search engines

How Do Affluent Luxury Buyers Research Their Purchases?

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/television/how-do-affluent-luxury-buyers-research-their-purchases-36684/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

IpsosGoogle-Affluent-Luxury-Buyers-Research-Habits-Sept2013More than 9 in 10 luxury buyers search for information prior to making a purchase, according to [pdf] a study conducted by Google and Ipsos across 9 markets. The research indicates that online research is more popular among respondents in fast-growing luxury markets such as Brazil and China than in traditional luxury markets such as France, the US, and Germany, where the average age of buyers is older. Roughly half of the information sources checked overall are online.

The survey was conducted among luxury purchasers (at least 2 luxury purchases in the past 2year in apparel/accessories and jewelry/watches) aged 25-65 with high household income levels that tended to be in the top 5-8% of each market’s households.

Among respondents in all of the markets, the most popular method for searching for information offline is by talking to someone or seeing and trying the product in-store or at an event. For respondents from new markets (China, Brazil, and Russia), reading or hearing the information in media ranks as the second-most common way of finding information offline, followed by seeing someone wearing the product. Among mature market respondents (France, UK, US, Italy, and Germany), the second-most common way of finding information offline is also through the media, while print ads (in newspapers or magazines) are next. Finally, in the Japanese market, talking to friends, family and colleagues ranks third behind the media.

For each group of markets, search engines were the most commonly used online information source, followed by looking for information on a website and application.

Internet Use Ubiquitous; Traditional Media Still Has Reach

When it comes to affluent luxury buyers’ media habits, the study find that the internet is almost universally used on a d! aily basi! s. TV’s reach ranges from 82-89% across the market segments, with newspapers in the 58-65% range. There is much more variance in magazine use, with 57% of respondents in new markets reading a magazine daily, compared to 39% in mature markets and 22% in Japan. Radio also sees a wide range of use, from a high of 74% in mature markets, down to 59% in new markets and just 23% in Japan.

Other Findings:

  • On average, respondents spent $2,500 on their last luxury purchase.
  • Most luxury purchases occur offline, with that skew most pronounced in Japan.
  • Affluent luxury buyers are more likely than the general population to own a variety of devices, with tablet penetration at 73% in new markets.
  • The main reasons for purchasing online are that it is convenient (53%), can be done anywhere, anytime (49%) and to find good deals (48%). The main barriers to shopping online are a preference for seeing and touching the product (65%) and concerns over the risk of counterfeit (35%).
  • The preferred online ad formats for luxury goods are video and full-screen ads.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013 news No Comments

Oren Etzioni Could Be The Most Successful Entrepreneur You’ve Never Heard Of

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/oren-etzioni-is-one-successful-founder-2013-9

Oren Etzioni

Decide.com announced on Friday that it was being acqu-hired by eBay and would shutter its service at the end of the month.

The entire team of 26 people will now go work for eBay.

Decide.com predicts the prices on electronics and helps people pay less for them. It’s not surprising eBay would want to buy this company. Decide.com had been using eBay’s data to help with its predictions, CEO Mike Fridgen said in a blog post.

But one of the most remarkable things about this deal is that it marks the sixth-in-a-row successful exit for cofounder and CTO Oren Etzioni.

Etzioni helped invent the concept of big data back when the Web was young, way before the term “big data.” We’re talking even before Google.

Etzioni is a computer science professor at the University of Washington (and these days, also a partner at Seattle’s Madrona Venture Group). In between teaching and publishing hundreds of technical papers, he keeps creating valuable tech.

In 1994, four years before Google was born, he created one of the web’s first search engines MetaCrawler, bought by Infospace (and still running today). In 1995, he cofounded the first shopping comparison engine, NetBot, bought by Excite. Then he created ClearForest, which summarizes text documents, bought by Reuters.

In 2003, after he learned that he paid more for an airline ticket than the guy sitting next to him, he created a program that scraped travel sites to predict airfare prices. That became FareCast. It sold to Microsoft in 2008 for $110 million and is now a part of Bing.

In 2011, he took what he learned at FareCast and launched Decide.com to predict electronics prices. It was backed by Madrona (naturally) but also early Google early investor Ram Shriram and Rich Barton (cofounder of! Zillow, Expedia, Glassdoor).

Now, two years later eBay bought Decide.com. Terms weren’t disclosed, but we know that it raised about $17 million including a recent $8 million round in March that included Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen’s VC firm Vulcan Capital.

