Resolution

How the Nexus 10 Stacks Up to the Competition

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5955853/how-the-nexus-10-stacks-up-to-the-competition

How the Nexus 10 Stacks Up to the CompetitionGoogle’s Nexus 10 tablet has arrived, designed to serve as Android’s flagship answer to the iPad and Surface. But is the thing worth its weight in salt? We compared the Nexus 10 to the other top new tablets to find out.

On the guts front, the Samsung-manufactured Nexus 10 is more or less in line with the other big name tablets, matching or exceeding the specs of the competition in most categories. Under the hood is a 1.7 GHz dual-core Exynos CPU with 2 Gigs of RAM and a 10.1-inch screen delivering a 298 ppi in a 2500×1600 resolution package.

While the CPU isn’t the quad-core Tegra 3 that the Surface has, it is the most pixel dense screen we’ve seen to date. However, if it is based around the Pentile subpixel technology that has caused issues with previous Android displays, some may have gripes with the display.

How the Nexus 10 Stacks Up to the Competition

The Nexus 10 isn’t the lightest or thinnest tablet, measuring in at 0.35 inches thick and 1.33 pounds. But it does have a massive 9000 mAh battery which gives it the ability to play HD video for 9 consecutive hours. Basically, it will last a long time.

Then there’s storage. Starting out at 16 gigabytes, and maxing out at 32GB, the Nexus 10 offers the least storage of all the competition, though one can argue that with so much being cloud based, 64 gigabytes is a luxury more than anything else.

Of course, specs mean nothing if the OS software doesn’t take proper advantage of it, but given the fact that Google is directly involved with this device, and the consistent excellence of the Exynos processors, the Nexus 10 certainly looks promising. [Nexus 10]

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Monday, October 29th, 2012 news No Comments

Google Introduces 3 New Sizes Of Nexus Devices (GOOG)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/google-new-nexus-tablet-smartphone-sizes-2012-10

nexus

Google has introduced three new Nexus devices in three different sizes.

The Nexus 4 is its smartphone-sized device. It has a zippy quad-core processor, a 4.7″ display, and runs Android 4.2 Jelly Bean, the latest version of Google’s mobile oeprating system.

The Nexus 7 is Google’s mid-size tablet. A 16 GB model is $199 and a 32 GB model is $249. For those who need wireless connectivity on the go, high-speed data options are also available.

The Nexus 10 is Google’s flagship tablet. It features a 2560×1600 resolution, making it ideal for watching movies or reading magazines. The battery will run for nine hours and provide 500 hours of standby time. Google also boasts that it’s a “shareable” tablet, meaning you can have multiple users log in and maintain their own settings on it. It’s a good solution for a family who wants everyone to have their own user experience on the tablet.

Google’s Nexus line of devices are designed and branded by Google but built by hardware partners who bid for the business. They’re different from the devices made by Google’s Motorola subsidiary. (Google could in theory pick Motorola to build Nexus devices, but it hasn’t done so with this batch.)

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Monday, October 29th, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5953002/this-no+name-chinese-company-could-kick-sonys-4k-ass

This No-Name Chinese Company Could Kick Sony's 4k AssThere’s little doubt Sony’s monstrous 84-inch 4k TV will be a high resolution atom bomb of a TV. There’s also no doubt it costs $25,000, about as much as an actual atom bomb. Hisense is selling a 4k unit for under $6,000. Do the math.

Major, major caveat: Hisense’s XT880 is 50 inches, whereas Sony’s 4k offering is 84. Thirty four inches is a lot of inches, and could account for the price disparity—and maybe preclude as huge a rift between Hisense’s as-of-yet-not-priced 65-inch 4k set and Sony’s closest equivalent.

This No-Name Chinese Company Could Kick Sony's 4k Ass Close up. Derp.

