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Chrome OS on the cheap, but at what cost?

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/11/26/acer-c7-chromebook-review/

Acer C7 Chromebook review: Chrome OS on the cheap, but at what cost?

It’s been just over a month since Google unveiled its gorgeous and affordable $249 Samsung Chromebook only to surprise us days later with an even cheaper system, the $199 Acer C7 Chromebook. At first glance, these two laptops are very similar, both in purpose (cloud-based computing on a budget) and in specs (11.6-inch display, dual-core CPU, 2GB of RAM), but there are significant differences under the hood. Samsung’s offering achieves its svelte form factor, 6.5-hour battery life and attractive price via a fully integrated and fanless ARM-based design while Acer takes a more conservative approach — cramming standard off-the-shelf components like a 2.5-inch hard drive, small-outline memory module, mini-PCIe WiFi card, and Intel Celeron processor into a traditional netbook-like chassis. Does being $50 cheaper make up for the C7’s lack of sex appeal and short 4-hour battery life? What other compromises in performance and build quality (if any) were made to achieve this lower cost? Most importantly, which budget Chromebook is right for you? Find out after the break.

Gallery: Acer C7 Chromebook review

Continue reading Acer C7 Chromebook review: Chrome OS on the cheap, but at what cost?

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Monday, November 26th, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/vip/~3/m4BrOmW6wmI/sopas-back-from-the-dead-and-this-time-its-a-virus

SOPA's Back From the Dead and This Time It's a Virus If you thought SOPA was dead, well, you’d be mostly right. Its bloated corpse, however, has been resurrected by hacker puppeteers for the valiant purpose of scamming people out of their cash.

The new virus is a pretty standard piece of ransomware that claims to have locked down your computer and offers to unlock it for the nominal fee of $200, but this one waves around the SOPA name for a little extra scare. Anyone who remembers the name, but not that the bill never went through, might be a little concerned at the accusations of piracy. That said, it doesn’t take a genius to realize that the U.S. government probably wouldn’t be collecting fines in the form of euros via Western Union, like ever.

Fortunately this SOPA doesn’t threaten to destroy the Internet as we know it but rather just your private stash of files, illegal and otherwise and it’s an empty threat at that. If you know how to Google things the solution won’t cost you a cent. It’s just a shame all legislation can’t be manually removed. [TorrentFreak via Geekosystem]

SOPA's Back From the Dead and This Time It's a Virus

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Saturday, October 13th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5947614/the-canadian-government-accidentally-ran-a-bunch-of-ads-on-the-pirate-bay

The Canadian Government Accidentally Ran a Bunch of Ads on the Pirate Bay The Pirate Bay tends to be a website that national governments aren’t particularly fond of. That being the case, it’d be surprising if a national government ran ads on the site, advertising an Economic Action Plan, right? Canada did that, but not on purpose.

Banner ads for Canada’s Department of Finance’s Economic Action Plan started showing up on the site a few days ago, right next to ads for finding a Chinese bride, as shown by an image from the Ottawa Citizen. The ads were removed quickly, and the Department of Finance is blaming ad networks that were included in their media buy, specifically Yahoo!.

Yahoo! is in turn pointing a finger at Sympatico:

We have confirmed that Yahoo! was not responsible for the EAP ad showing up on The Pirate Bay. We have been able to trace the ad to Sympatico who were responsible for this ad’s appearance on the site, and they have been notified of the issue so they can take the appropriate actions.

Regardless of whose fault it actually was, the fact remains that for a while, the Pirate Bay had the pleasure of running a few government-purchased ads, and is enjoying the irony. According to TorrentFreak they’re even considering covering the site with unsolicited ads for the plan, for kicks. Though only the first run paid in real money, a second one would probably pay pretty well in smirks. [TorrentFreak via CNET]

Image by Arkadia/Shutterstock

The Canadian Government Accidentally Ran a Bunch of Ads on the Pirate Bay

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Sunday, September 30th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

The Days of Single Purpose Devices Are Numbered – Digital Cameras vs Cameraphones