Given Etzioni’s history we’re willing to make our own prediction. He’ll be back with another successful startup and soon.

 


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Saturday, September 7th, 2013 news No Comments

Social Media Drives a Small Share of Online Consumers to Retail Sites

source: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/Social-Media-Drives-Small-Share-of-Online-Consumers-Retail-Sites/1010070

Largest portion of social media traffic comes from Facebook

Digital resources have upended the traditional linear path-to-purchase model, with consumers now relying on a number of resources to shop for and purchase goods online. Social media has certainly played a role in that process, but research from L2 Think Tank found that little traffic was flowing from social media to retail sites.

Among all traffic sources, search engines dominated, leading 35.5% of traffic to retailers, followed by direct web browsing (33.9%), referrals (18.4%) and email (8.7%). Social media pushed 2.4% of traffic, above only display ads, which led 1.1% of visitors to retail sites.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, July 24th, 2013 news No Comments

Pinterest (1.8%) Refers More Traffic Than Twitter (0.8%), But Still Small

Source: SmartCompany

Social network Pinterest now refers more users to websites than either Twitter or Yahoo!, according to new figures.

The figures, released by social sharing widget provider Shareaholic, reveals that 1.84% of users to websites using its tools were sent from Pinterest, which has now overtaken Yahoo! (1.37% of visitors), Bing (1.03%), StumbleUpon (0.97%) and Twitter (0.80%) as a source of visitors.

However, Pinterest remains significantly behind Google (41.28%), direct traffic (20.03%) and Facebook (5.9%) as a source of traffic.

The figures were drawn by examining traffic sources from 200,000 websites using Shareaholic’s web tools.

UPDATED  Feb 12, 2013

Search engines still dwarf email and social media as an e-commerce traffic driver. 32% of e-commerce site visits in Q4 came from search, compared to 4.3% from email and just 1.9% from social media. In fact, Q4 marked the third consecutive quarter that social media’s influence waned.

Traffic from search engines also tends to have a larger average order value (AOV) than the other sources analyzed by Monetate. In Q4, AOV from search was $97.54, about 9% higher than from email ($89.64) and roughly 40% higher than from social ($69.46).

About the Data: Monetate’s E-commerce Quarterly analyzes a random sample of over 100 million online shopping experiences using “same store” data across each calendar quarter. Averages throughout the EQ are calculated across the entire sample. Key performance indicators, such as average order value and conversion rate, will vary by industry/market type. These averages are published only to support the analysis in each release of the EQ, and are not intended to be benchmarks for any e-commerce business.

Ecommerce Traffic Referrers

Shareaholic Referral Traffic Sources Report

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013 news No Comments

Most people click on organic results and they have highest CTR

Methodology of organic CTR vs paid CTR

– reviewing dozens of Google Analytics sites has shown that traffic from organic results is far greater than traffic from paid ads on search engines; roughly 75 – 85% of the traffic is from the organic side while 15 – 25% come from the paid side

Click through rate of organic results

– click through rates on the organic side were derived from analyzing dozens of client sites via webmaster tools. The click through rate of organic results is defined as number of clicks divided by number of impressions in organic search result pages.

– average click through rates from paid search are well published and well known from dozens of sources published online over the years.

organic has higher clicks and click through rates and are free

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday, July 20th, 2012 analytics, digital, digital strategy, SEM, SEO No Comments

Source: http://lifehacker.com/5911079/how-to-hide-your-tweets-from-google

How to Hide Your Tweets from GoogleProvided you occasionally Google yourself you’re probably well aware that your Twitter account is placed pretty high on Google’s search rankings. Because of that it’s usually best to make sure you’re not doing anything too embarrassing. If you did release a bad tweet, the Twitter support page has put together a guide for getting those tweets out of Google’s search.

If you don’t want your Twitter account to show up on Google the best way to hide it is to change your name in your profile settings or alter your settings so your account is private. Even if you change your account to private every tweet prior to that change is still public and Google will cache those tweets for a long while. So what do you do if you need to hide that angry tweet that shows up in a Google search but you already deleted? Twitter’s suggestion is to take it straight to Google:

  1. Copy the Twitter URL you’d like removed (if you already deleted the tweet just follow Google’s URL).
  2. Head over to Google’s Content Removal page.
  3. Paste in the Twitter link that you copied in the first step and submit your request.

