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drag2share: Android Users: Google Has ALL Your Wi-Fi Passwords (GOOG)

source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/businessinsider/~3/46JvzOzUKCg/google-collecting-wi-fi-passwords-2013-9

Computerworld’s Michael Horowitz shares some news that will do little to alleviate worries about Google’s privacy policy:

If an Android device (phone or tablet) has ever logged on to a particular Wi-Fi network, then Google probably knows the Wi-Fi password. Considering how many Android devices there are, it is likely that Google can access most Wi-Fi passwords worldwide.

Some back-of-the-envelope math points us to the estimate that 748 million Android phones will ship this year. That’s phones alone – Android tablets add to that figure.

With this many of its own devices in the wild, it becomes easy to see that Google has access to all order of Wi-Fi passwords.

This is all possible because of a feature that lets you back up and save your data to Google’s servers. This includes the obvious, like backing up your phone book and calendar, but it also snags your Wi-Fi passwords in the process. The feature is presented as a good thing, and by and large it is – if you lose a phone and need to replace it, all your data is backed up thanks to Google. No obnoxious re-entering of all your friends’ and family’s phone numbers, no need to scrounge up the passwords for your various Wi-Fi networks.

If the privacy implications of this outweigh the convenience, you can opt out by unchecking the appropriate box in your settings. Horowitz offers the following instructions on how to navigate to the appropriate dialogue:

  • In A ndroid 2.3.4, go to Settings, then Privacy. On an HTC device, the option that gives Google your Wi-Fi password is “Back up my settings”. On a Samsung device, the option is called “Back up my data”. The only description is “Back up current settings and application data”. No mention is made of Wi-Fi passwords.
  • In Android 4.2, go to Settings, then “Backup and reset”. The option is called “Back up my data”. The description says “Back up application data, Wi-Fi passwords, and other settings to Google servers”.

It’s also worth noting that like all personal data stored in Google, humans aren’t looking at your Wi-Fi passwords. This tool is simply a convenient feature for Android users who don’t want to keep re-entering their passwords.


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Friday, September 13th, 2013 news No Comments

Adobe’s Creative Cloud Has Already Been Pirated

Source: http://gizmodo.com/adobes-creative-cloud-has-already-been-pirated-514563307

Adobe's Creative Cloud Has Already Been Pirated

Adobe’s shift to cloud-based software provision for its new Creative Cloud design suite was partly motivated by anti-piracy concerns. Which, of course, means… it’s already been pirated.

Just one day after the official roll out of Creative Cloud, a certain Ching Liu has already uploaded a torrent link to The Pirate Bay which provides a cracked version of the software. Named “Adobe Photoshop CC 14.0 Final Multilanguage”, comments left by Pirate Bay users suggest it works just great.

It remains to be seen if it will work long-term—the new desktop apps have to to connect to Adobe’s servers every month to re-validate their subscription status—but clearly Liu has got around the connectivity issues required for install. And clearly Adobe needs to up its anti-piracy game. [FStoppers via Peta Pixel]

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Thursday, June 20th, 2013 news No Comments

Where Microsoft’s Profits Come From (MSFT)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-microsoft-income-by-segment-2012-10

When Microsoft revealed its first ever computer, the Surface, CEO Steve Ballmer said, “Windows is the heart and soul of Microsoft from Windows PCs to Windows Servers to Windows Phones and Windows Azure.”

And while that’s certainly accurate, the Windows division was not the company’s heart and soul as far as profits go, last quarter. The company made twice as much money last quarter from the Business Division, which is home to Office. And Microsoft’s Server and Tools group had bigger profits than the Windows division.

The reason Windows profits were light is that Microsoft is in a transition from Windows 7 to Windows 8. Windows operating profit should pick back up once Windows 8 sales pick up this quarter into next year.

chart of the day, microsoft income by segment, oct 2012

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Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012 news No Comments

Microsoft’s Windows Division Generated Less Revenue Than Its Servers Division (MSFT)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-microsoft-revenue-by-segement-2012-7

Here’s an incredible chart from Microsoft’s last earnings report that didn’t get the sort of attention it deserves. The Server and Tools division generated more revenue than the Windows division in the last fiscal year.

The Windows division is still much more profitable, earning $11.5 billion compared versus $7.4 billion for Servers & Tools. And one of the reasons Windows generated less revenue than Server & Tools is that Windows 7 is at the end of its run.

However, this chart is illustrative of a two big trends for Microsoft. First, while Vanity Fair wants to call it a lost decade for Microsoft, it clearly wasn’t all lost since it built a third huge new business division. Second, while people worry about the future of Windows, and whether or not it gets disrupted by iOS and Android, the truth of the matter is that Microsoft is more than just Windows.

chart of the day, microsoft's revenue by segment, july 2012

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Tuesday, July 31st, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5882703/your-deleted-facebook-photos-still-arent-really-deleted

Your Deleted Facebook Photos Still Aren't Really DeletedThree years ago, Ars Technica discovered that when you “deleted” your photos, they were still kept on Facebook’s servers, and anyone with a static URL could still access it. Three years later, Ars Technica revisited the matter and found little has changed. But Facebook says that things will be different…eventually.

Ars Technica’s Jacqui Cheng got Facebook to comment on the matter, they’re developing a new one which will permanently wipe photo off their servers within 45 days of a user “deleting” the photo from the site.

“The systems we used for photo storage a few years ago did not always delete images from content delivery networks in a reasonable period of time even though they were immediately removed from the site,” Facebook spokesperson Frederic Wolens told Ars via e-mail.

Wolens explained that photos remaining online are stuck in a legacy system that was apparently never operating properly, but said the company is working on a new system that will delete the photos in a mere month and a half. For really real this time.

So if there’s some incriminating piece of imagery on Facebook you’re really dying to have removed once and for all, maybe all hope isn’t lost entirely. [Ars Technica]

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Monday, February 6th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

#whentwitterwasdown – Twitter crippled by massive #ddos (distributed denial of service) attack

As many of you may have noticed, Twitter was down for many hours starting Thursday morning August 6 and remained intermittent even when it was brought back up. The theory is that this was caused by a massive DDOS attack on their servers including the services that other web applications depended on — that means that outside services (twitter applications) were also taken down.

For an explanation of denial-of-service attack or distributed-denial-of-service, this is the wikipedia entry. It basically is an attacker using a large number of “zombie” computers to “hit” the victim’s site at the same time, thus overloading it, and causing it to not be able to respond to legitimate traffic.

ddos-diagram

Full Coverage of the Social Media DDoS (Source: Mashable)


Is Cyber Warfare to Blame for Twitter Meltdown?

Denial of Service Attacks Being Investigated by Google, Twitter, Facebook

Facebook Problems Also the Result of DDoS Attack

Twitter Outage Explained: What’s a Distributed Denial of Service Attack (DDoS)?

Twitter Down Due to Denial of Service Attack (DDoS)

Facebook Down. Twitter Down. Social Media Meltdown.

Twitter Down: Twitter Doesn’t Know Why

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Friday, August 7th, 2009 digital No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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