sum

‘We’ve made the princely sum of £52’

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/12/07/gaming-company-derides-microsoft-rt-marketplace-/

Gaming company derides Microsoft Store 'We've made the princely sum of 52'

UK gaming outfit Rubicon has castigated Microsoft after claiming a Windows RT port of its Great Big War Game made a meager £52 ($83) in its first week in the store. The company was particularly incensed at Redmond’s lack of promotional features to help the title’s visibility, claiming that “if you’re familiar with (its) new store, this means our app is forever consigned to the garbage bin.” The company added that the iOS, Android “and even RIM” stores have promoted the app, which it said was widely lauded, and felt that after investing £10,000 on the port, “we got spat on” by the software giant. The developer punctuated its blog statement by saying it won’t work with Microsoft again, and “that store is going to look mighty bleak for a long time to come” if it doesn’t change its policy. No doubt there’s some sour grapes getting squeezed here, but it’s fair to say that RT is much in need of some sweeter news.

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Via: Games Industry

Source: Rubicon Blog

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Friday, December 7th, 2012 news No Comments

Google acquires coupon-focused Incentive Targeting for undisclosed sum

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/11/28/google-acquires-coupon-focused-incentive-targeting-for-undisclos/

Google acquires couponfocused Incentive Targeting for undisclosed sum

Google is no stranger to the business of discounts and special offers, but it looks like it’s decided to reach outside the company to further bolster its offerings. The company confirmed today that it has acquired the Cambridge, Massachusetts-based marketing firm Incentive Targeting for an undisclosed sum. While not offering too much in the way of specifics, Google said in a statement that “we look forward to working with Incentive Targeting in our ongoing efforts to help consumers save time and money and enable retailers deliver relevant discounts to the right customers.” For its part, Incentive Targeting has said that it “set out to do for retail couponing what Google had done for online advertising: make it simple, relevant, measurable, and effective,” and to that end it has developed a variety of tools for retailers and manufacturers alike, all designed to deliver coupons and discounts in a more targeting manner. You can find the company’s full statement on its website.

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Via: TechCrunch

Source: Incentive Targeting

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Wednesday, November 28th, 2012 news No Comments

Imagination Technologies snaps up CPU designer MIPS in an attempt to wrestle ARM

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/11/06/imagination-technologies-scoops-up-chip-designer-mips/

Imagination Technologies snaps up CPU designer MIPS in an attempt to wrestle ARM

Looks like we can kiss goodbye to any lingering politeness in the rivalry between these two UK chip houses, because the smaller one has just embarked on a cheeky expansion. Having been known mainly for its PowerVR graphics processors, not least in many Apple products, Imagination Tech could potentially push into the CPU arena too, through its $60 million acquisition of MIPS Technologies. Just Like ARM, MIPS designs low-power RISC processors for consumer electronics, but it has generally focused on smaller chips for devices like routers and TVs rather than smartphones and tablets. In addition to a portfolio of 82 exclusive patents, a squad of 160 MIPS engineers will now be transplanted to Imagination, where they’ll no doubt be debriefed and reassigned to conquering the world. Meanwhile, in some sort of flanking move, ARM has paid a far higher sum of $170 million to gain access to a number of other MIPS patents.

[Thanks, Michael]

Imagination Technologies snaps up CPU designer MIPS in an attempt to wrestle ARM originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 06 Nov 2012 06:41:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Tuesday, November 6th, 2012 news No Comments

A Quick Reminder About Which Industry Is Really Creating The Jobs Of The Future

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/healthcare-jobs-are-the-jobs-of-the-future-2012-11

As we’ve pointed out in the past, the industry of the future is healthcare.

The following chart is based on Friday’s jobs report, and it shows two things. The blue line is the total number of healthcare jobs. As you can see, it basically never stops going up (regardless sof business cycles) and has now passed 14.3 million.

The red line is the monthly change from month to month, and once again last month, America added over 30K new jobs, a pretty enormous sum, given that only 171K new jobs were created in total.

image

Regardless of what happens with government healthcare spending, the demand for more and more healthcare (as the US population ages) seems inexorable. More and more people will be working in this area.

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Sunday, November 4th, 2012 news No Comments

Giftly, A Startup That Wanted To Make All Gift Cards Digital, Had A Pivotal Moment Yesterday

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/giftly-2012-9

Tim Bently Giftly

Giftly launched last September with nearly $3 million in funding and a dream of making all gift cards mobile.

But after the holiday season struck, founder Tim Bentley and his team of ten started to rethink the product.

Giftly was a location-based gift card service. The sender could pick a venue and gift a friend a small sum to spend there. It used geo-location to unlock the giftcard when the recipient neared the venue.

