processor

first direct comparison between phone processor and desktop processor

Benchmarks show Samsung's Exynos 5 processor is a beast with Linux 

SOURCE: Phoronix

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Thursday, November 29th, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5949150/the-single-biggest-question-about-the-ipad-mini

The Single Biggest Question About the iPad MiniLike the iPhone 5 before it, the unannounced iPad Mini has—through leaks and logic—made itself essentially a known quantity. Let’s assume for a second that we know what it looks like, how big it is, and what guts will power it. It’s a safe assumption.

With just a few weeks until a rumored launch, we have a jigsaw puzzle device that’s missing just one piece: price. And how Apple fills that in will have huge repercussions for the iPad Mini—and the company itself.

This is what we can say with some certainty about Apple’s tiny tablet: It will look somewhere between a large iPhone and a small iPad, will have a 7.85-inch display that’s not quite retina, will share guts with the iPad 2 and iPod touch, and will be announced sometime in the next several weeks. It will likely come in black, anodized aluminum, and possibly white. There could very well be a 3G version.

That makes price the only real question left. It’s also the one Apple’s going to have the hardest time answering.

A Premium Blend

This should be easy. After all, unlike the iPad—which established the 10-inch tablet market to Apple’s devastating advantage—there are already a host of 7-inchers in the world. There have been for some time; long enough, at least, to cement consumer expectations of what a 7-inch tablet should cost. And that amount is between $200 and $250.

So, no problem! Let’s say the iPad Mini starts at 16GB (reasonable, since all the other iPads do). That would put it up against the equivalent $200 Kindle Fire HD, the $230 Nook HD, and the $250 Nexus 7. Assuming Apple doesn’t mind sitting on top of the pricing totem pole, $300 makes perfect sense. Done.

But let’s take one more look at those devices. The Nook HD has the best display of any 7-inch tablet, and an OMAP processor that outclocks the Kindle Fire, and the Nexus 7 (and iPad Mini’s rumored A5). In fact, at that $300 price point you could score a 32GB, 9-inch Nook HD+. Similarly, the Nexus 7 can match any tablet on design, has a blazing Tegra 3 processor and 1GB of RAM muscling a silky Android Jelly Bean platform, a near-retina display, and the full might of the Google Play store behind it. In both cases, at $300 Apple would be asking people to pay significantly more for a product that offers, on many fronts, less.

Then there’s the Kindle Fire HD, from a company with nearly as much brand recognition as Apple, a content ecosystem that beats the crap out of iTunes, a retina display. All for—again, hypothetically—a hundred bucks cheaper. In fact, for $300 you can get 9-inch, retina display Kindle Fire HD, a free month of Amazon Prime, and (in most places, still) not pay taxes on any of it. Buying that over a smaller, less equipped iPad Mini may not be a no-brainer. But it’s closer to one than Apple should be comfortable with.

So why not go cheaper? It’s not that Apple can’t afford to. It’s that it doesn’t appear to want to.

The iPod Precedent

One of the not-so-secrets to Apple’s retail success is that it keeps things like pricing so simple you don’t have to give it much thought. Nearly every product in the Apple Store—the Shuffle, the nano, and the 3G iPads being the exceptions—costs a multiple of $100. Want the slightly better version of something? That’ll be a Benjamin.

It’s such an established system, in fact, that Apple may have priced itself into a corner. An iPad Mini would fall squarely between two devices: the iPod touch and the iPad. It’s expected to share the same processor with both, and will roughly split the difference in size. The 32GB iPod touch—the smallest available model—costs $300. The entry-level 16GB iPad 2 costs $400. It’s nearly impossible to imagine the iPad Mini costing less than the former and more than the latter. It would be confusing, and Apple hates confusion.

The Single Biggest Question About the iPad MiniBut $300 for a 16GB iPad Mini would be the sweet spot, wouldn’t it? Especially given that $100 increment fetish. Start with the $300 32GB iPod touch, add size (+$100), subtract storage (-$100), end up at $300. Start with the $400 iPad 2, subtract size (-$100), keep everything else the same, end up at $300. It also happens to fill in the pricing pattern every iProduct has marched to since forever (left, via Ryan Jones).

When Apple refreshed its iPod touch line-up just last month, it could’ve easily set a lower price in anticipation of the incoming iPad Mini. But it didn’t. And that’s worrisome.

