product category

Mobile In-Store Research Frequency Seen Increasing Alongside Price Point

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/topics/e-commerce/mobile-in-store-research-frequency-seen-increasing-alongside-price-point-36700/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

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Similarly, while 36% regularly conduct in-store searches when looking at products priced at less than $50, 62% do so for products priced at $250 and up.

Besides price point, the study also finds that the frequency of in-store searches ranges significantly by product category. Respondents most commonly conduct in-store mobile searches for electronics and appliances (83% doing so almost always or frequently) and books and music (67%), with fewer do so for automotive (52%) and food and beverage (50%) products.

There are some intriguing results in the study’s section regarding the discount rates at which M-shoppers would consider buying online (these responses limited to US respondents). Almost 6 in 10 respondents would consider buying online if they could get a 10% discount on a $500 item. But a 10% discount on a $200 item would only persuade 50% to consider buying online, while swaying only 28% of those shopping for a $50 item. These results align with previous research from parago, which found that for an equal discount rate, consumers would be about 20% more likely to switch to an alternative online option (in this case Amazon) that provides larger dollar savings. The results from that study suggested that the focus on dollar savings over discounts could be attributable to a calculus regarding shipping costs.

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Tuesday, September 17th, 2013 news No Comments

drag2share: Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest

source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/businessinsider/~3/yPhAFj6cXYo/facebook-twitter-and-pinterest-drive-as-much-in-store-purchasing-as-online-purchasing-2013-6

adidas originals facebook page

Networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest drive as much in store purchasing as online purchasing, but affect purchasing behaviour in sharply different ways, research from Vision Critical has found.

This research gathered more than 5,900 responses over a series of four online surveys to determine how social media influences the consumer’s path to purchase.

It was discovered that Facebook was best for motivating consumers to make purchases offline and online; while one in three individuals who buy items they have pinned or liked on Pinterest had not thought of making that purchase until they found the item on Pinterest.

On Twitter and Facebook, technology is the product category: 34% of Twitter purchases and 25 per cent of Facebook purchases were made after sharing or favouriting a technology item.


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Thursday, June 27th, 2013 news No Comments

This Chart Shows Why Best Buy Should Be Particularly Terrified Of ‘Showrooming’ (BBY)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/showroomings-consumer-electronics-best-buy-2012-6

Brick-and-mortar retailers are scared of being reduced to a “showroom” where shoppers go to try items out before going online to make the final purchase. Some feel that the showrooming panic is totally overblown, but there’s one segment of retailers that’s particularly affected.

Consumer electronics retailers are experiencing more showrooming than any other category by far.

More than 6-in-10 customers who have used showrooming bought an item online in that category, according to a slide from comScore’s “State of the Internet in Q1 2012” presentation by senior director Tiffany Walker. No other product category came anywhere close to that number.

As the biggest consumer electronics big box store out there, Best Buy needs to do something about this fast.

Acting CEO Mike Mikan said as much at his company’s recent annual meeting. “[The customer’s] needs have changed,” he said. “We, unfortunately, have not.”

Here’s the chart:

consumer electronics chart

NOW SEE: The Secrets Of The Apple Store’s Success >

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Monday, June 25th, 2012 news No Comments

Apple, The iPhone Company (AAPL)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-apple-the-iphone-company-2012-1


Here’s a breakdown of Apple’s sales by product category. It is an iPhone company now, with 53% of sales coming from the smartphone.

chart of the day, apple quarterly revenue by product, jan 24 2012

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Tuesday, January 24th, 2012 news No Comments

The iPad Is Not Expensive—for an Apple Product, Anyway [Ipad]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5504777/fact-the-ipad-is-not-expensivefor-an-apple-product-anyway

Fact: The iPad Is Not Expensive—for an Apple Product, AnywayThe iPad is not expensive. In fact, compared to other products through Apple’s history, it’s very cheap. It’s not opinion. It’s fact, as you can see in this comparative graphic, covering every major Apple device launch since the Apple I.

When you adjust the prices to 2010 dollars, the iPad is the second-cheapest major device ever sold by Apple. And when I say major I mean a device that was supposed to change the industry or create a new product category, like the Apple II, the Mac, the PowerBook 100, the Newton Message Pad, the iPhone, or the iPod, the only device cheaper than the iPad. [Vouchercodes]

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Monday, March 29th, 2010 charts No Comments

Even Major Sites are Not Yet Benefiting From the Full Power of Search

@glenngabe‘s post on  FaceYahoogle – The Impact of Facebook, Yahoo, and Google on Website Traffic inspired me to also look at the search terms driving traffic.  Most sites, even major ones have their own brand terms driving traffic. This is OK, but it is taking significantly less advantage of the full power of search.A more ideal scenario for sites is that they have a large number of non-brand terms driving traffic — i.e. the keywords they want to be known for are driving traffic to them.  The premise is that if the user already knew the brand or brand name, it would be redundant for the advertiser to spend awareness ad dollars on them. The advertiser wants to get users to their site who do not already know their brand name.  This is especially true for pharma drug websites, as you will see in the following examples.

GENERAL SITES

These sites have such a diverse set of products, services, or topics, we don’t expect the top search terms driving traffic to be anything other than their brand terms.  But they should have a long tail of thousands of keywords driving traffic (and they are, in the following examples).

NYTimes.com

nytimes

LinkedIn.com

linkedin

Weather.com

weather

CATEGORY SPECIFIC SITES

These sites focus on specific product categories, so one would expect that they should have keywords around their product category driving traffic — e.g. clothing, chocolate, wine, etc.  But as you can see, most don’t and the total number of keywords driving traffic could be larger than it is now (implying more long tail keywords).

JCrew.com – clothing

jcrew

Apple.com – computers, consumer electronics, iPod, music

apple

Godiva.com – chocolate

godiva

AnnTaylor.com – clothing, women’s

anntaylor

SINGLE NICHE SITES

Such sites should be all over search terms that surround the topic areas that they want to be known for. But as you see from the analytics, most don’t. Instead, the top terms driving traffic are their own brand name. Again, if the user already knew the brand, additional advertising would be wasted on them. The sites need to make efforts to “own” additional keywords (or at least “show up at the party”) so people who don’t know the brand name might still have a chance finding them when they type in other keywords surrounding the specific niche.

Sutent (Pfizer) – cancer drug

sutent

Nucynta (J0hnson & Johnson) – pain drug

nucynta

Spiriva (Boehringer Ingelheim, Pfizer) – COPD drug

NOTE: This is the best of the bunch of drug sites.  COPD, the disease area they want to be known for, does actually show up in the first 5 search terms driving traffic, along with emphysema and their product name handihaler. Also, notice they have nearly 10 times the number of keywords driving traffic compared to the other 2 drugs cited (65 vs 7 or 8 )

spiriva

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Sunday, December 6th, 2009 digital 1 Comment

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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