Google should remove the cached link pretty quickly and it won’t show up in the Google search results for your name. This could come in very handy if you need to clean up your search results before submitting a job application. Hit up the Twitter support page for a few more ideas for hiding your Twitter info from search engines and if you need help with other pages consult our guide to fixing internet embarrassments.

Why is My Twitter Profile in Google Search? | Twitter Help Center via Mashable

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, May 17th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Bing Now Powers Over 30% Of U.S. Searches

Source: http://techcrunch.com/2012/05/11/hitwise-bing-now-powers-over-30-of-u-s-searches/

bing_logo

Just a day after it announced its well-received updates to its search result pages, here is some more good news for Bing: according to the latest data from Experian Hitwise, Bing-powered searches — that is searches on Bing.com and search.yahoo.com — now account for 30.01% of all U.S. searches. By itself, Bing grew 16% year-over-year and 5% month-over-month and now accounted for 14.32% of all U.S. searches in April 2012. Yahoo grew somewhat slower, but still at a respectable 5% month-over-month and 7% year-over-year.

Things didn’t quite look so rosy for Google, though. Searches on Google.com, according to Hitwise, declined 3% in April 2011 compared to the previous month and were down 5% year-over-year. Google, of course, still remains far ahead of its competition. In April, almost 64.5% of all U.S. searches were powered by Google.

The 65 smaller search engines Hitwise also tracks only accounted for 6.51% of U.S. searches, by the way.

While Bing is still losing money – and while there have been some rumors about Microsoft trying to sell its search engine to Facebook – there can be little doubt that Microsoft’s persistence is slowly paying off and eating into Google’s still sizable lead. Leaving out the searches it powers on Yahoo, Bing itself, of course, still remains a niche player at under 15%, but crossing the 30% barrier is quite an achievement for Bing.


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Saturday, May 12th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Google Still 80 Percent Of E-Commerce Referrals

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/google-still-80-percent-of-e-commerce-referralsbut-facebook-up-92-percent-2012-2


Google is still e-commerce’s best friend, at least for the time being. Social is just beginning to change  business online, but search engines still dominate referral traffic to e-commerce sites.

Google alone accounts for over 80 percent of e-commerce traffic referrals, according to a study by RichRelevance. Meanwhile, Facebook made up 0.5 percent of traffic, but that number was up 92 percent from the year prior.

There is some anecdotal evidence that this may be changing. At yesterday’s Social Commerce Summit, Sheezan Bakali, Director of Marketing at hot flash sales startup Fab, indicated that Facebook was its third largest source of traffic after direct traffic and e-mail referrrals. Nonetheless, search still powers e-commerce—for now.

Drivers of E-Commerce Traffic

Please follow BI Intelligence on Twitter.

Join the conversation about this story »

See Also:



Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, February 8th, 2012 news No Comments

You Won’t Believe How Big This Profitable 5-Person Startup Is

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/you-wont-believe-how-big-this-profitable-5-person-startup-is-2011-11


adrian constantin tv links

We recently met with Adrian Constantin, the founder of video startup TV Links

TV Links is a video aggregator and search engine, serving up videos from hundreds of sites, similar to US startup Clicker.

It’s not the most innovative business in the world, but here’s what you should know about it: it’s bootstrapped, profitable, it claims 37 million monthly unique visitors, and it has only 5 employees

TV Links is not just impressive, it’s interesting because it’s a combination of two important trends: globalization, and the extreme capital efficiency of online businesses. 

Globalization: the company has developers in Romania, servers in Spain and in the US through Amazon, and most of its users coming from the US, UK and Canada. 

Extreme capital efficiency: the company basically outsources everything: hosting, advertising and even some development. 

TV Links’ one weak spot is that it gets the vast majority of its traffic from Google and so will live and die by SEO. But the company has ambitious plans; it’s even starting to produce its own original video. 

We once wrote that Instagram is the future of startups in part because of its extreme capital efficiency: it has over 10 million users and half a dozen staff (the other reason is distribution via app stores and social media). TV Links is another example of this extreme capital efficiency; unlike Instagram, it gets distribution through the more “traditional” medium of search engines, but unlike Instagram it’s also profitable. 

This new reality has broad implications beyond startups. If you’re wondering about the sky-high valuations of companies like LinkedIn or Twitter, part of your calculus should also take into account the fact that it’s now possible to build these very efficient businesses with huge global markets, something which wasn’t possible 10 years ago when “clouds” were still things in the sky and the internet population was counted in millions, not billions.