Regression to the Mean

Not too long ago, people happily paid an Apple premium. You’d spend more for the same basic product because you trusted the brand and appreciated the aesthetic. Apple made a lot less money back then.

Now, though? Look around. Intel had to pay out $300 million to ultrabook OEMs to keep up with MacBook Air pricing. It’s commonplace for top-shelf Android handsets to start at $300 on contract; the iPhone still comes in at (a heavily subsidized) $200.

And then there’s the iPad. It’s easy to forget now, but one of the most remarkable things about the original Apple tablet was its price. It was cheap, for what it was, a budget Adonis forged by Tim Cook’s supply chain heroics and Apple Store retail efficiency. It took a year for Apple’s competitors to produce a reasonably decent 10-inch tablet at $500, and another to drive the price down to $400. And still no one buys them.

People buy the Kindle Fire, though. By the millions. The small tablet market is mature and competitive in a way that the 10-inch market—outside of the iPad itself—has never been. The Toshiba Thrive is Glass Joe; the Nexus 7 is Mr. Sandman. And it’s way cheaper than $300.

How Apple prices the iPad Mini matters beyond just the number of units it sells. If it’s less than $300, CEO Tim Cook has keyed into the threat that Amazon and Google pose to its handheld computing empire. And he’ll crush them. If not? Then it’s another sign—along with Maps, along with that $30 dock connector adapter—that the old Apple hubris might be sneaking back in. The kind that dominated back when Apple was cool and niche, not the most successful business in the world.

So maybe the biggest question about the iPad Mini isn’t really price after all. Maybe it’s: What kind of company does Apple want to be?

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Friday, October 5th, 2012 news No Comments

Qualcomm confirms its role in LG superphone with quad-core Snapdragon S4

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/08/22/qualcomm-confirms-lg-superphone-with-quad-core-snapdragon-s4/

Qualcomm confirms its role in LG superphone with quadcore Snapdragon S4

There’s nothing like jumping the gun to announce your involvement with a phone that technically doesn’t exist, but we’ve gotta say, we love Qualcomm for doing it. The company has just revealed to us its role in the production of a smartphone from LG that’ll feature quad-core Snapdragon S4 internals, and if it performs anything like recent benchmarks suggest, you’d best hold onto your hats. For a little backstory, rumors are currently circulating that LG is producing a smartphone of epic proportions that’s known as the Optimus G, which is said to wield a quad-core processor, a 4.7-inch IPS True HD display, 2GB of RAM and a 13-megapixel camera. Whether it’s related to this announcement is anyone’s guess, but you’ll be forgiven for salivating at the prospect. Fortunately, you won’t have long to find out the true home of the quad-core Snapdragon S4, as Qualcomm has also revealed that LG plans to release its next superphone for commercial availability this September in South Korea, with other territories to follow.

Update: AnandTech has gotten word from Qualcomm that the LG device in question will pack an MDM9615 LTE baseband chip as well.

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Qualcomm confirms its role in ! LG super phone with quad-core Snapdragon S4 originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 22 Aug 2012 20:54:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Thursday, August 23rd, 2012 news No Comments

Dell Vostro line gets Ivy Bridge CPUs, optional 4G LTE

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/12/dell-vostro-line-ivy-bridge-cpus-optional-4g-lte/

Dell Vostro line gets Ivy Bridge CPUs, optional 4G LTE

Dell’s Vostro line of entry-level business notebooks is next up to receive the good ‘ol Ivy Bridge update. Today the company is announcing the Vostro 3360, 3460 and 3560 laptops, in 13-inch, 14-inch and 15-inch sizes, respectively. All models will be configurable with either second- (Core i3) or third-gen (Core i5 or Core i7) Intel CPUs along with several graphics options and up to 8GB of RAM. And let’s not forget those business features: fingerprint readers, file and folder encryption and security software are available on all three models. The Vostro 3360 and 3460 will also offer optional 4G LTE mobile broadband.

