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How Are Dead People Liking Stuff on Facebook?

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5967716/how-are-dead-people-liking-stuff-on-facebook

How Are Dead People Liking Stuff on Facebook?Have you noticed your friends liking stuff on Facebook that you know they don’t like? Yes? No? Well, have you seen some people like stuff on Facebook even though they’re… dead? It’s happening. And it’s because of a weird underworld of fake Facebook Likes.

Read Write took a look at the odd phenomenon of fake or accidental likes, showing countless examples of people claiming they’ve never liked a company or brand even though Facebook showed them as ‘Liking’ it. Facebook says these fake Likes aren’t fake at all but rather “accidental” mistakes, possibly done by “inadvertently pressing a button, perhaps on the mobile app.” I guess. Maybe it’s a good time to audit all your Facebook Likes to see if any rogue Likes happened to you.

How Are Dead People Liking Stuff on Facebook? But how does that explain people who’ve passed away still liking things after they’ve been, well, dead? The picture above shows a zombie Like.

A Facebook spokesman says the “likes” from dead people can happen if an account doesn’t get “memorialized” (meaning someone informs Facebook that the account-holder has died). If nobody tells Facebook that the account-holder is dead, Facebook just keeps operating on the assumption the person is alive.

And the way Facebook operates is that it keeps on recycling and re-using a user’s Like. So if you Like something from a long time ago, it could pop up again as if it was a bradn new Like. Read more about this weird Facebook phenomenon at Read Write. [Read Writer]

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Wednesday, December 12th, 2012 news No Comments

Exploit uses firewalls to hijack smartphones, turns friends into foes

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/05/22/exploit-uses-firewalls-to-hijack-smartphones/

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Normally, firewalls at cellular carriers are your best friends, screening out malware before it ever touches your phone. University of Michigan computer science researchers have found that those first lines of defense could be your enemy through a new exploit. As long as a small piece of malware sits on a device, that handset can infer TCP data packet sequence numbers coming from the firewall and hijack a phone’s internet traffic with phishing sites, fake messages or other rogue code. The trick works on at least 48 carriers that use firewalls from Check Point, Cisco, Juniper and other networking heavy hitters — AT&T being one of those providers. Carriers can turn the sequences off, although there are consequences to that as well. The only surefire solution is to either run antivirus apps if you’re on a mobile OS like Android or else to run a platform that doesn’t allow running unsigned apps at all, like iOS or Windows Phone. Whether or not the exploit is a serious threat is still far from certain, but we’ll get a better sense of the risk on May 22nd, when Z. Morley Mao and Zhiyun Qian step up to the podium at an IEEE security symposium and deliver their findings.

Exploit uses firewalls to hijack smartphones, turns friends into foes originally appeared on Engadget on T! ue, 22 M ay 2012 03:18:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Ars Technica  |  sourceUniversity of Michigan (PDF)  | Email this | Comments

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Tuesday, May 22nd, 2012 news No Comments

Google, Facebook, Twitter and others speak out against the Stop Online Piracy Act

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2011/11/16/google-facebook-twitter-and-others-speak-out-against-the-stop/

Earlier today, the House Judiciary Committee held a hearing on the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act (or SOPA) which, depending on who you ask, is either a means to stop piracy and copyright infringement on so-called “rogue” websites, or the most serious threat of internet censorship that we’ve seen in some time. In the latter camp are some of the biggest internet companies around, including Google, Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo, eBay, LinkedIn, Mozilla, Zynga and AOL (full disclosure: Engadget’s parent company), who today made their stance clear by taking out a full-page ad in The New York Times.

The ad itself is a letter sent by the nine companies to Congress, which states that while they support the stated goals of the bill and the related Protect IP Act, they believe that, as written, the bills “would expose law-abiding U.S. Internet and technology companies to new uncertain liabilities, private rights of action, and technology mandates that would require monitoring of web sites.” The companies further went on to say that they believe the measures also “pose a serious risk to our industry’s continued track record of innovation and job-creation, as well as to our Nation’s cybersecurity.” While they didn’t all sign onto the letter, those companies also also joined by a host of others who have spoken out against the legislation, including Foursquare and Tumblr. The sole witness against the proposed measures at today’s hearing, however, was Google’s copyright policy counsel, Katherine Oyama — you can find her testimony on Google’s Public Policy Blog linked below.

Google, Facebook, Twitter and others speak out against the Stop Online Piracy Act originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 16 Nov 2011 15:43:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink BoingBoing  |  sourceGoogle! Public Policy Blog, Letter to Congress (PDF)  | Email this | Comments


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Thursday, November 17th, 2011 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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