With the proliferation of smartphones like the iPhone 3G, 3GS, 4, 4S and android devices, users now have digital cameras with them at all times. These digital cameras shoot 5 megapixel – 8 MP still shots and 720p or even 1080i HD video. Furthermore, their built in GPS automatically attaches geolocation information to images and videos.
As can be seen in the charts published by Flickr below, the Apple iPhone 4 has already shot past other major cameras from Nikon and Canon to be the most popular overall camera in the Flickr Community. With additional more detailed data, the Apple iPhone 4 (both 4 and 4S) has an average daily users count of 5,798 while the 2 most popular Canon point and shoot cameras (S95 and SD1100S) have a combined average daily users count of 980.  The iPhone has about 5x the activity.
Flickr Most Popular Cameras List – November 28, 2011.
2011-11-28 Flickr Most Popular Cameras.png
U.S. Smartphone Penetration

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Monday, November 28th, 2011 news No Comments

The problem with bad product names and what we can learn from it

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2011/11/11/editorial-the-problem-with-bad-product-names-and-what-we-can-le/

Product names generally fall into one of four different categories: good, safe, meaningless and bad. There may be better categories to group them in, but we’ll use these for the purpose of this editorial. In the first category I’d put something like Kindle, arguably one of the best new product names of the last ten years. iPhone and iPad, and their subsequent suffixed versions, are in the safe category. They’re perfectly fine names for a cellphone and a tablet, but they’re not as original or distinct as iMac or iPod were, which I’d consider good (iPod nano, shuffle and touch, on the other hand, are all safe names).

In the meaningless category are things like the MSI GT683DXR or ASUS XU6280, one of which I just made up. Some meaningless names can also be good in their simplicity — like the Nokia N9 or Nikon D3S — but they are still basically nothing more than differentiators. This is an acceptable option.

The names aren’t just bad — they’re noise.

In the bad category are the majority of smartphones released in the past few years. Rezound. Rhyme. Vivid. Epic. Sensation. Thrill. Skyrocket. Conquer. Triumph. Enlighten. Infuse. Prevail. Arrive. Can you name the company behind each phone? And those are just a few examples from this year. The names aren’t just bad — they’re noise. Some names might fall into a fifth, slightly murkier okay category, but there are certainly more phones (and, increasingly, tablets) in the bad category than any other, and I’d argue that’s a sign of a larger problem.

Continue reading Editorial: The problem with bad product names and what we can learn from it

Editorial: The problem with bad product names and what we can learn from it originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 11 Nov 2011 12:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Friday, November 11th, 2011 news No Comments

Fight!

Source: http://blog.compete.com/2011/10/26/tumblr-vs-wordpress-vs-blogger-fight/

Image from: Digital Genetics/Shutterstock

Tumblr has been in the news a lot recently because of their huge user numbers (there’s also been some question of whether or not they are a “bot fest” – but I’ll leave that for others to analyze.) Back in 2009, I compared Tumblr to Posterous – but since that time Tumblr has just pulled away. So much so that Posterous seems to have seen the writing on the wall and is now pivoting in a new direction. But I thought it would be good to take a look at how Tumblr fairs against the larger, more established blogging networks – namely WordPress.com and Blogger.com (now part of Google).

In terms of unique visitors, there isn’t any comparison – WordPress continues to dominate. Blogger has seen attrition in their numbers and has now fallen to third place (maybe the recent move to integrate Blogger into Google+ will help here).

In terms of visits, while Tumblr passed Blogger more than a year ago, it has now moved into a tie with WordPress.

But while Tumblr has many fewer unique visitors, those visitors are viewing a lot of pages. In fact, Tumblr is now completely dominating WordPress and Blogger in this area.

And in terms of attention, Tumblr is once again dominant.

I think the reason for the higher level of engagement on Tumblr (as measured in Page Views and Attention) probably comes down to a couple of key properties of Tumblr:

1. Tumblr functions more like a social network – thus people that use Tumblr tend to also subscribe/follow other Tumblrs – creating a strong network effect.
2. Cross-blog tagging – this brings a bit of Twitter to the blog network – allowing people to easily aggregate content, by tag, across blogs. This also, no doubt, aids in content discovery.
3. Tumblr reduces barriers to publishing content – unlike a traditional blog, where people feel the need to provide richer content, Tumblr tends to encourage simple posts.

What do you think? Are you using Tumblr now in place of other blogging networks? How do you decide which one to use, and for what purpose?


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Friday, October 28th, 2011 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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