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It’s Incredible How Much Reputation Matters For Brands

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/its-incredible-how-much-reputation-matters-for-brands-2012-12

In a time where trust in companies is at an all time low, it’s more valuable than ever. That’s not a moral or values based statement, it’s about the impact on the bottom line.

This chart, from a presentation at McKinsey’s Chief Marketing And Sales Officer Forum, shows how much investors and consumers reward an outstanding reputation: 

McKinsey

Despite the incredible value of reputation, according to McKinsey’s Betsy Holden, companies aren’t taking full advantage of their opportunities to increase it:

McKinsey reputation

One thing they can do to improve their reputation is bolster their social media presence. They can publish material related to the above, like information about transparency or environmental efforts, and can use it as a customer service tool. Being accessible and accountable increases trust.

That route may be particularly effective because social media is trusted by consumers at a rapidly increasing rate:

Social trust

NOW READ: McK insey Predicts The War For Talent Will Go Nuts By 2020

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Monday, December 17th, 2012 news No Comments

Google adds confirmation click to mobile ads to combat accidental activation

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/12/14/google-adds-confirmation-click-to-mobile-ads-to-combat-accidenta/


Google adds confirmation click to mobile ads to combat accidental activation

Smartphone owners have learned to cope with the extra power drain in-app advertising can cause, but accidentally launching a web browser? That’s a frustration that lasts forever. Google’s hoping to mitigate the pitfalls of clumsy thumbs, however, by introducing two-step click-through for mobile ads. Text banners served through AdMob will now display a humble blue arrow on their starboard side — clicking here takes the reader directly to the advertiser’s preferred destination; touching anywhere else expands widens the blue square to coax users into giving the ad a confirmation click, just in case they fumbled the advertisement by mistake. The team’s preliminary tests show that confirmed ad clicks sport a notably higher conversion rate, indicating that folks who clicked through the ad actually meant to. Google says solving what it calls the “fat finger problem” will be beneficial to the ecosystem as a whole. We prefer to think of our fingers as grand.

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Via: tp://www.androidpolice.com/2012/12/13/google-adds-two-step-verification-to-admob-ads-to-prevent-accidental-taps/“>Android Police

Source: Google Mobile Ads Blog

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Friday, December 14th, 2012 news No Comments

Olds Are Smoking Less

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/12-to-17-year-olds-are-smoking-less-2012-12

According to new data, youths are smoking less.

From Morgan Stanley’s David Adelman:

Although the causes are somewhat unclear, updated data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) highlights continued and substantial declines in the prevalence of US youth smoking. For example, among 12-17 year olds the incidence of cigarette smoking in the past month declined from 13.4% in 2000, to 8.4% in 2010, to 7.8% in 2011. In the 12-year data set, youth cigarette smoking has essentially declined every year, with most declines statistically significant (including 2011 vs. 2010).

Why has this been happening?

There are many reasons in our view why the secular rate of US cigarette volume decline has increased. We have written about this dynamic extensively, and the multiple – and somewhat related – principal factors likely include: (i) Reduced social acceptability; (ii) Increased prevalence of aggressive indoor smoking bans; (iii) Higher prices and higher excise taxes; (iv) Some shift to other tobacco products, including moist smokeless tobacco, as well as lower-taxed cigarette alternatives (e.g., “pipe-your-own”); (v) Ongoing ethnic shifts toward Asian- and Hispanic Americans, who have a far lower smoking prevalence (as well as substantially lower per capita cigarette consumption among those who smoke); and (vi) The multi-year substantial and continuing decline in youth smoking prevalence. Total youth consumption is modest, but like a python eating a pig, the impact of these demographic dynamics will be visible over an extended period of time as today’s young adult cohort ages. Nine-month year-to-date US cigarette consumption is down ~3%, despite only very modest net pricing.

Here’s a chart showing that trend.  But as Adelman notes, some may just be shifting from smoking to using smokeless tobacco products.

smoking trends

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Friday, December 7th, 2012 news No Comments

Obama’s Win Sent Instagram into Overdrive

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5958723/obamas-win-sent-instagram-into-overdrive

Obama's Win Sent Instagram into OverdriveIt’s not just Twitter that saw an astronomical boost from last night’s electoral dance—Instagram completely exploded as soon as Obama clinched presidential victory. In a huge way.

