RULE

The SEC’s Attack On Netflix Is Ridiculous (NFLX)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/netflix-wells-notice-2012-12

Reed hastings

Netflix got a Wells notice from the SEC for a Facebook posting CEO Reed Hastings made.

This is ridiculous.

A Wells notice is a warning that the SEC is likely to bring charges against an individual or company. Typically, it’s done for a viable reason. In this case, the SEC is totally over-reaching, acting like a idiotic overly bureaucratic organization.

It’s moves like this that make it seem like government bureaucracy really does smother businesses.

Here’s what happened.

In July, Hastings posted to his Facebook page that Netflix had had 1 billion hours of streaming in June. The stock jumped that day.

If Hastings had just shared this information with a small circle of friends, you could make an argument that the information wasn’t publicly disseminated. But Hastings has 200,000 subscribers on Facebook, including journalists and analysts.

If the SEC wants to use this case to make a new rule about social media and what’s acceptable disclosure and what’s not, that’s fine. It should do that.

But to punish a company and executive for taking advantage of a new service to publicly disseminating information in a way that is vastly more public than SEC filings or press releases is unfair. Not to mention a waste of resources.

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Friday, December 7th, 2012 news No Comments

Facebook’s "Like" Buttons Are Under Threat (FB)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/facebooks-like-buttons-are-under-threat-2012-10

Mark Zuckerberg

Web sites are not allowed to collect infomration on users under 13 without their parents permission.

it’s part of a child-privacy law called COPPA.

This is trouble for Facebook because of “like” buttons, which are on about 9 million Websites. 

You can image how hard it would be for Facebook to make sure that everyone who clicks a like button is over 13.

Really hard. Even a little added friction, such as a “are you 13 and over?” dialogue box would tremendously slow down volume.

So that’s why Facebook sent a 20-page letter to the FTC (.PDF), last week, arguing (begging?) for a change in this  rule. Facebook argued that Like buttons are free speech.

The rule should change.

How is the fact that a kid clicked “like” any kind of threat to their saftey or privacy?

But sometimes the government does stupid things, so maybe the law won’t change.

That’d be pretty bad news for Facebook, which is dependent on all those “likes” for a lot of traffic and engagement.

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Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012 news No Comments

90-9-1 or 1-9-90 Rule of Social Media Participation

90-9-1 or 1-9-90 Rule of Social Media Participation

90-9-1 or 1-9-90 Rule of Social Media Participation

90 readers 9 editors 1 creators

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Wednesday, May 16th, 2012 digital, Social media, statistics No Comments

Sports Fans Coalition motivated the FCC to review its NFL blackout rules

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/01/12/sports-fans-coalition-motivated-the-fcc-to-review-its-nfl-blacko/

Well, well, apparently the Sports Fans Coalition was had some success getting the FCC’s attention about the unfairness that is the most popular sports league in the State’s blackout policy. Currently, the NFL rules require any game that isn’t sold out to be blacked out in the home team’s market. The FCC extended that rule from over-the-air broadcasters to cable and satellite since most people don’t get TV with an antenna. This sounds like a good use of the FCC’s time and all, but considering FOX, CBS etc own the rights, we don’t see how removing this rule would change the NFL’s mind on its blackout policy. We suppose it’s possible that publicity from this type of deliberation from the FCC could spur bigger change from the NFL or even Congress, but considering the success of the NFL, this might not end peacefully.

Sports Fans Coalition motivated the FCC to review its NFL blackout rules originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 12 Jan 2012 21:42:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceLA Times!  | Email this | Comments


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Friday, January 13th, 2012 news No Comments

Google Violated Its Own Evil-Free Policies While Promoting Chrome [Google]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5872566/google-violated-its-own-evil+free-policies-while-promoting-chrome

Google Violated Its Own Evil-Free Policies While Promoting Chrome

The first rule of not being evil is: don’t do things you think are evil. So it’s a shame that Google has violated its own policy by giving bloggers cash in exchanges for writing about its browser, Chrome.

Google, or perhaps more likely its advertising firm Unruly, has managed to sponsor bloggers to chew the fat over Chrome, reports SEO Book. Some of them talk about how great Chrome is for small businesses, and most contain a Google promo video.

Meh, that’s kind of fine, right? Mmm, the thing is, paid-for links to the Chrome download page would be just fine according to Google’s rules — as long as they were tagged up as “nofollow” links. That’s supposed to let PageRank know that a link was paid for so as to exclude it from search rankings.

But, uh, some of the links didn’t follow that guideline.

OK, so this isn’t too bad: it isn’t like Google is culling small kittens, granted. And it could in fact be an innocent mistake on the part of the bloggers. But what it more likely indicates is that Google is getting so large that it can’t help but trip over its own policies. And at that point, it becomes difficult to hold an entire organisation up to its existing ethical codes.

So, don’t be evil. At least, if you can remember what you mean by evil. [SEO Book via TechCrunch; Image: brionv]


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Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012 news No Comments

Sports Fans Coalition intends to lobby against NFL blackouts

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2011/11/16/sports-fans-coalition-intends-to-lobby-against-nfl-blackouts/

We know how it is, you have a big HDTV and inexpensive adult beverages at home and you just don’t feel compelled to spend the bucks to go to the game in these tough economic times. We feel for you, but the NFL does not as your situation doesn’t exactly pay all those player’s salaries. Well, starting this Friday the Sports Fans Coalition, along with other organizations, plans to petition the FCC for change to the current blackout rule. The groups argue that since many of the stadiums are built with public funds, Joe Consumer has the right to watch those games at home. As is, we’re mostly just glad the old NFL blackout policy, prior to 1973 that made all home games unavailable to the home market, isn’t still in effect. Of course that doesn’t mean that we believe the current blackout policy actually helps sell those $100+ tickets and believe the NFL might realize more profits if it sought out more modern supplemental revenue strategies.

Sports Fans Coalition intends to lobby against NFL blackouts originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 16 Nov 2011 23:57:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Thursday, November 17th, 2011 news No Comments

no wonder banner ads get so few clicks :-)

Add-Art Replaces Advertisements with Artwork

Firefox only (Windows/Mac/Linux): Add-Art is a unique advertisement-blocking solution for Firefox. Instead of simply deleting ads from the page, it replaces them with art by featured artists.

The open-source project was inspired by the popularity of ad-blocking Firefox extensions—Adblock Plus, the perennial Lifehacker favorite, is downloaded over 250,000 times a week—and a desire to put all those blocked pitches to good use. Artists are selected by a team of curators to have their work displayed, and the roster is rotated every two weeks. An interesting twist to the project is that the artists themselves can target sites with their artwork—it’ll be up to you to decide why there are photographs of unicorns wearing party hats during your daily reading of the New York Times. Add-Art won’t be too tempting to those who ad-block to streamline for speed or memory use, but for those tired of seeing “ONE WEIGHT LOSS RULE” and the like might just enjoy the web a bit more. Add-Art is free, works wherever Firefox does.

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Tuesday, February 10th, 2009 digital, marketing No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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