shame

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/vip/~3/m4BrOmW6wmI/sopas-back-from-the-dead-and-this-time-its-a-virus

SOPA's Back From the Dead and This Time It's a Virus If you thought SOPA was dead, well, you’d be mostly right. Its bloated corpse, however, has been resurrected by hacker puppeteers for the valiant purpose of scamming people out of their cash.

The new virus is a pretty standard piece of ransomware that claims to have locked down your computer and offers to unlock it for the nominal fee of $200, but this one waves around the SOPA name for a little extra scare. Anyone who remembers the name, but not that the bill never went through, might be a little concerned at the accusations of piracy. That said, it doesn’t take a genius to realize that the U.S. government probably wouldn’t be collecting fines in the form of euros via Western Union, like ever.

Fortunately this SOPA doesn’t threaten to destroy the Internet as we know it but rather just your private stash of files, illegal and otherwise and it’s an empty threat at that. If you know how to Google things the solution won’t cost you a cent. It’s just a shame all legislation can’t be manually removed. [TorrentFreak via Geekosystem]

SOPA's Back From the Dead and This Time It's a Virus

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Saturday, October 13th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/vip/~3/m4BrOmW6wmI/sopas-back-from-the-dead-and-this-time-its-a-virus

SOPA's Back From the Dead and This Time It's a Virus If you thought SOPA was dead, well, you’d be mostly right. Its bloated corpse, however, has been resurrected by hacker puppeteers for the valiant purpose of scamming people out of their cash.

The new virus is a pretty standard piece of ransomware that claims to have locked down your computer and offers to unlock it for the nominal fee of $200, but this one waves around the SOPA name for a little extra scare. Anyone who remembers the name, but not that the bill never went through, might be a little concerned at the accusations of piracy. That said, it doesn’t take a genius to realize that the U.S. government probably wouldn’t be collecting fines in the form of euros via Western Union, like ever.

Fortunately this SOPA doesn’t threaten to destroy the Internet as we know it but rather just your private stash of files, illegal and otherwise and it’s an empty threat at that. If you know how to Google things the solution won’t cost you a cent. It’s just a shame all legislation can’t be manually removed. [TorrentFreak via Geekosystem]

SOPA's Back From the Dead and This Time It's a Virus

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Saturday, October 13th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Google AdChoices – 8 ads per page? Do Advertisers Know About This?

I am sure you are looking at the AdChoices example, right?
Who thinks this is just as evil as Facebook putting 7 display ads on the same page.
http://go-digital.net/blog/2010/11/not-1-not-2-not-3-but-4-display-ads-per-pageview-shame-on-you-facebook/

Inline image 1

What are AdChoices?

Ad Choices
The AdChoices icon appears on sites that use Google’s AdSense program to show ads. While Google often shows you ads based on the content of the page you are viewing, we also show some ads based on the types of websites you visit, view, or where you interact with an ad or other Google product supported by Google’s advertising services. In doing this, Google doesn’t know your name or any other personal information about you. Google simply recognizes the number stored in your browser on the DoubleClick cookie, and shows ads related to the interest and inferred demographic categories associated with that cookie. It’s our goal to make these ads as relevant and useful as possible for you. Google doesn’t create categories, or show ads, based on sensitive topics such as race, religion, sexual orientation, or health.

Where can I learn more about how Google protects privacy?

  • To learn more about how we collect and use information at Google, please visit our Privacy Center

What choices do I have about advertising from Google?

  • Google lets you edit the categories associated with your browser, or opt out of personalized advertising, through Google’s Ads Preferences Manager.
  • Google may use your Google account information, such as items you +1 on Google properties and across the web, to personalize content and ads on non-Google websites. If you’d like to control how you see +1 recommendations from people you know, and how your +1 recommendations are shown to others, please visit the +1 button account setting page.

Learn More!

  • Learn more about online advertising from the Network Advertising Initiative.
  • Find more on browser controls and plug-in tools to help set and maintain your privacy choices.

