status updates

What Internet Users Like to Share on Social Media Sites

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/online/what-internet-users-like-to-share-on-social-media-sites-36804/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

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Beyond pictures, the study finds that opinions, status updates regarding one’s activities, and links to articles (each at 26%) are most likely to be shared.

That suggests that the social media buffs surveyed late last year by SocialToaster were pretty much on point in their judgment that pictures and links are most likely to be shared.

The Ipsos survey also indicates that a significant proportion of internet users are sharing other types of content on social media, including:

  • Something they like or recommend, such as products, services, movies, and books (25%);
  • News items (22%);
  • Links to other websites (21%);
  • Reposts from other people’s social media posts (21%);
  • Status updates of what they’re feeling (19%);
  • Video clips (19%);
  • Plans for future activities, trips, and plans (9%); and
  • Other types of content (10%).

Who’s Most Likely to Share?

While 7 in 10 overall claim to share content, some demographic groups are more likely to engage in this behavior than others. Respondents aged under 35 are most likely to share (81%), a completely unsurprising result. Still, about 7 in 10 online users aged 35-49 said they had shared content on social media site! s during ! the past month, as did a majority 55% of respondents aged 50-64.

Also unsurprising: women (74%) were more likely than men (69%) to have shared some type of content during the past month. (Ipsos had also found sharing activity to be greater among youth and women in a previous study.)

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Thursday, September 19th, 2013 news No Comments

Remember When Facebook Wanted Your Phone Number For ‘Security’? It’s Using It To Sell Ads (FB)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-phone-number-security-being-sold-to-advertisers-2012-11

Mark Zuckerberg

Since about September, Facebook has offered its advertisers a powerful new way to track its users as they surf the web: It’s called “phone number retargeting.” The move came after Facebook made a big effort to collect its users’ mobile phone numbers to prevent security breaches.

More recently, according to AdExchanger, Facebook has combined phone retargeting with a new “conversion pixel” — a type of tracking  device, basically — within ads displayed on Facebook.

The combination of phone retargeting and conversion pixels allows advertisers to target you directly with ads and then measure exactly how you respond to them, whether by clicking, ignoring or buying something from the advertiser’s site.

Some advertisers have been doing this kind of thing on other web sites for years.

But most Facebook users don’t know it’s going on within Facebook. Instead, they believe the primary reason Facebook prompts them for a mobile phone number is to prevent account hacking, and to allow users to upload photos and make status updates from their phones.

In fact, earlier this year, Facebook began asking every user for a phone number for “security” purposes. Here’s what Facebook says about that:

facebook phone

But Facebook has since made those phone numbers available t! o advert isers as part of its new Custom Audience targeting product. “Audiences can be defined by either user email address, Facebook UIDs, or user phone numbers,” the product states.

Here’s how it works: Let’s say you are a member of your local gym. You probably gave the gym your phone number. But then you let your membership lapse, and now the gym wants to persuade you to come back. The gym can cross-reference its list of members’ phone numbers with users’ phone numbers on Facebook, and serve an ad on the page of any user with a matching number. Suddenly, you’re seeing ads that say, “Get 10% off if you rejoin your local gym!”

If you click on that ad, a conversion pixel will enable a “cookie” to track what you do so that the gym can see how successful its campaign was.

There’s a level of privacy built in to the system: Although your phone number will be targeted by ads, the number will be “hashed,” meaning that the system disguises it by replacing it with random code, making you anonymous. So the gym might target 100 phone numbers, but it won’t know which of those specific people actually responded to the ad (until they pay for a membership online, of course). All the gym will know is that a certain number responded to the ad, and that those users must have been on the original phone list.

Facebook launched the system to make its ads more effective for advertisers. The company believes they lower cost-per-acquisition (of users) for advertisers by 40 percent.

Disclosure: The author owns Facebook stock.

Related: Here Are The Sealed Court Papers On ‘Invalid Clicks’ Facebook Doesn’t Want You To See

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