Within just six quick minutes—about as much time as it took for ecstatic Democrats to confirm on Twitter, jump up and down a little, pick up their phones, and pick a filter, the rate of photos uploaded to Instagram more than double to 2.1 the normal rate. If you’re a user of the app—and you probably are!—you no doubt got sepia peeks into a lot of living rooms and apartments around the country. The CNN close-up shot was a particular favorite. [Instagram]

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Wednesday, November 7th, 2012 news No Comments

Here’s The REAL Error Rate For ‘Fat Finger’ Clicks

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/error-rate-for-mobile-ad-fat-finger-clicks-2012-10

3d iphone

Up to 50% of the impressions served on a static mobile banner ads are from accidental clicks or “fat finger” taps, according to GoldSpot Media‘s “Fat Finger Report.”

Accidental clicks or “fat finger” clicks are taps on mobile banner ads that happen after less than two seconds of engagement. That is, if a user closes the app or website within two seconds of clicking the ad then it is considered accidental.

GoldSpot Media, a digital ad management platform for online and mobile advertising, aggregated this data by analyzing millions of static and rich media banner impressions for campaigns delivered in Q3 2012, which used the GoldSpot ad platform.

GoldSpot also found that “fat fingers” are three times more likely to accidentally tap static banner ads than they are to click rich media banners. This is because static banner ads “appear to be part of the content, and may be tapped by the user unintentionally.” Whereas the 3D and animated qualities of Rich media are easier to differentiate from the app or website content.

Accidental Clicks on Rich Media Banner Ads vs. Static Banner Ads

Accidental Clicks on Mobile Ads

 

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Friday, October 26th, 2012 news No Comments

The iPad Mini Is Going To Hammer Apple’s Regular iPad Business (AAPL)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/ipad-mini-will-hammer-current-ipad-2012-10

ipad mini renderApple’s forthcoming iPad Mini could take 15 per cent of sales away from the full-size iPad, according to analysts.

The new tablet is expected to be announced by Apple in California next Tuesday. Little is known about it except that it will probably have a 7.85-inch screen – slightly smaller than the current iPad’s 10-inch display.

Even with this lack of information analysts are predicting that Apple will sell around five million iPad Minis before Christmas, assuming rumours of a November 2 release date are correct.

Gene Munster, an analyst with Piper Jaffray, told AllThingsD : “We believe that the smaller iPad could cannibalize one million regular iPad units in December or a rate of cannibalization at 20 percent. [So] for every five million smaller iPads, you lose one million standard iPads.”

The report also quotes Bill Choi, an analyst with Janney Montgomery Scott, who believes the smaller iPad will cannibalise just 15 per cent of sales of the existing iPad.

Just as it did with its iPod range, which slowly expanded to cover a range of form factors, storage capacities and prices, Apple is likely to take the view that it is better to cannibalise its own products that to give a competitor the chance to do it.

At the moment,! anyone wanting a smaller, cheaper tablet is likely to go for Google’s Nexus 7, released in July, or Amazon’s Kindle Fire HD, which comes to Britain next week. The iPad Mini gives Apple the opportunity to target those customers.

Earlier this week Apple sent out invites to an October 23rd event in San Jose, California . Titled “We’ve got a little more to show you”, the invites give no hint as to what the company is set to announce. Rumours about a smaller iPad, however, have been doing the rounds for some time.

Alongside the iPad Mini, reports have suggested that Apple might unveil a 13-inch version of its ‘Retina’ MacBook Pro. The laptop with a very high resolution display is currently available on in 15-inch screen size.

Improvements to Apple’s iMac and Mac Mini computers are also expected but it is not known whether they will be shown off at next week’s event or released separately.

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Friday, October 19th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Mobile Accounts for 7 Percent Of The U.S. Digital Ad Market

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/businessinsider/~3/D4Haim_wFHI/chart-mobile-accounts-for-7-percent-of-the-us-digital-ad-market-2012-10

Mobile almost doubled its share of the U.S. digital ad market through the first six months of the year. According to IAB, U.S. mobile ad revenues were $1.2 billion in the first half of the year and 7 percent of total U.S. digital ad revenues, up from 4 percent a year prior.   

Total 2011 U.S. mobile ad revenues were $1.6 billion, according to IAB. Half-year revenues of $596 million were about 38 percent of the year-end total. Holding all else equal, if the U.S. market grew at the same rate this year, 2012 mobile ad revenues would be $3.2 billion.     