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Wednesday, March 21st, 2012 display advertising No Comments

Google Violated Its Own Evil-Free Policies While Promoting Chrome [Google]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5872566/google-violated-its-own-evil+free-policies-while-promoting-chrome

Google Violated Its Own Evil-Free Policies While Promoting Chrome

The first rule of not being evil is: don’t do things you think are evil. So it’s a shame that Google has violated its own policy by giving bloggers cash in exchanges for writing about its browser, Chrome.

Google, or perhaps more likely its advertising firm Unruly, has managed to sponsor bloggers to chew the fat over Chrome, reports SEO Book. Some of them talk about how great Chrome is for small businesses, and most contain a Google promo video.

Meh, that’s kind of fine, right? Mmm, the thing is, paid-for links to the Chrome download page would be just fine according to Google’s rules — as long as they were tagged up as “nofollow” links. That’s supposed to let PageRank know that a link was paid for so as to exclude it from search rankings.

But, uh, some of the links didn’t follow that guideline.

OK, so this isn’t too bad: it isn’t like Google is culling small kittens, granted. And it could in fact be an innocent mistake on the part of the bloggers. But what it more likely indicates is that Google is getting so large that it can’t help but trip over its own policies. And at that point, it becomes difficult to hold an entire organisation up to its existing ethical codes.

So, don’t be evil. At least, if you can remember what you mean by evil. [SEO Book via TechCrunch; Image: brionv]


drag2share – drag and drop RSS news items on your email contacts to share (click SEE DEMO)

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Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012 news No Comments

Not 1, Not 2, Not 3, But 4 Display Ads Per Pageview – Shame on You Facebook

Updated May 12, 2012. Freddy Nager, Prof of Integrated Marketing at UCLA sent me a screen shot showing 9 display ads per page. The unscupulosity of Facebook is at an all time high – right up to their IPO.

THANKS Freddy Nager @AtomicTango, Prof of Integrated Marketing, UCLA for the screen grab of 9 and 10 ads per page.

http://atomictango.com/2012/04/20/myspace-facebook-continued/

Updated February 3, 2012.  This is how Facebook is growing ad revenues – SEVEN DISPLAY ADS PER PAGE – EVIL!

facebook ads

 

 

But despite this kind of “cheating” their revenues are decelerating. And there is the “danger” of advertisers getting smart and changing from paying on a CPM basis to paying only on a CPC basis — paying only when they get the click. That would mean Facebook’s revenue could drop off a cliff.

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-facebook-revenues-are-decelerating-2012-2

Facebook revenues decelerating

 

Updated:  FIVE (count ’em) 5 ads per page – SHAME on you Facebook – the highway robbery gets worse.  Advertisers, quick, go to CPC (don’t pay CPMs any more).

Multiple ads on the same page run up the impression numbers, but artificially depress click-throughs because even if they wanted to, users can only click on one ad at a time. Shame on your Facebook for overtly and systematically robbing advertisers who pay on a CPM basis.

But then again shame on you advertisers who still pay CPMs when you can easily click a radio button to select CPC — Facebook even suggests a range for you automatically (see inset below).

What is the advantage of paying by CPC (cost per click) instead of CPM (cost per thousand impressions)?  Well, remember the old ad industry joke “I know I am wasting half my ad dollars, I just don’t know which half” — well, now you know.  In fact, you now know you are wasting 99% of your ad dollars to wasted impressions that get no action/clicks from users AND you know which 99%.  See infographic below. So stop paying CPMs and start paying CPCs TODAY. Your ad budget will thank you!

Just how DISMAL are  Facebook advertising metrics and benchmarks (click to see )?

According to data from comScore, in Q3 2010, Facebook served 297 billion display ad impressions giving it 23% of the U.S. market for display ads. In digital channels, since there is no longer the physical limitation of time (airtime on TV) or space (area to put ads on dead-tree pulp) companies can create “inventory”  out of thin air and magically increase revenue on the backs of advertisers still willing to pay for impressions. I guess it really is caveat emptor.

chart of the day, share of online ad impressions, nov 2010

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Thursday, November 11th, 2010 analytics, digital, display advertising, marketing 1 Comment

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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