Second major caveat: 4k might not make sense at 50 inches. If you’re sitting far enough away, odds are you probably can’t notice the pixels in your 1080p television. But for those in smaller spaces, where the screen door effect pops up, Hisense will give you a (relatively) cheap way to never, ever notice pixels again, thanks to the fact that the company manufactures its own panel straight outta China, cutting out middle men. And indeed, smushing my face right up against the panel yielded not a single discernable pixel. There was some flicker at certain angles, and what looked like compression artifacts along image edges, but that could just as well be attributed to the source material.

This No-Name Chinese Company Could Kick Sony's 4k Ass SUPER CLOSE. WAY CLOSE THAN YOU WILL EVER ACTUALLY BE TO A TV.

We’ll see more from Hisense at CES, but in the mean time, don’t panic: there might actually be a way for you to afford the next great leap in HDTV.

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Thursday, October 18th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

This Awesome Image Shows Every Hurricane And Tropical Storm Since 1851

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/businessinsider/~3/kIQl9efBox4/this-awesome-image-shows-every-hurricane-and-tropical-storm-since-1851-2012-8

Hurricanes since 1851

Data-master John Neslon created this bottoms-up view (looking at the Earth from Antarctica) of every single tropical storm and hurricane we know about, dating back to 1851. It’s based on data from NOAA’s archives, which include wind speed, storm name, date, and other information. The color of the path is tied to intensity. See the highest resolution on Flickr.

From Nelson’s blog, called IDV User Experience:

A couple of things stood out to me about this data…

1) Structure.
Hurricanes clearly abhor the equator and fling themselves away from the warm waters of their birth as quickly as they can.  Paging Dr. Freud.
The void circling the image is the equator.  Hurricanes can never ever cross it.

2) Detection.
Detection has skyrocketed since satellite technology but mostly since we started logging storms in the eastern hemisphere.  Also the proportionality of storm severity looks to be getting more consistent year to year with the benefit of more data.

(Via i09)

See some more of John’s work: Maps Show Every Major Fire In America Since 2001 >

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Thursday, August 23rd, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5922937/now-that-high+res-screens-make-cameraphone-shots-look-ugly-will-you-use-an-actual-camera-again

Now That High-Res Screens Make Cameraphone Shots Look Ugly, Will You Use an Actual Camera Again?John Herrman over at Buzzfeed FWD astutely points out that all of the flaws of cameraphones (noisy sensors, poor focus abilities, artifacting, etc.) are being exposed now that we have large screens (both in size and resolution to display our images on). Going forward, is this enough of a reason to make you go back to carrying a proper, standalone camera? [FWD]

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Monday, July 2nd, 2012 news No Comments

Bolex Camera project raises nearly $250,000 in a single day

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/03/14/digital-bolex-kickstarter/

If anyone was still skeptical about the power of Kickstarter, they should pay attention. We’d lined up the Digital Bolex for a forthcoming episode of Insert Coin, but the project managed to surpass its $100,000 funding goal within 24 hours of going online. The camera is the brainchild of Joe Rubinstein and the antidote to most HD video snappers, which record footage in compressed and often interlaced formats that make editing unwieldy. The Digital Bolex, however, shoots its footage as uncompressed RAW files with a native resolution of 2048 x 1152 in Super 16mm mode. The aim is to provide a low-cost (around $3,000) way of getting this technology into the hands of filmmakers who are into their pistol grips. The project fund has swelled to an impressive $245,726 and there’s still 28 days left — would it be possible for them to make a million? If you fancy adding to the tally, shoot the source link and start hoping they can pull this off.

The power of Kickstarter: Bolex Camera project raises nearly $250,000 in a single day originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 14 Mar 2012 12:41:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Wednesday, March 14th, 2012 news No Comments

You Probably Can’t Tell the Difference Between This and a Theater Projector [Video]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5875000/sonys-4k-home-projector-eyes+on-you-probably-cant-tell-the-difference-between-this-and-a-theater-projector

Sony's 4K Home Projector Eyes-On: You Probably Can't Tell the Difference Between This and a Theater ProjectorSony’s 4K projector was first announced last year, but they have the thing on display at CES this year. After getting to zone out in a pitch black room where the projector blasted the new Spider Man trailer at full resolution on a 182-inch screen, I’m sold on the idea.

