data and technology to improve media effectiveness can be very rewarding – often clients see a tremendous lift in key brand measures.

But the application of technology takes patience, experience and a bit of art to find the right mix of capabilities to work for each client.   When media meets technology the impact can be impressive, but don’t assume just because you apply data or technology to media that you will get the desired result.

You need to work with a partner that has the people, platform and knowledge to apply technology appropriately and deliver the insights and results you expect.

What do you think?

The views expressed here reflect the views of the author alone, and do not necessarily reflect the views of 24/7 Real Media, its affiliates, subsidiaries or its parent company, WPP plc.

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Wednesday, March 7th, 2012 news No Comments

1 in 3 Viewers Despises Television And Wants To See It Die

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/poll-results-1-in-3-viewers-despises-television-and-wants-to-see-it-die-2011-12


tv death

We recently polled Business Insider readers on their attitudes to paying for cable and satellite TV, and we asked for your comments on the future of television itself.

The survey was prompted by the news that a generation of “cord-nevers” and “cord-cutters” is forming — young people who don’t want to pay for cable TV because their laptops and mobile devices provide plenty of free video.

By late Friday, 910 votes had been cast and the result was overwhelming:

  • One third of you (307) said you had already given up pay TV and were not going back.
  • Only 94 voters said they paid for basic cable.
  • Another 103 owned up to buying premium TV service.
  • Those low numbers were equalled by the 95 voters who said they could not ever imagine watching regular TV again.

Here are the full results:

tv death

(The live poll is still open, incidentally.) Obviously, the poll is biased: It’s a self-selecting audience of people who are already getting their news from the web.

Meet the “cord-haters”

Having said that, it indicates that “cord-nevers” may not be the TV industry’s main problem. Rather, judging by the comment boards underneath both the poll and the original story about the death of TV, it is the “cord-haters”: People who actively despise traditional television with its clutter of irrelevant advertising and brainless programming. They are overjoyed that the web now offers an alternative way to watch shows and movies at a fraction of the cost.

The Credit Suisse report identified new technology as the culprit that is now eating TV’s business. But as far as B.I. readers are concerned, it’s not just about the ease of watching movies on an iPad. Rather, it’s that they find TV to be of such low quality that they just don’t want to watch any more of it. Only now has new technology allowed them to watch shows and movies without all of TV’s baggage, such as paying for 500 channels when you really only watch about 10.

Here are some comments from the cord-haters (more here):

Steven: The thing I hate about TV is you only watch a couple stations 99% of the time, but you pay for 150+ stations.

dargoola: This year I cut most of the digital premium channels with on demand add-ons because I never have time to watch them.

There’s a core Of TV channels I watch but it’s shrinking. I’m getting more of my news from the Internet, i blog a lot, and spend more time socially on the net. But TV is still it for the pure pleasure of vegging out and being entertained.

realchuck: I’ve stopped paying some 5 years ago. I installed a ‘seedbox’ with a friendly 3rd-world country hosting provider and just leech torrents (automatically). It costs me some $50 per month including unlimited traffic. So I get TV-shows on the next day, auto-downloaded, and any blu-ray movie – also on the next day. I don’t have to respect any delays imposed by the assholes in the industry.

flubber: TV will fail because of the parent companies and advertisers. How many infomercials do we need?
How many times do they need to cut to commercial during a football game? Quite frankly I do not watch a lot of TV anymore because the amount of real content being aired is a joke and the amount of commercials is just downright insulting. I download everything or watch it on the net.

Dean Wormer: The traditional TV folks are stuck. But they think this is about Netflix, Hulu etc. It’s not. Their product stinks. It’s been this way for years and its getting worse. Hulu is just methadone to get you off the crack pipe.

Krissy: Let us be real here, most regular network TV on now is pure unadulterated shite.

iWonder: Cable isn’t what it used to be. I had cable primarily for channels like Discovery, Science and History but now it seems those networks are being overrun by the same trash programming that took over the big networks a decade ago. Cable isn’t worth it now, 150+ channels and nothing worth watching, that’s why I’m done with it.

jasno: I abandoned broadcast TV because of the incessant commercials. Even on the discovery channel it’s too much. Worse, the commercials are pretty much never for anything that I might possibly buy. For example, I am never going to buy a Chevy Silverado pickup, or any truck, but I have been subjected to about 97,391 commercials for pickup trucks.

Some readers defended TV, saying it still played a useful role in their lives:

rusty syringe: Gave it up for awhile but came back this year. Direct TV’s free Sunday Ticket offer was to good to pass up.

As with most guys I know, if it weren’t for ESPN, NFL, and NBA I wouldn’t get cable. Sports is all I watch on TV.

Frank Castle: I’ve tried all the streaming services and the image quality is crap. With Comcast I have a crystal clear 1080 signal with Dolby digital sound. I have no desire to gather everyone around the laptop to view a show. All these services also are geared to the solo viewer. What do you do when Mom wants to watch HGTV, I’m watching a game, the kids have on disney channel. Your telling me running all those sevices seperately is going to be cheaper then another cable connection?

SEE ALSO: The Facebook Advertising Hall Of Fame: Here’s Who Is Nailing It On The Social Network

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Monday, December 12th, 2011 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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