IAB screen shot

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Monday, October 15th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Fujitsu demos ad transmission technology, sends info from TV to handset via smartphone camera (video)

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/10/02/fujitsu-ad-transmission-smartphone-camera/

Fujitsu demos ad transmission technology, sends info from TV to handset via smartphone camera video

Another easter egg at Fujitsu’s CEATEC booth was a system for transmitting coupons, URLs and other digital information from a TV screen to a user’s smartphone. We’ll back up a bit: the data ends up on-screen in the first place thanks to information embedded in light flashing at various levels of brightness (the frame rate is too quick to be detected by the human eye). Theoretically, when a viewer is watching a commercial, they’ll see a prompt to hold up their phone’s camera to the screen, and doing so will bring up a corresponding coupon or website on their handset — it takes about two to three seconds here for the recognition. The embedded information covers the entire panel, so users don’t need to point their device at a particular section of the screen.

In Fujitsu’s demo, pointing a smartphone at the TV pulled up a website on the phone. It only took about a second for the URL to pop up on the device, and there was no noticeable flickering on the TV itself (essentially, the picture looks identical to what you’d see on a non-equipped model, since your eye won’t notice the code appearing at such a high frequency). The company says this technology works at a distance of up to two or three meters. Head past the break to take a look at the prototype in action.

Gallery: Fujitsu Video Data Transmission hands-on

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Continue reading Fujitsu demos ad transmission technology, sends info from TV to handset via smartphone camera (video)

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Fujitsu demos ad transmission technology, sends info from TV to handset via smartphone camera (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 02 Oct 2012 16:42:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012 news No Comments

Facebook outlines its ad targeting strategy on one handy page, presents a complex privacy picture

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/10/01/facebook-outlines-its-ad-targeting-strategy-on-one-handy-page/

Facebook privacy padlockTo say that Facebook has to tread lightly around privacy issues is an understatement, especially with a targeted ad push underway. Rather than navigate that minefield once more, the social network hopes to skip it entirely by posting an overview of how the ad system tracks habits while retaining our anonymity. For the most part, Facebook walks the fine line carefully. Its Facebook Exchange auction system relies on a unique, untraceable browser ID to target ads to specific people without ever getting their identity; both a mechanism targeting ads beyond Facebook and a Datalogix deal to track the ad conversion rate use anonymous e-mail address hashes that keep advertisers happy without making the addresses readable to prying eyes. The initiative sounds like it’s on the right course, although there’s caveats at work. Opting out of any Facebook Exchange ads requires tracking down individual ad providers, which isn’t likely to result in many of us leaving the ad revenue stream. Likewise, those who’d object even to the completely anonymous ad profiling don’t have a say in the matter. With those concerns in mind, it’s doubtful there will be many significant objections in the future — Facebook knows its advertising money train can only keep churning if its members are comfortable enough to come along for the ride.

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Facebook outlines its ad targeting strategy on one handy page, presents a complex privacy picture originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 01 Oct 2012 16:16:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5937981/ants-have-been-using-internet-algorithms-for-millions-of-years

Ants Have Been Using Internet Algorithms For Millions of Years Mankind has been able to accomplish some pretty impressive things, but some of them were around long before we figured them out. Ants, for instance, hunt for food in a way that’s basically the same as the Internet’s Transmission Control Protocol (TCP), and they were doing it long before the Internet was around.

It all has to do with how harvester ants gather their food. The same way that TCP will throttle data transmission if initial packets indicate little bandwidth, harvester ants will send less foragers out for food if the initial ones take too long to come back with grub.

From Stanford News:

[The] rate at which harvester ants – which forage for seeds as individuals – leave the nest to search for food corresponds to food availability.

A forager won’t return to the nest until it finds food. If seeds are plentiful, foragers return faster, and more ants leave the nest to forage. If, however, ants begin returning empty handed, the search is slowed, and perhaps called off.

And that’s not where the similarities end either. Ants also use TCP’s slow start technique, by sending out a wave of foragers (packets) to figure out the relative amount of food (bandwidth) before scaling their numbers up or down. Likewise, the same way a connection will time out if the source stops sending packets, the ants will stop sending out new foragers if none return for 20 minutes.

Balaji Prabhakar, one of the researchers behind the discovery, says that if this behavior had been uncovered pre-Internet, it might have influenced its design. Even so, this foraging process has been seriously time-tested, and there still might be things we can learn from it. In the meantime, who knows what other algorithms might already be out there, quietly waiting to be discovered. [Stanford News]

Image by S1001/Shutterstock

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Monday, August 27th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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