objective

Branding Forecast to Match Direct Response in Digital Ad Spend

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/direct/branding-forecast-to-match-direct-response-in-digital-ad-spend-36664/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

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Indeed, brand advertising spending growth will outpace direct response in each year of the forecast, with increases of 18.1% and 11.2% respectively this year and 10.5% and 3.6% respectively in 2017.

The eMarketer forecast aligns with recent survey results from Vizu and the CMO Council, in which 61% of respondents said they are re-allocating budgets away from direct response to brand advertising initiatives. That same survey revealed that 70% of brand marketers expect to up their spending on social media advertising, while similar proportions will increase mobile (69%) and video (64%) ad spend. Interestingly, though, a more recent survey of global marketers (predominantly in Europe) found that few count branding as their top objective for social media ad buys, leaning instead to lead generation. That was a different result than found by Vizu and AdAge in separate surveys indicating branding to be the clear-cut objective for social ad campaigns.

The line between branding and direct-response campaigns tends to be blurring, says eMarketer, which may explain some of the discrepancies in social advertising goals. In any case, the researcher attributes the greater focus on branding to digital’s growing presence in consumers’ media time. That same explanation was given by Vizu and the CMO Council in their survey, with the researchers suggesting that brand marketers and their ad dollars will follow consumers to their chosen digital media channels, whether they be online, tablet, mobile, or connected TV.

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Sunday, September 15th, 2013 news No Comments

Global Marketers Say Lead Gen A Bigger Social Ad Objective Than Branding

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/direct/global-marketers-say-lead-gen-a-bigger-social-ad-objective-than-branding-36489/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

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The results mark somewhat of a departure from recent studies which have suggested more of a branding focus from social media ad buys (see here and here).

Lead generation is also the primary objective for a plurality (37%) of in-house marketers engaged in online display advertising, although direct online sales (26%) is their second-biggest objective. When it comes to paid search, direct online sales (40%) counts as the primary objective, followed closely by lead gen (38%).

The bulk of social advertising dollars are being spent on Facebook, per the report. Client-side respondents indicate that they’re allocating 41% of their social ad budgets to the platform, compared to 18% for LinkedIn, 17% for Twitter, and 24% to other networks. Agency respondents estimate that an even greater 53% of their clients’ social ad budgets are being directed to Facebook.

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Monday, September 9th, 2013 news No Comments

Treehouse Is an Elegant, Focused Online Learning Resource for Aspiring Designers and Developers [Teach Yourself]

Source: http://lifehacker.com/5857764/treehouse-teaches-you-development-and-design-elegantly-and-for-free

Treehouse Is an Elegant, Focused Online Learning Resource for Aspiring Designers and DevelopersIf you’re looking to learn some new development or design skills, Treehouse can teach your the core knowledge you need. The site offers a focused look at the basics of object oriented programming, the principals of good design, and how to make an iPhone app.

The lessons take you through your topic of choice in video form, explain everything in clear and precise terms, and award you badges as you make your way through. If you’re willing to pay extra, you’ll also get access to project videos which will take you through the process of creating real-world projects from start to finish. I’ve been meaning to improve my pathetic Objective C skills and learn to develop for iOS but had yet to come across a set of lessons I really liked. After watching a few at Treehouse I was pretty hooked. If you’ve been looking to pick up one of these valuable skills as well, their lessons are definitely worth checking out.

Note: I made an error and initially thought Treehouse was free. First, sorry for the misleading information! Second, we still think it’s pretty nice. Pricing is $25/month for basic access and $49/month for premium. (More information here.) That’s about on par with our other favorite, Lynda. Lynda offers you far more topics but Treehouse has a nice focus (and, at the moment, a more up-to-date iOS course). Sorry again that I completely missed the cost of the service, but it’s still pretty cool and worth a look if it’s within your budget.

Treehouse


You can follow Adam Dachis, the author of this post, on Twitter, Google+, and Facebook.  Twitter’s the best way to contact him, too.


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Wednesday, November 9th, 2011 news No Comments

Why your brand MUST have a presence on social networks

At first glance, I said false when I read “Brand Presence on Social Networks Trusted Almost As Much As Peer Advice” — but when I looked more closely, it read “most credible source for information about a brand.”  This is significant because a “brand itself” SHOULD be the most credible source of accurate and up-to-date information. Even consumers are not always the best source or always have the latest information. And further notice that “a marketer” is next to the last on the bottom. Consumers want accurate and up to date info but they do not want to be sold to.

Consumers are good for “subjective” input on the quality and value of a brand’s products or services. A brand must be responsible for the accuracy of its own objective information. Formerly a brand’s own website was the best place to house objective information such as technical specs, nutrition information, etc. While third party sites like reviews sites are the best place to house subjective information like customer reviews, etc. Today, since most customers frequent social networks and seldom visit brand’s websites (they never did much anyway) the place to put objective information is on brand pages on social networks. Note that this does not mean a marketing page designed to “sell.” It means place “credible information about a brand.”