But Bently found people preferred gifting items over locations. He and his team shifted the company’s vision, so much so that the site now reads, “A Giftly is not a giftcard…it’s better!”

They spent six months creating an iPhone app which went live yesterday. Now Giftly lets users send items or experiences to friends from their mobile devices.

Here’s how it works: A user selects a Facebook friend to send a gifted amount to, up to $250. They then select a suggested venue, but the Giftly can be unlocked and used anywhere by the friend. They also suggest an item for the friend to buy (see screenshot below).

When the friend uses the Giftly, they’re asked to send a quick message of thanks and a photo of the purchase to the user.

At its core, Giftly is a way to send small sums of money to friends, wrapped up in a thoughtful way. If you actually want to send your friend something like flowers or a cupcake, you’re still better off calling an actual store and getting the items delivered. But Bently thinks there’s a use case for people who want an easy way to be thoughtful from time to time.

“When we surveyed our users before, we asked them ! how ofte n they’d buy gift cards for people. They’d usually say twice per year, on birthdays and holidays,” says Bently says of pivot. “We realized we were building a product around giftcards and locations, and we were being too conservative. Really, people give little gifts to each other all the time.”

Here’s what the new app looks like:

giftly

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Friday, September 7th, 2012 news No Comments

The Most Popular Twitter Hashtags of 2011 [Twitter]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5865096/the-most-popular-twitter-hashtags-of-2011

The Most Popular Twitter Hashtags of 2011Sure you could say that Twitter has devolved into a chaotic mess filled with #AreWeSeriouslyTweetingThisLongHashtag and Bieber freaks, but it’s still boss at figuring out what’s going on at this very second. So taking a look back at the past year, what were the most popular Twitter moments in 2011? It gets a little weird.

It either speaks to my growing uncoolness or Twitter’s tween explosion that I have no idea what channel Pretty Little Liars is on, why Raven Symone is more popular than Natalie Portman on the actress list and how the Sony NGP a more talked about topic than the iPhone and Android. What is going on?!

My favorite list though, has to be the most popular food and drink items of 2011:

McLobster
Fried Kool-Aid
Starbucks Trenta
Devassa Beer
Guinness
BBQ
Mac & Cheese

We’re all so fat it is glorious. Anyway, here are the most popular Twitter hashtags of 2011:

#egypt
#tigerblood
#threewordstoliveby
#idontunderstandwhy
#japan
#improudtosay
#superbowl
#jan25

Hey egypt, japan, jan25 and even tigerblood and superbowl sum up the year fairly well! Good job tweeple. But #improudtosay, #idontunderstandwhy #threewordstoliveby managed to make the top freaking hashtags of the year. Let’s do better in 2012 Twitter. [“>Twitter]

The Most Popular Twitter Hashtags of 2011


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Monday, December 5th, 2011 news No Comments

An Evolutionary Step In iPad Gaming [Ipadapps]

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5582559/osmos-for-ipad-ambient-gaming-tailor+made-for-the-tablet

Osmos for iPad: An Evolutionary Step In iPad GamingWhen the iPad was unveiled and I started to imagine the types of games a 9″ touch screen might engender, I envisioned gorgeous, intuitive and, above all, immersive experiences. Osmos for iPad is one of the best I’ve found yet.

The game, which is adapted from a well-regarded PC version and costs $5 in the App Store, puts you in control of a tiny blue organism, a mote, which you direct around the screen, growing in size as you absorb the smaller blobs around you. Of course, all sorts of challenges, including bigger motes trying to absorb you, complicate that mission.

But what’s really special about Osmos is the experience of controlling that game play. Tapping behind your mote scoots him around the screen, predictably, but at any time you can pinch to zoom in or out, allowing you to navigate a tight passage or survey the level at a distance. Additionally, you can swipe with one finger to alter time—drag left and all the motes slow to a crawl, drag right and they shoot around like bouncy balls. Different speeds and levels of zoom have situations in which they’re uniquely useful, and these elegant controls are the perfect complement to the game’s polished visuals.

Osmos teaches you these gestures in early levels, but after that there’s little instruction. You’re given a basic goal and left to your own devices to go about achieving it. Depending on your style, the game play can be rambunctious or meditative, and often it’s both in the course of one level.

There’s not a huge variation in the game play, admittedly, and it’s so engrossing that I imagine most players will zip through the Odyssey track pretty quickly (there’s an arcade mode that lets you play levels one at a time, too). But in some ways this simplicity is the game’s biggest asset, because it allows for a remarkable cohesiveness between all of its elements, from game play and visual style down to the soundtrack and menus. It’s not only a “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts” type thing; here, the whole is so dazzlingly packaged that you don’t really think of the “parts” as parts at all.

