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Google’s Search Results Page Looks Different Now

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5958651/googles-search-results-page-looks-different-now

Google's Search Results Page Looks Different NowGoogle search results are like the old beat up recliner of the internet. Your butt’s always there, and if anything changes, you notice. Well, Google changed the way its search results look. It’s a relatively small change, but you’re going to notice.

The biggest difference is that the bar along the left hand side of your searches is gone. This is where you used to break your search down into News, or whatever else. That function is now at the top of your results, along with the also relocated Search Tools. Search Tools moving means you don’t have those two butt ugly calendars with custom dates in your line of sight, which is a plus. This change has been live a day or two, and should only be a negative if you’re running a ton of searches (it’s been killing me).

Google is also featuring information from Google’s Knowledge Graph for popular searches, like “barack obama”, “mitt romney”, and “presidential election”, for example. So! Google’s a little prettier, and it’s rearranged the furniture a bit. Seems like a nice, small change, right? [BuzzFeed]

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Wednesday, November 7th, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/vip/~3/kxnvLJen2SQ/best-buy-to-price+match-the-internet

Best Buy to Price-Match the InternetThe Wall Street Journal is reporting that Best Buy plans to match the price of internet retailers like Amazon over the holidays this year, as well as offering free home delivery when stores are out of stock.

According to a good ol’ “person familiar with the matter”, the electronics chain is assuming the strategy over the holiday season to draw customers away from shopping purely online. That’s something that will appeal to many consumers—especially those who prefer a traditional shopping experience.

It does, however, seem to contradict comments made by Best Buy’s new CEO Hubert Joly. He recently claimed that the prevalence of “showrooming”—where consumers head into shops to check out goods before ultimately buying online—has been blown out of proportion.

Maybe that contradiction is just reflective of the conundrum all big-box retailers face: they need to keep up with online retailers, but they don’t want to lose sight of what once made them successful. That’s a tough call.

Either way, price matching would inevitably draw in more custom. Would you buy something at Best Buy instead of ordering online, all prices being equal? [WSJ]

Image by Lynn Watson / Shutterstock.com

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Friday, October 12th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Office and School Supplies

Source: http://blog.compete.com/2012/07/29/sunday-series-office-and-school-supplies/

Colored Pencils

Image from: Colored Pencils / Shutterstock

I love office supplies. No one should ever leave me alone in a supply closet of office supplies unless they want to return to the sight of me hoarding fresh notebooks and pens. This Sunday Series I decided to take a look at June’s data for the industry profile of Shopping>Office and School Supplies, and I noticed that a few of the biggest movers were related to ink supplies. ┬áIt looks like offices aren’t feeling the drowsiness of summer and are keeping their ink supplies stocked and ready. Next month I’ll check back in to see if the impending school year has shifted the top 10, or if ink is still reigning supreme.

10 Gains in Monthly Unique Visitors for Office Supplies

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Wednesday, August 1st, 2012 news No Comments

Hackers Stole 174 Million Personal Records in 2011

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5895498/hackers-stole-174-million-personal-records-in-2011-and-a-ton-were-by-anonymous–co

Hackers Stole 174 Million Personal Records in 2011 (And a Ton Were by Anonymous & Co.)Verizon just put out its annual Data Breach Investigations Report, and you can probably guess what it says: 2011 was a banner year for hackers, and represented a huge statistical comeback. They compromised a total of 174 million records, 100 million of those in activism/for-the-lulz ops by Anon, Lulzsec, and friends.

2011 in a nutshell, for the hacking community: The Sony bonanza went on and on, Anon and Lulzsec tore up everyone in sight, and we got the best-worst hacker rap video in recent memory. Pretty solid year, right? Well yes, for everyone but the folks who were counting on hackers to stay as boring as they had been.

Verizon had hoped that the number of occurrences was on a permanent downward trend: After the total number of compromised records climbed year after year to a crazy 361 million in 2008, it dropped to 144 million in 2009 and just 4 million in 2010. That was while increasing the data sample, too.

Mitigating the crazy-high percentage of benevolent, well-intentioned breaches is the fact that almost 75 percent of the time, victims were warned ahead of time that they were about to be obliterated.

We’ve included an embedded copy of Verizon’s whole report below. But however you shake it, the translation’s pretty clear: Lock your sh*t up. [Verizon via Forbes]

2012 Data Breach Verizon

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Thursday, March 22nd, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5884415/travelling-in-modern-china-requires-serious-secret-agent-skills

Travelling in Modern Day China Requires Cold War Era Secret Agent SkillsIf Kenneth G. Lieberthal were anything but a China expert at the Brookings institution, his travelling-in-China security procedures would read like the product of a paranoid mind that watched too many spy movies as a kid:

He leaves his cellphone and laptop at home and instead brings “loaner” devices, which he erases before he leaves the United States and wipes clean the minute he returns. In China, he disables Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, never lets his phone out of his sight and, in meetings, not only turns off his phone but also removes the battery, for fear his microphone could be turned on remotely. He connects to the Internet only through an encrypted, password-protected channel, and copies and pastes his password from a USB thumb drive. He never types in a password directly, because, he said, “the Chinese are very good at installing key-logging software on your laptop.”

Talk about overkill, right? Well he’s not alone. The Times reports that these seemingly paranoid precautions are par for the course for just about anyone with valuable information including government officials, researchers, and even normal businessmen who do business in China.

But what about the rest of us? I may not have any valuable state secrets or research that needs protecting but that doesn’t mean I want the Chinese government snooping on my internetting when I visit my grandparents (especially when the consequences can be so severe). In the past, I’ve relied on a combination of VPNs, TOR, and password-protecting everything I can, but now it sounds like even that isn’t enough. Or maybe it’s totally overkill given my general unimportance in the grand scheme of things. Dear readers, I ask you, how much security is enough when it comes to the average person on vacation? [NY Times]

Image credit: Shutterstock/Rynio Productions

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Sunday, February 12th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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