Brands Vie for Credibility on Social Networks

APRIL 2, 2010

Asked what source was most believable when it came to information found about brands on social networking sites, Internet users were most likely to favor their peers. But “the brand itself” came in a close second, far ahead of journalists, considered traditionally to be an objective source. Notably, users were much less trusting of marketers—a separate response from brands—and didn’t put much faith in a brand’s competitors either.

source: http://www.emarketer.com/Article.aspx?R=1007608

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Monday, April 5th, 2010 Branding, social networks 1 Comment

The new role of the digital agency

The new digital landscape and modern consumers are dramatically different

The new “digital landscape” is dramatically different from the environment into which TV, print, and radio ads were launched no more than two decades ago. Even today’s Web 2.0 environment is different than the Web 1.0 environment of a decade ago. As the Internet led to the more facile accumulation and dissemination of information and as social networks brought even mainstream consumers online, the power of consumers has increased significantly relative to advertisers. For example, they will search for information when they want it and ignore all other forms of interruption media pushed at them. They will look for independent and objective reviews of products or services and distrust brand messages put out by advertisers touting their own virtues. And they will rely on the actions of the community to help them filter and prioritize the best “stuff” from the ocean of available content.

Audience fragmentation caused by the proliferation of niche cable channels (e.g. the fly fishing channel) and abundant online video channels means that “mass media” is not so

“mass” any more — there are no longer massive audiences tuned into a single television

program at the same time. “Media” is now two-way or many-to-many — i.e. consumers tend to talk amongst themselves. But many advertisers and their agencies still rely heavily on one-way tactics – pushing a carefully crafted message out at target customers.


Globalization, information proliferation, and socialization have irreversibly changed industries

Other macro forces are also re-shaping the industries, in particular the advertising, marketing, and communications industries.

Globalization means that, for example, coding can be outsourced to India, graphic design to Australia, or television production to Asia, all at a fraction of the cost of “in-house” resources. The wide availability of tools like online photo editing tools (picnic.com), video editing sites (motionbox.com), and even high-end 3D and special effects software (Blender.org) — all of which are open source and free — fuel the perception that such digital capabilities and services should be lower cost, if not free. These trends mean that agencies whose revenues were derived from these services are facing constant downward pricing pressure.

The proliferation of information has also irreversibly changed the perceptions, behaviors, and habits of consumers. The abundance of information online conditions users to search for information and form their own opinions through research. They also expect more detailed information than can be typically delivered through TV, print, or radio ads — e.g. they want to see the product brochure online, do price comparison shopping across dozens of retailers, and read peer and expert reviews before buying. And they will do the above on their own time (e.g. planning a family cruise vacation at 1 am when the kids are asleep), which destroys the concept of targeting using day-part or show content.

The socialization of consumers online means that the conversations that used to happen among a few people around the watercooler are now happening online for all to see. The collective complaints or praises of products and services now become inputs to many other users doing research online before their next purchase. Furthermore not only is the spread of information much faster online, but the impact could also be dramatically larger —  for example, 1) by the end of opening weekend, hundreds of user reviews of a movie can immediately determine its fate — a mega hit or a “straight-to-DVD” movie, and 2) the action of a single person who found an unsavory clause in AT&T’s Wireless’ “fine print” and posted it online caused such a community uproar that AT&T made a public statement that it would be removed.


Traditional agencies rely on old business models (and other challenges for traditional agencies)

Despite the new landscape conditions of no more mass media and consumers doing their own research online, many advertisers are still doing traditional advertising. And many of their agencies are still relying on old business models (agency of record) and being paid for production. Creative ideas are still being given away for free during the pitch process; if the pitch is won the agency then gets to bill against production of assets. But freely available tools or production and abundant lower cost producers are causing clients to question costs.

Other challenges plague traditional agencies. All clients want to “go digital;” but digital is seen to be a “bolt on” capability among big agencies and smaller agencies are perceived to be more digitally savvy. Further, “clients find it hard to know how much digital stuff costs,” says Peter Cowie, Managing Partner of Oyster Catchers, a search consultancy based in London. “Many clients are using in house capability to save costs and retain control.” Cowie continues, “many clients are deeply insecure about digital marketing” partly because of its novelty, but also, practically because of the wide array of new disciplines, including for example, social networking, mobile, gaming, search, analytics, user interface, Flash, AJAX, e-commerce, online ad networks and media buying, etc.


The new digital agency plays the role of a strategic advisor and subject matter expert

So what is the role an agency can and should play in this new landscape? We believe, the role of a strategic advisor to calm clients’ insecurities and ensure a cogent and smooth incorporation of digital. Smaller agencies that grew up in digital may not have the expertise in traditional disciplines nor a global footprint and enough staff to handle large global clients. However, large traditional agencies, with a few key changes to business model, organizational structure, and internal processes will be able to guide clients through the shift towards digital, by changing the marketing mix and ensuring that all channels are integrated, working together, and reinforcing to each other.

These changes may include 1) managing a network of independent specialists (who serve on SWAT teams for client projects) instead of in-house FTEs, to account for the wide variety of new skills and disciplines 2) shifting away from the business model of being paid for production to being paid for managing a network of geographically disperse low-cost providers, and 3) providing thought leadership as subject matter expert in digital disciplines, strategies, and tactics.

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Wednesday, October 29th, 2008 digital No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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