For me, Osmos on the iPad is an experience first and a game second, and it uses the iPad to achieve game play that would be impossible—or, at least, not nearly as compelling—on any other platform. At its best, the iPad isn’t just an app machine or a gaming device but a portal into some other environment all together, and I hope that developers will follow Osmos’ lead and strive not just to adapt familiar gaming experiences to the tablet but to create new ones for it entirely. [iTunes]

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Friday, July 9th, 2010 news No Comments

Guy Wins $1,000,000 For Pitching A Perfect Game…In A Videogame

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5532088/guy-wins-1000000-for-pitching-a-perfect-gamein-a-videogame

Guy Wins src=The folks at 2K Sports offered $1 million to the first person to pitch a perfect game in Major League Baseball 2K10—a supposedly difficult task. 24 hours after the game was released, they had to write a check.

Using Braves pitcher Kenshin Kawakami as his avatar, 24-year-old Alabama resident Wade McGilberry was able to complete his million dollar game in less than 90 minutes after returning home from work.

Great news for Wade because he recorded his attempts according to 2K Sports’ rules, but not so great news for them because as “insurance companies couldn’t possibly come up with the odds of throwing a perfect game, 2K Sports didn’t take out insurance and now will pay McGilberry a lump sum of $1 million out of its own pocket.” Oops. [CNBC via Sporting NewsThanks, Ezra Tenenbaum!]

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Wednesday, May 5th, 2010 news No Comments

Evidence for Increasing Online Use that is also Accelerating

If you sum up the total unique user sessions in Jan 2008, Jan 2009, and Jan 2010, you get

Jan 2008 – 285M

Jan 2009 – 337M

Jan 2010 – 413M

That is a year-over-year increase of 18% and 23% respectively. Assuming the population of the world does not change that much year to year, the change in total unique sessions leads to the conclusion that online usage continues to increase noticeably.

The Compete.com chart below shows nearly identical number if unique users monthly — Google at 148M uniques and Yahoo at 132M uniques. And Facebook alone achieved another 134M uniques. So while the unique visitors across these 3 sites are not mutually exclusive, there are 414M unique user sessions in the month of January 2010

facebook-yahoo-google-2-year

Well, this is strange. January 2010 numbers from Nielsen reveal Google has 66.3% of the search market, while Yahoo has 14.5% and Microsoft has 10.9% across its various properties. Google is 4x more than Yahoo and 6x more than Microsoft.

search-share-jan-2010


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Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010 digital No Comments

Inside Google’s Secret Search Algorithm

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/zzkIcilnJp4/inside-googles-secret-search-algorithm

Wired’s Steven Levy takes us inside the “algorithm that rules the web“—Google’s search algorithm, of course—and if you use Google, it’s kind of a must-read. PageRank? That’s so 1997.

It’s known that Google constantly updates the algorithm, with 550 improvements this year—to deliver smarter results and weed out the crap—but there are a few major updates in its history that have significantly altered Google’s search, distilled in a helpful chart in the Wired piece. For instance, in 2001, they completely rewrote the algorithm; in 2003, they added local connectivity analysis; in 2005, results got personal; and most recently, they’ve added in real-time search for Twitter and blog posts.

The sum of everything Google’s worked on—the quest to understand what you mean, not what you say—can be boiled down to this:

This is the hard-won realization from inside the Google search engine, culled from the data generated by billions of searches: a rock is a rock. It’s also a stone, and it could be a boulder. Spell it “rokc” and it’s still a rock. But put “little” in front of it and it’s the capital of Arkansas. Which is not an ark. Unless Noah is around. “The holy grail of search is to understand what the user wants,” Singhal says. “Then you are not matching words; you are actually trying to match meaning.”

Oh, and by the way, you’re a guinea pig every time you search for something, if you hadn’t guessed as much already. Google engineer Patrick Riley tells Levy, “On most Google queries, you’re actually in multiple control or experimental groups simultaneously.” It lets them constantly experiment on a smaller scale—even if they’re only conducting a particular experiment on .001 percent of queries, that’s a lot of data.

Be sure to check out the whole piece, it’s ridiculously fascinating, and borders on self-knowledge, given how much we all use Google (sorry, Bing). [Wired, Sweet graphic by Wired’s Mauricio Alejo]

Additional Information on Real Time Bidding

http://go-digital.net/blog/2009/09/rtb-real-time-bidding-may-make-ad-exchanges-more-efficient-but-it-still-wont-save-display-ads/

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Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010 digital No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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