What makes 4K exciting for the home is that it provides a sharp image for large display sizes. 1080p video is great on a 60-inch TV, but it’s not quite as amazing when you try to project a 100-inch image on a wall. But 4K is made for screens exceeding 100 inches. So how did it look? While watching the trailer, I swore I had just paid $75 for a movie ticket and a small popcorn.

Colors were rich and bright. Nothing was washed out. Small details, like wrinkles on people’s faces or textures on a building were sharply defined. I go watch movies because I love the large screen experience. If I had one of these things, I probably wouldn’t go to the movies anymore.


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Wednesday, January 11th, 2012 news No Comments

Here’s The Information Facebook Gathers On You As You Browse The Web

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-tracking-2011-11


mark zuckerberg f8

Facebook stirred up privacy concerns when it came out that its “Like” and “Share” buttons appearing all over the web actually report your visits back to Facebook servers.

Now Facebook engineering director Arturo Bejar has shared what personal information the company retains with its tracking cookies, as reported by USA Today.

When you’re logged in, Facebook will keep a timestamped list of the URLs you visit and pair it with your name, list of friends, Facebook preferences, email address, IP address, screen resolution, operating system, and browser.

When you’re logged out, it captures everything except your name, list of friends, and Facebook preferences. Instead, it uses a unique alphanumeric identifier to track you.

Keep in mind that Facebook isn’t tracking your entire browsing history, just your visits to sites with “Like” and “Share” buttons.

Bejar told USA Today that Facebook technically could link your name to your logged-out browsing data, but he “makes it a point not to do this.”

Why does Facebook gather all this info and what do they do with it? By keeping so many details, it makes it easier to identify fake accounts and scammers. By keeping track of what users “Like” around the web, Facebook can show people ads that will be the most interesting to them and generate more revenue.

Despite Facebook having the best intentions — wanting to maintain a high quality user experience and generate ad revenue — you can see why privacy experts are concerned.

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Friday, November 18th, 2011 news No Comments

This Is Why that Amazing NASA Earth Image Looked So Familiar

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/Y-HwSNlxHLo/this-is-why-that-amazing-nasa-earth-image-looked-so-familiar

After publishing the The Most Accurate, Highest Resolution Earth View to Date, it got extremely popular: The day after, countless newspapers and blogs worldwide reposted the story. NASA wrote to us, surprised. Why? Because everyone already knew about it:

Yes, the Blue Marble is the iPhone’s default screen, which have been seen by millions of iPhone owners and by everyone who has read about the iPhone since 2007. In fact, the image has been public since 2002:

From: *************** <***********@nasa.gov>

Mr. Diaz

Hello. I am the photo editor for the Public Affairs Office at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center.

We were happy to see you featured our Blue Marble image on your website last week.

http://gizmodo.com/5478787/the-most-accurate-highest-resolution-earth-view-to-date#comments

We also featured it on our Flickr page but it has really taken off on the web. We had over 500,000 hits in the last two days alone.

Given that this is an image from 2002 I’m just curious what prompted you to post it on your site? Or did you pick it up from someplace other than our site? I see at the bottom it says “NASA via Twitter”

Really, I’m just curious because it’s gotten so much play over that few days.

Thank you for your interest in our work.

Take care,
Rebecca

The reason? Because it’s a beautiful image, that’s all. One that makes you marvel at the beauty of our planet, and how tiny and insignificant we are, but also how unique and rare. [Gizmodo—Thanks to John Hermann for telling me about the obvious]

Don’t forget to check NASA Goddard’s Flickr page. They keep posting really cool stuff.

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Friday, March 5th, 2010 digital No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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