Getting more specific, the $649 Vostro 3360 measures 0.76 inches thick, weighs 3.67 pounds and comes standard with a 320GB hard drive spinning at 7,200RPM (a 750GB configuration and an optional 32GB SSD are also available). Starting at $599, the 4.92-pound Vostro 3460 comes with the same processor options and is available with NVIDIA GeForce GT 630M graphics and up to a 7,200RPM, 750GB hard drive coupled with a 32GB SSD. Unlike the 3360, the 14-incher comes with a backlit keyboard and includes an optical drive. Lastly, there’s the 15-inch, 5.75-pound Vostro 3560, which can be configured with AMD Radeon HD 7670M graphics and a 1920 x 1080 display (you get the same storage options as the 3460, along with the same backlit keyboard and optical drive). The Vostro 3560 is currently on sale for $599 on Dell’s website, while the 3360 and 3460 will be available on June 21st. Head past the break for more photos and the full press release.

Gallery: Dell Vostro 3360, 3460 and 3650 hands-on

Continue reading Dell Vostro line gets Ivy Bridge CPUs, optional 4G LTE

Dell Vostro line gets Ivy Bridge CPUs, optional 4G LTE originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 12 Jun 2012 09:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Tuesday, June 12th, 2012 news No Comments

Dell Vostro line gets Ivy Bridge CPUs, optional 4G LTE

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/12/dell-vostro-line-ivy-bridge-cpus-optional-4g-lte/

Dell Vostro line gets Ivy Bridge CPUs, optional 4G LTE

Dell’s Vostro line of entry-level business notebooks is next up to receive the good ‘ol Ivy Bridge update. Today the company is announcing the Vostro 3360, 3460 and 3560 laptops, in 13-inch, 14-inch and 15-inch sizes, respectively. All models will be configurable with either second- (Core i3) or third-gen (Core i5 or Core i7) Intel CPUs along with several graphics options and up to 8GB of RAM. And let’s not forget those business features: fingerprint readers, file and folder encryption and security software are available on all three models. The Vostro 3360 and 3460 will also offer optional 4G LTE mobile broadband.

Getting more specific, the $649 Vostro 3360 measures 0.76 inches thick, weighs 3.67 pounds and comes standard with a 320GB hard drive spinning at 7,200RPM (a 750GB configuration and an optional 32GB SSD are also available). Starting at $599, the 4.92-pound Vostro 3460 comes with the same processor options and is available with NVIDIA GeForce GT 630M graphics and up to a 7,200RPM, 750GB hard drive coupled with a 32GB SSD. Unlike the 3360, the 14-incher comes with a backlit keyboard and includes an optical drive. Lastly, there’s the 15-inch, 5.75-pound Vostro 3560, which can be configured with AMD Radeon HD 7670M graphics and a 1920 x 1080 display (you get the same storage options as the 3460, along with the same backlit keyboard and optical drive). The Vostro 3560 is currently on sale for $599 on Dell’s website, while the 3360 and 3460 will be available on June 21st. Head past the break for more photos and the full press release.

Gallery: Dell Vostro 3360, 3460 and 3650 hands-on

Continue reading Dell Vostro line gets Ivy Bridge CPUs, optional 4G LTE

Dell Vostro line gets Ivy Bridge CPUs, optional 4G LTE originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 12 Jun 2012 09:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Tuesday, June 12th, 2012 news No Comments

Enthusiast digital cameras – super high-speed, high dynamic range, foveon direct capture

Casio superfast camera 1,200 frames per second

casio one is to capture slo mo (bullet blasting through apple)

Casio High-Speed Exilim EX-FC100 9 MP Digital Camera with 5x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom and 2.7-inch LCD (Black)


Sigma DP2 foveon 14 megapixel direct capture camera

foveon is to capture intricate fabric detail (every pixel has R, G, and B captured, not extrapolated)

Sigma DP2 14MP FOVEON CMOS Sensor Digital Camera with 2.5 Inch TFT LCD


Fuji super high dynamic range camera

Fuji’s CMOS sensor captures 2 shots in one – one low light and one high light, and smashes them together to

achieve a high dynamic range shot (previously you’d have to bracket the same shot yourself, and smash the shots together with software)

Fujifilm FinePix F200EXR 12MP Super CCD Digital Camera with 5x Wide Angle Dual Image Stabilized Optical Zoom

Ricoh GR Digital III

The wide-angle 28 mm/F1.9 GR Lens is all new, while the high-sensitivity 10-megapixel CCD and the GR Engine III image processor are likely evolutionary steps from the previous generation.

Nikon Coolpix S1000pj 12.1MP Digital Camera with Built-in Projector

Micro four thirds camera with interchangeable lenses

Olympus EP-1


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Thursday, July 30th, 2009 digital 2 Comments

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