We will see many more of these ultra capital-efficient, globally-distributed online businesses in the future. 

MORE: Why Instagram Is The Future Of Startups →

Please follow SAI on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

See Also:




drag2share – drag and drop RSS news items on your email contacts to share (click SEE DEMO)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, December 7th, 2011 news No Comments

What is Web 3.0? Characteristics of Web 3.0

2009 06 16 What Is Web 3.0

2009 06 16 What Is Web 3.0 – Presentation Transcript

  1. What is Web 3.0? Dr. Augustine Fou June 16, 2009. June 16, 2009.
  2. Evolution of the Internet microprocessor 40 yrs 10 yrs 20 yrs 5 yrs present web internet 2.5 yrs social networks e-commerce 1.5 yrs Web 1.0 Web 2.0 Web 3.0? June 16, 2009.
  3. Evolution of the “Web” content commerce search social networks social content social search social commerce As each stage reaches critical mass, the next stage is tipped into present June 16, 2009.
  4. Key Characteristics present web 1.0 web 2.0 web 3.0
    • Speedy
    • more timely information and more efficient tools to find information
    • Collaborative
    • actions of users amass, police, and prioritize content
    • Trust-worthy
    • users establish trust networks and hone trust radars
    • Content
    • content destination sites and personal portals
    • Search
    • critical mass of content drives need for search engines
    • Commerce
    • commerce goes mainstream; digital goods rise
    • Ubiquitous
    • available at any time, anywhere, through any channel or device
    • Individualized
    • filtered and shared by friends or trust networks
    • Efficient
    • relevant and contextual information findable instantly

June 16, 2009.

  1. Illustrative Examples – retail/shopping present web 1.0 web 2.0 web 3.0
    • what friends bought or want to buy
    • drag-to-share items which friends know friends are looking for
    • item collections
    • value in the aggregation

overstock.com amazon.com FB app: MyFaveThings

    • contextual reviews
    • reviews of reviews
    • what others bought
    • individualized recommendations

June 16, 2009.

  1. Illustrative Examples – social networks present web 1.0 web 2.0 web 3.0
    • aggregates all your online identities
    • syndicates all your updates to all social networks
    • social actions visible to friends
    • trust networks across geography, time, and interests
    • collection of personal homepages

geocities.com facebook.com peoplebrowsr.com June 16, 2009.

  1. Illustrative Examples – restaurant reviews present web 1.0 web 2.0 web 3.0
    • Yelp content vetted through a user’s trust network and individual recommendations made based on situation and need, in real-time
    • user submitted reviews
    • related items based on similarity of user preferences
    • infrequent publication
    • centralized editorial control

zagat‘s yelp need reco for great Italian + GPS + Yelp 5-star Babbo, been there, love it June 16, 2009.

  1. Illustrative Examples – photos present web 1.0 web 2.0 web 3.0
    • real-time, contextual “do you like this knit shirt?”
    • friends give immediate feedback
    • share photos with friends and strangers
    • enable visitors to tag and comment
    • individual albums

kodakgallery.com flickr.com ? June 16, 2009.

  1. Illustrative Examples – real estate present web 1.0 web 2.0 web 3.0
    • information vetted by fellow users, recommended directly an in context
    • listings plus relevant information like school zones, comparable sales, alerts
    • listings based on parameters

corcoran.com streeteasy.com trulia iphone app June 16, 2009.

  1. Illustrative Examples – encyclopedia present web 1.0 web 2.0 web 3.0
    • content is ubiquitous and available through any channel or device
    • trust network proactively forwards relevant info to user who needs it
    • created, updated, and edited (policed) by user actions
    • digitized version of printed encyclopedia

britannica.com wikipedia.com chacha.com June 16, 2009.

  1. Illustrative Examples – online coupons present web 1.0 web 2.0 web 3.0
    • coupons delivered contextually and proactively when user needs it (without the user even asking for it)
    • instant feedback
    • community action makes it more accurate and useful for others
    • collection of online coupons – value in the aggregation

dealcatcher.com retailmenot.com June 16, 2009.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

Augustine Fou portrait
http://twitter.com/acfou
Send Tips: tips@go-digital.net
Digital Strategy Consulting
Dr. Augustine Fou LinkedIn Bio
Digital Marketing Slideshares
The Grand Unified Theory of Marketing